Chronic Pain Management and Marijuana Use: Science-Based Education in Times of Legalization.

Principal Investigator:
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
Senior Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
bia@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini

Date: October 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015
Sponsor: Washington State Office of the Attorney General (A85413)
Categories: Marijuana | Training / Information

Other Investigators: Sharon Garrett; Dennis M. Donovan; Jennifer Velotta; Roger Roffman; Gregory Carter; Nancy Sutherland; Meg Brunner


Description: This project addresses gaps in science-based training and education in the area of chronic pain management and cannabis use. The ultimate goal is to increase awareness of treatment options to treat pain and other medical conditions, and decrease unnecessary suffering among people living with chronic pain in the state of Washington. The project will also provide information and education about medical conditions and populations for whom cannabis is not recommended, as well as side-effects and risks. This project proposes development and provision of training and education resources on chronic pain and medical cannabis for the following target groups: a) staff and volunteers of community organizations that provide information and referral for a range of situations involving substance use and people struggling with chronic and acute conditions (Poison Center, Crisis Clinic and Washington Recovery Helpline); b) health care providers and c) the general public. [Photo from the Office of Attorney General Bob Ferguson.]

 

Related Web Sites:
Project website

Computer Adapted Standardized Patient for MI Skills Assessment - Phase I

Principal Investigator:
John S. Baer, PhD
Research Professor, Psychology ; Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
jsbaer@u.washington.edu

Date: September 1, 2005 to April 30, 2010
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (5R42DA020284-03)
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe, MSW; Bryan Hartzler, PhD; Susan A. Stoner, PhD


Description: There is a great need to facilitate dissemination of empirically based methods in addiction treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported therapeutic approach developed by Miller and Rollnick (1991, 2002). Although there is high demand for MI training, there is a lack of low-cost, reliable, and ecologically valid assessment methods for evaluating training needs and outcomes (Baer et al., 2004).

In this study, investigators conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionalspropose to develop and validate a novel method of assessing clinician skill with MI by creating a Computer-Adapted Standardized Patients Instrument (CASPI) with the potential to be used in any setting with a personal computer. The product would provide a widely accessible and cost- efficient alternative to existing methods of clinician MI skill assessment. If successful, the CASPI methodology could be developed for many empirically derived treatments. Methods to accurately assess clinician skills at modest costs should greatly facilitate dissemination of research-based interventions. In Phase I, we developed a prototype of the CASPI and conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionals. Results showed that CASPI was well-received overall by providers, and has excellent internal reliability and highly encouraging preliminary concurrent validity with other established measures.

This project received continued funding for Phase II.

ADAI is a sub-contractor for this project for Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)

Results: Baer JS, Carpenter K, Beadnell B, Stoner S, Ingalsbe M, Hartzler B, Rosengren DR, Drager Z. Computer Assessment of Simulated Patient Interviews (CASPI): Psychometric properties of a web-based system for the assessment of motivational interviewing skills. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2012;73(1):154-164. Full text PMC3237707

Related Web Sites:
NIH RePORTER record

Computer Adapted Standardized Patient for MI Skills Assessment - Phase II

Principal Investigator:
John S. Baer, PhD
Research Professor, Psychology ; Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
jsbaer@u.washington.edu

Date: September 1, 2005 to April 30, 2011
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (5R42DA020284-03 and 2R42DA020284-02A1)
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe; Bryan Hartzler, Ph.D.


Description: There is a great need to facilitate dissemination of empirically based methods in addiction treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported therapeutic approach developed by Miller and Rollnick (1991, 2002). Although there is high demand for MI training, there is a lack of low-cost, reliable, and ecologically valid assessment methods for evaluating training needs and outcomes (Baer et al., 2004).

Investigators propose to develop and validate a novel method of assessing clinician skill with MI by creating a Computer-Adapted Standardized Patients Instrument (CASPI) with the potential to be used in any setting with a personal computer. The product would provide a widely accessible and cost- efficient alternative to existing methods of clinician MI skill assessment. If successful, the CASPI methodology could be developed for many empirically derived treatments. Methods to accurately assess clinician skills at modest costs should greatly facilitate dissemination of research-based interventions.

