CBPR with Tribal Colleges and Universities: Alcohol Problems and Solutions

Principal Investigator:
Bonnie M. Duran, Dr Ph
Associate Professor, Health Services
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, School of Social Work

Date: September 30, 2009 to August 31, 2013
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (5RO1DA029001-02)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives

Other Investigators: Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Investigator


Description: Although there is some evidence that there is a large dispartity in American Indians and Alaska Natives alcohol, drug abuse and mental disorder prevalence rates, there has never been a study of problem drinking, drug use or mental disosrders at any ofthe 34 US Tribal colleges or universities (TCU); and existing data is not comparable. Student characteristics, enrollment, funding, faculty and staff composition, and economic context are drastically different in tribal colleges from non-tribal institutions; there is little external validity for studies conducted among other college populations. The long-term vision of this research is to reduce alcohol, drug and mental disorder (ADM) related-health disparities for American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIAN), and to increase postsecondary academic success.

This research project aims to conduct the first study of alcohol related problems at TCU and is the preliminary research needed to develop culturally appropriate and sustainable alcohol interventions at Northwest Indian College (NWIC) and other tribal colleges in the U.S. by using a community-based participatory research approach.

Aims are to: l.Compile and summarize the epidemiologic literature regarding AIAN college student alcohol and drug consumption patterns and mental disorder problems and interventions; 2. Conduct a needs and capacity assessment survey with 34 TCU to document what is known about ADM prevalence and susceptibility; b.Risk, protective factors and outcomes of ADM including academic outcomes;c.The extent of clinical level problems such as alcohol and drug abuse and dependence, common mental disorders and comorbidity; d. Best, promising and current practices for ADM prevention, screening, treatment and referral services; and e.TCU organizational capacity for student ADM interventions and academic programs; 3. Conduct focus groups to identify a menu of core elements of a comprehensive ADM intervention that is culturally appropriate, sustainable and evidence-supported; b.Effective ways to conduct outreach and screening for ADM services; and 4. Disseminate study findings broadly.

Related Web Sites:
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute/UW
NIH RePORTer record

Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-Based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives

Principal Investigator:
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute

Date: 2008? to August 31, 2010
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse ; National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Clinical and Health Services | CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)

Other Investigators: Cynthia Pearson, PhD (Project Director)


Description: This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node of the NIDA CTN. The specific aim of this project is to develop a user-friendly manual or "field guide" on the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and Tribal participatory research (TPR) methods for academic researchers and Tribal communities to use when developing and implementing culturally relevant, truly collaborative research in the areas of substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, mental health, and other areas of health disparities in American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) populations.

The manual will be developed by collecting and incorporating information from several sources: (1) review of available literature; (2) focus groups or interviews with participants from Tribal communities; (3) focus groups or interviews with academic representatives; and (4) asking both community and academic partners to provide information about their experiences with research in AIAN communities (via email list).

Related Web Sites:
Protocol record in CTN Library


The Healing of the Canoe

Principal Investigator:
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute ; Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan

Date: September 28, 2005 to February 28, 2013
Sponsor: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R24 MD001764)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives

Other Investigators: Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD; Lisette Austin, PhD; Heather Lonczak, PhD


Description: The overall goal of this collaboration is to work in partnership to plan, implement, and evaluate a community-based and culturally congruent intervention to reduce health disparities and promote health in the Suquamish Tribe, a federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native reservation community located in the Pacific Northwest. This three-year planning project will proceed in two phases. Phase 1 will take place in Year 1 and is devoted to partnership development, conducting community needs and resources assessment, identification of health issues of concern for the Suquamish community, and identifying, planning, and adapting a community based intervention to address the identified health issue(s). Phase 2 will take place in Years 2 and 3 and will be devoted to piloting and evaluating the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methodology will be utilized, involving the community in each aspect of the planning and implementation of the intervention. In addition, a Suquamish Tribal member will serve as a Co-Investigator, and community members will serve as key personnel. Both outcome and process data will be collected to determine feasibility, applicability and to develop a model that other Community-Campus partnerships can utilize to work collaboratively to identify and reduce health disparities in ethnically, culturally, socioeconomically, and geographically diverse populations.

Related Web Sites:
Canoe Project Home
NIH RePORTER record

Knowledge of and Attitudes about Medication Assisted Treatment within American Indian Communities

Principal Investigator:
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Date: 2017
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Implementation Research | CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)

Other Investigators: Co-investigators: Dennis Donovan, Dennis Wendt


Description: This study, in partnership with two American Indian tribes in the Pacific Northwest, addresses critical barriers in the implementation of medication assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). MAT approaches have been shown to substantially improve outcomes for OUD patients, yet provider and patient biases against MAT and organizational barriers to MAT use are widespread, particularly within tribal communities where there is a strong preference toward total abstinence as a goal. The study aim is to identify knowledge and perceptions of MAT approaches and barriers/facilitators for implementation and sustained use. Study results will inform future clinical efforts to tailor MAT for high need, low resource American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) populations.

Related Web Sites:
Protocol record in CTN Library

Methamphetamine: Where Does It Fit in the Bigger Picture of Drug Use of American Indian and Alaska Native Communities and Treatment Seekers?

Principal Investigator:
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD, Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan

Date: 2008? to August 31, 2010
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends | CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)

Other Investigators: Sandra Radin, Lisa Rey Thomas, Caleb Banta-Green


Description: The first area of research emphasis in the NIDA Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. Because there are limited data available on methamphetamine use in American Indian communities, exploratory and pilot studies will be conducted as part of CTN protocol CTN-0033 to develop collaborations with tribes and Native American treatment programs and to explore the epidemiology of methamphetamine use and co-occurring problems and disorders in diverse Native American communities.