In Phase I, we developed a prototype of the CASPI and conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionals. Results showed that CASPI was well-received overall by providers, and has excellent internal reliability and highly encouraging preliminary concurrent validity with other established measures.

In the current Phase II, we will develop a second form of the CASPI, build a computer-assisted scoring interface, and conduct a randomized study of the revised CASPI to evaluate it as an index of training outcomes. In addition, construct validity will be established in comparison with tapes of standardized patient encounters.

ADAI is a sub-contractor for this project for Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)

Related Web Sites:
NIH RePORTER record

Development and Evaluation of Context-Tailored Training

Principal Investigator:
John S. Baer, PhD
Research Professor, Psychology ; Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
jsbaer@u.washington.edu

Date: June 1, 2004 to March 31, 2007
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01DA016360)
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Bryan Hartzler, Ph.D. (Project Director)


Description: The development of empirically-supported treatments for substance abuse disorders, although productive over the past twenty years, has not been accompanied by an equal effort in the transfer, or dissemination of such approaches to standard practice. Dissemination appears unlikely to occur without specific efforts, including the training of professional staff in new techniques. Yet little is known about what types of training efforts are effective for different types of interventions for substance abuse treatment professionals with varying clinical skills and experience. In response to PA-03-126, NIDA Behavioral Therapy Development Program, the proposed Phase III research will develop and evaluate an innovative model for the training of counselors working in agencies providing substance abuse treatment. Based on concepts of technology transfer, change in practice behavior is seen as more likely in response to training that is tailored to the individual's professional needs and accompanied by contextual processes that remind, reinforce, and support changes in clinical practice. Training must also involve assessment and consultation in partnership with agencies providing substance abuse services. A "Context Tailored" training model will be developed for skills in Motivational Interviewing (MI), a clinical approach that has strong empirical support and for which training is often requested. The model will be pilot tested in two agencies. After revision, the training model will then be compared to a traditional CPE workshop in a small randomized trial with six additional agencies. The new, context based model is expected to achieve greater acquisition, maintenance and generalization of specific MI skills compared to a traditional CPE workshop, as assessed in practice with actual patients. The proposed research is designed to provide standardization and preliminary data-based support for context-tailored training. If successful, subsequent proposals for research on a much larger scale can test training effectiveness across a broad range of agencies, personnel, and topics.

Results: Imel ZE, Baldwin S, Baer JS, Hartzler B, Dunn C, Rosengren DR, Atkins D. Evaluating therapist adherence in motivational interviewing by comparing performance with standardized and real patients. J Consult Clin Psychol 2014 (in press)

Hartzler B, Beadnell B, Rosengren DB, Dunn CW, Baer JS. Deconstructing proficiency in motivational interviewing: Mechanics of skilful practitioner delivery during brief simulated encounters. Behav Cogn Psychother 2010 Jul 9:1-18. Full text PMC3236613

Baer JS, Wells EA, Rosengren DB, Hartzler B, Beadnell B, Dunn CW. Agency context and tailored training in technology transfer: A pilot evaluation of motivational interviewing training for community counselors. J Subst Abuse Treat 2009;37(2):191-202. Full text PMC2737382

Rosengren DB, Hartzler B, Baer JS, Wells EA, Dunn CW. The Video Assessment of Simulated Encounters-Revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills. Drug Alcohol Depend 2008;97(1-2):130-138. Full text PMC2578843

Hartzler B, Baer JS, Dunn CW, Rosengren DB, Wells EA. What is seen through the looking glass: The impact of training on practitioner self-rating of motivational interviewing skills. Behav Cognit Psychother 2007;35:431-445.

Related Web Sites:
NIH RePORTER Record

Drugged Driving Information Service (DDIS)

Principal Investigator:
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
calebbg@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Date: August, 2012 to May, 2013
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Categories: Prevention Research | Training / Information

Other Investigators: Heather Lonzack, Nancy Sutherland, Dennis Donovan


Description: In a subcontract with Looking Glass Analytics, ADAI will develop a knowledge base as part of the Drugged Driving Information Sercice (DDIS). ADAI will review and organize literature on intervention strategies to prevent or reduce drugged driving.

DDIS will be an Internet-based data management and online knowledge base. The work proposed will improve substantially the quality, quantity, and accessibility of information for traffic safety personnel, substance abuse researchers and prevention specialists. The innovative feature of the DDIS is the combination of data on a significant public safety problem and analytic tools to manage it. It will provide those in the field with a single source of information to measure the extent of the drugged driving problem in a particular locale and to pick an evidence-based intervention to combat the problem.

Inventory of Evidence-Based Practices for Treating Substance Use Disorders

Principal Investigator:
Nancy Sutherland, MLS
Associate Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
nsutherland@adai.washington.edu

Date: March 1, 2004 to June 30, 2004
Sponsor: Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Meg Brunner, MLIS; Lynn McIntosh


Description: The availability of empirically supported clinical practices and interventions for the treatment of substance use disorders has increased as research moves from tightly controlled studies in the laboratory to community treatment settings. As empirically validated, manual-based approaches grow in number, it becomes more difficult for addiction professionals and policy makers to stay informed about the variety of practices with proven efficacy for use with different client populations and drug problems.

The EBP Substance Abuse web site and database is designed to help treatment providers make informed decisions about which science-based practices are most appropriate in which circumstances for which individuals.

Related Web Sites:
EBP Website

Native Healing and Wellness Conference

Principal Investigator:
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Date: July 12, 2007 to March 31, 2011
Sponsor: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R13MD002247)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Training / Information

Other Investigators: Lisette Austin, MA (Conference & Research Coodinator)


Description: This conference grant supported the planning and implementation of two one-and-a-half day conferences that brought together representatives from the 29 federally recognized tribes, other American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) agencies, and urban AIAN communities in Washington State. The first conference ("Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in May 2008 at the Suquamish-owned Kiana Lodge in Paulsbo, WA. The second meeting ("Native Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in September 200 at the Great Wolf Lodge, Centralia, WA.

Background: According to the 2000 census, there are approximately 93,000 American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) people in the state of Washington (1.6% of the total population). AIAN individuals and communities are distributed across the state with communities ranging from small, rural groups to urban, inter-Tribal ones. Due to complex relationships between Tribes and local, state, and federal agencies, health care may be provided either by the Tribe, local service providers, the state, and Indian Health Service facility, a regional Native Health Board, or by some combination of the above. Because of this, there is very little empirical data about health disparities as they are experienced by AIAN communities, especially in regards to mental health and substance abuse services. Little is also known about the many community-developed programs that often incorporate Tribal values, practices, and beliefs, and have anecdotal evidence of effectiveness. Finally, a lack of funding and overburdened resources result in decreased access to appropriate training for many mental health and substance abuse service providers working with Tribal communities.

The primary aims of these conferences are to: 1) identify substance abuse and mental health disparity issues of greatest concern to urban, rural, and reservation Tribal communities; 2) identify best practices that have been developed in Tribal communities to address such issues but that may be lacking strong empirical evidence; 3) educate Tribal communities and researchers by providing expert speakers who can address health issues of concern to Tribal communities; 4) provide specific clinical skills for working with AIAN communities regarding mental health and substance abuse; and 5) provide an opportunity for Tribal organizations to connect and collaborate with researchers and network with other Tribal communities. A conference report was published after the first conference, documenting these issues and practices and setting the agenda for future conferences.

Related Web Sites:
Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference website, with summary report and slides about the conference.
Native Healing and Wellness Conference program
NIH RePORTer record

Northwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center

Principal Investigator:
Hartzler, Bryan, PhD
Senior Research Scientist / NWATTC Director
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
hartzb@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_hartzler

Date: 30-Sep-20017 to September 20, 2022
Sponsor: Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Denna Vandersloot, Co-Director; Bia Carlini, Meg Brunner, Dennis Donovan, Erinn McGraw


Related Web Sites:
http://www.attcnetwork.org/regional-centers/?rc=northwest

NW Frontier Addiction Technology Transfer Center

Principal Investigator:
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD

Date: September 30, 2006 to September 20, 2010
Sponsor: Oregon Health and Science University
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Lynn McIntosh; Nancy Sutherland


Description: With funding from the Northwest Frontier Addiction Technology Transfer Center (NFATTC), ADAI supports a Technology Transfer Specialist. As liasison with addiction treatment organizations, addiction educators, and state agencies, the TTS focuses on training and dissemination of evidence-based practices in substance abuse treatment to addictions professionals and trainees in Washington state and Alaska, for the purpose of improving the practice of addiction treatment.