Protocol CTN-0033-Ot-3 will conduct exploratory and preliminary studies to develop collaborative working relationships with tribes and tribal treatment programs in the Western Washington and Southeast Alaska to assess the epidemiology of co-occurring health disorders among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) seeking treatment for methamphetamine and other substance use in reservation-based and urban treatment centers.

Related Web Sites:
Protocol record in CTN Library

Native Healing and Wellness Conference

Principal Investigator:
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Date: July 12, 2007 to March 31, 2011
Sponsor: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (R13MD002247)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Training / Information

Other Investigators: Lisette Austin, MA (Conference & Research Coodinator)


Description: This conference grant supported the planning and implementation of two one-and-a-half day conferences that brought together representatives from the 29 federally recognized tribes, other American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) agencies, and urban AIAN communities in Washington State. The first conference ("Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in May 2008 at the Suquamish-owned Kiana Lodge in Paulsbo, WA. The second meeting ("Native Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in September 200 at the Great Wolf Lodge, Centralia, WA.

Background: According to the 2000 census, there are approximately 93,000 American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) people in the state of Washington (1.6% of the total population). AIAN individuals and communities are distributed across the state with communities ranging from small, rural groups to urban, inter-Tribal ones. Due to complex relationships between Tribes and local, state, and federal agencies, health care may be provided either by the Tribe, local service providers, the state, and Indian Health Service facility, a regional Native Health Board, or by some combination of the above. Because of this, there is very little empirical data about health disparities as they are experienced by AIAN communities, especially in regards to mental health and substance abuse services. Little is also known about the many community-developed programs that often incorporate Tribal values, practices, and beliefs, and have anecdotal evidence of effectiveness. Finally, a lack of funding and overburdened resources result in decreased access to appropriate training for many mental health and substance abuse service providers working with Tribal communities.

The primary aims of these conferences are to: 1) identify substance abuse and mental health disparity issues of greatest concern to urban, rural, and reservation Tribal communities; 2) identify best practices that have been developed in Tribal communities to address such issues but that may be lacking strong empirical evidence; 3) educate Tribal communities and researchers by providing expert speakers who can address health issues of concern to Tribal communities; 4) provide specific clinical skills for working with AIAN communities regarding mental health and substance abuse; and 5) provide an opportunity for Tribal organizations to connect and collaborate with researchers and network with other Tribal communities. A conference report was published after the first conference, documenting these issues and practices and setting the agenda for future conferences.

Related Web Sites:
Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference website, with summary report and slides about the conference.
Native Healing and Wellness Conference program
NIH RePORTer record

Native Pathways to Sobriety: Pacific Northwest Oral Life Histories

Principal Investigator:
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Date: September 30, 2009 to August 31, 2013
Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse (1R01DA029002-01)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives | Clinical and Health Services

Other Investigators: Lisette Austin


Description: Like other NARCH components, this project will be conducted according to the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), with the consensus and collaboration of tribal communities and tribal partners. The NARCH Initiative supports partnerships throught the nation, between Tribes and Tribally-based organizations and institutions to develop opportunities for conducting research, research training, and faculty development to meet the needs of tribal communities.

Related Web Sites:
NIH RePORTER record

Navigating Our Strengths and Needs: A Community Assessment Project for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe

Principal Investigator:
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
sradin@adai.uw.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Date: January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2017
Sponsor: Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe through a grant from the US-DHHS Administration for Native Americans
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives


Description: This project will increase accessibility to the full range of services and programs, reduce barriers to participation, and improve the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s understanding of the community’s strengths and weaknesses.

This project will develop, conduct, analyze, and report on a comprehensive assessment of Tribal needs, assets, strengths, challenges, resources and priorities that can be utilized for effective cross-disciplinary planning and evaluation.

Promoting Healthy Families and Relationships: Exploring Domestic Violence and Tribal Community Culture to Inform Best Practices

Principal Investigator:
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
sradin@adai.uw.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Date: 2013 to 2014
Sponsor: UW Dept. of Global Health - Global WACh (Women, Adolescent, Child Health)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives

Other Investigators: Teresa A. Evans-Campbell, PhD; Swinomish Indian Tribal Community


Description: Domestic violence is prevalent in many American Indian communities, yet American Indian domestic violence research and culturally appropriate and effective interventions are lacking. To better understand domestic violence and inform best practices in one American Indian tribal community, our community-university team will utilize quantitative and qualitative data and a Grounded Theory approach to: determine domestic violence prevalence; describe community members’ attitudes, beliefs, and the sociocultural/historical milieu around women and children’s safety; assess existing resources and needs; and identify 1-2 existing evidence based domestic violence interventions that meet local needs and may be appropriately and effectively adapted to local culture and setting.

Washington Tribes and RAIO Health Priorities Summit

Principal Investigator:
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Research Scientist
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Date: June 24, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Sponsor: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1038263)
Categories: American Indians / Alaska Natives


Description: The Washington Tribes and Recognized American Indian Organizations (RAIO) Health Priorities Summit will invite leaders from the 29 federally recognized Tribes and the five RAIOs in Washington State for one and one-half days to work together to identify and document: 1) health priorities or issues of greatest concern in the Tribal and American Indian/Alaska Native communities and urban areas, 2) promising practices that are in place or in development in these communities, and 3) gaps in health services and strategies for addressing these shortcomings. These dialogues will result in a report that prioritizes health needs, resources and gaps with regards to the health of AIAN people in WA State to make recommendations and guide policy. In addition, the report will serve to develop a health research agenda driven by Tribes and RAIOs.


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