Related Web Sites:
NFATTC web page

Psychology Training in Alcohol Research

Principal Investigator:
Mary E. Larimer, PhD
Professor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Date: July 1, 1984 to June 30, 2019
Sponsor: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (5T32AA007455)
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Dennis M. Donovan, PhD Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute)


Description: Dr. Donovan serves as a primary faculty member and mentor for a NIAAA-funded T32 pre- and postdoctoral training program. This program is housed in the Center for the Study of Health Risk Behaviors (CSHRB) within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Principal Investigator is Mary Larimer.

This 2-year fellowship provides training for individuals who wish to pursue a career in alcohol research, with an emphasis on the etiology and prevention of problem drinking and alcohol dependence. As this topic will be approached from both psychosocial and bio-behavioral perspectives, individuals with background training in relevant areas of psychology (clinical, health psychology, behavioral neuroscience, social, developmental, cognitive, behavioral pharmacology, etc.) are encouraged to apply. Both human and animal research is supported.

Related Web Sites:
CSHRB Postdoc Training page
NIH RePORTERer record

Substance Use Screening & Assessment Instruments Database

Principal Investigator:
Nancy Sutherland, MLS
Associate Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
nsutherland@adai.washington.edu


Sponsor: Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Meg Brunner, MLIS; Pam Miles, MLS


Description: The Substance Use Screening & Assessment Instruments web site and database is intended to help clinicians and researchers find instruments used for screening and assessment of substance use and substance use disorders. The database currently has records about more than 350 instruments and is updated regularly.

This web site features a searchable database of questionnaires and measures used in clinical practice and research on substance abuse. It includes instruments with proven clinical utility and research validity, as well as newer instruments that have not yet been thoroughly evaluated but may be of interest to someone doing research on AOD assessment. Records cite the name, acronym, and developer(s) of the measures as well as a brief description. They are indexed by population group, purpose of instrument (e.g. diagnostic, treatment planning) and administration format (e.g. self- or clinician-administered), among other criteria. Records include information about scoring and administration, psychometrics, source, and related references. Scales that are in the public domain can be downloaded in PDF format or are linked to a web site. For instruments that are proprietary, information about their availability and pricing is given if known. Other features of the web site include a brief glossary of terms about assessment, an annotated list of resources for finding instruments (including sources not listed here), and canned searches of PubMed and the ADAI Library catalog for literature about the specific instruments or about AOD assessment in general.

Related Web Sites:
Substance Abuse Screening & Assessment Instrument Database

Toolkit for Enhancing Client Retention in Substance Abuse Treatment

Principal Investigator:
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
sradin@adai.uw.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Date: June 16, 2014 to December 31, 2014
Sponsor: Washington State Division of Behavioral Health & Recovery
Categories: Training / Information

Other Investigators: Meg Brunner, MLS; Jennifer Velotta, CDP, MNPL


Description: This project was to develop a toolkit for enhancing engagement and retention in clients in substance abuse treatment. The audience is treatment providers and staff. The toolkit is online product, composed of selected resources and instruction on how to make use of the tools.

Related Web Sites:
Retention Toolkit website

Web-Based Skills Training: SBIRT-PC

Principal Investigator:
Susan Stoner, PhD
Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)

Date: 2009 to 2011
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (271200900035C-2-0-1)
Categories: Tobacco Cessation | Training / Information

Other Investigators: Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator); Kelly M. Carpenter, PhD (Co-PI)


Description: The goal of this NIDA SBIR project is to design, develop and to evaluate a web-based training program to teach screening and brief intervention for substance use problems to primary care physicians. The WBT will be designated to train PCPs to screen, intervene, and refer for substance problems and to support the use and maintenance of those skills with reference guides, screening tools and location-specific referral databases.

Related Web Sites:
NIH RePORTER record


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