AccessNo
1

Name
Addiction Admission Scale

Acronym
AAS

Developer
Weed, Nathan C.
Butcher, James N.
McKenna, Thomas
Ben-Povath, Yossef S.

Description
The AAS is an MMPI-2 scale that detects alcohol/drug abuse problems in the context of a clinical personality assessment. The AAS consists of 13 items and is available in either pencil-and-paper self-administered or computer self-administered format. It is especially helpful for literate, adult subjects with at least a sixth-grade reading level. The AAS is useful in clinical settings because can be scored from MMPI-2 and detects acknowledgement of alcohol/drug problems. It is also useful for researchers because it has a substantial normative base.

Availability
Copyright for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) is held by the Regents of the University of Minnesota 1942, 1943, 1951, 1967 (renewed 1970), 1989.

Contact
Pearson Assessments<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55440<br>
Tel: 800-627-7271<br>
<a href=mailto:pearsonassessments@pearson.com">pearsonassessments@pearson.com</a><br>
<a href="http://pearsonassessments.com">http://pearsonassessments.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Addiction Admission Scale 1.pdf
[NIAAA version]

SourceRef
Weed NC, Butcher JN, McKenna T, Ben-Povath YS. New measures for assessing alcohol and drug abuse problems with the MMPI-2: The APS and AAS. Journal of Personality Assessment 1992;58:389-404.

OtherRef
Megargee EI, Mercer SJ, Carbonell JL. MMPI-2 with male and female state and federal prison inmates. Psychological Assessment 1999;11(2): 177-185.
Sirigatti S, Stefanile C. New measure for the study of substance dependency with the MMPI-2: AAS, APS, and MAC-R scales. [Italian]. Bollettino di Psicologia Applicata 1996;217: 17-25.
Svanum S, McGruew J, Ehrmann L. Validity of the substance abuse scales of the MMPI-2 in a college student sample. Journal of Personality Assessment 1994;62(3):427-439.
Greene RC, Weed N, Butcher S, et a. A cross-validation of MMPI-2 substance abuse scales. Journal of Personality Assessment 1992;58:405-410.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20AAS%20/%20Addiction%20Admission%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Addiction Admission Scale (AAS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/02_AAS.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%203%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Addiction Potential Scale (AAS)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1989

Notes
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
This instrument should be administered and scored/interpreted by trained practitioners. Scoring can be done quickly by a clinician (using a scoring key) or a computer. Norms are available for this instrument, and it has also been normed on the following subgroups: normals, substance abusers, and psychiatric patients.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AAS_inst




AccessNo
3

Name
Addiction Potential Scale

Acronym
APS

Developer
Weed, Nathan C.
Butcher, James N.
McKenna, Thomas
Ben-Povath, Yossef S.

Description
The APS is an MMPI-2-based measure of the personality factors underlying the development of addictive disorders. The scale was empirically derived by selecting MMPI-2 items that differentiated alcoholics and drug abusers from psychiatric patients and normals. Scale development procedures followed those used by MacAndrew (1965) in developing the MAC scale except that the MMPI-2 item pool, which incorporated more relevant item content, was used. The APS consists of 39 items and is available in self-administered pencil-and-paper or computer formats. It has a substantial normative base. In clinical settings, the Addiction Potential Scale is commonly used with the Addiction Admission Scale. The APS may also be used in personnel settings to screen job candidates.

Availability
Copyright for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) is held by the Regents of the University of Minnesota 1942, 1943, 1951, 1967 (renewed 1970), 1989.

Contact
Pearson Assessments<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55440<br>
Tel: 800-627-7271<br>
<a href=mailto:pearsonassessments@pearson.com">pearsonassessments@pearson.com</a><br>
<a href="http://pearsonassessments.com">http://pearsonassessments.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Addiction Potential Scale 3.pdf
[NIAAA version]

SourceRef
Weed NC, Butcher JN, McKenna T, Ben-Povath YS. New measures for assessing alcohol and drug abuse problems with the MMPI-2: The APS and AAS. Journal of Personality Assessment 1992;58:389-404.

OtherRef
Clements R, Heintz JM. Diagnostic accuracy and factor structure of the AAS and APS scales of MMPI-2. J Pers Assess 2002;79(3):564-82.
Greene RL, Weed N, Butcher JN, et al. A cross-validation of MMPI-2 substance abuse scales. Journal of Personality Assessment 1992;58:405-410.
Rouse SV, Butcher JN, Miller KB. Assessment of substance abuse in psychotherapy clients: The effectiveness of the MMPI-2 substance abuse scales. Psychological Assessment 1999;11(1):101-107.
Svanum S, McGrew J, Ehrmann L. Validity of the substance abuse scales of the MMPI-2 in a college student sample. Journal of Personality Assessment 1994;62(3):427-439.
Weed NC, Butcher JN, Williams CL. Development of MMPI-A alcohol/drug problem scales. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 1994;55(3):296-302.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20APS%20/%20Addiction%20Potential%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Addiction Potential Scale (APS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/03_APS.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%201%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Addiction Admission Scale (AAS)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

Notes
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
This instrument should be administered by trained practitioners.
Scoring can be done quickly by a clinician (with a scoring key) or a computer. Norms are available for this instrument, and it has also been normed on the following subgroups: normals, alcohol/drug abusers, psychiatric cases.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/APS_inst




AccessNo
11

Name
Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale

Acronym
ADIS

Developer
Moberg, D. Paul
Hahn, Lori

Description
The ADIS is a 13-item self-report instrument designed to differentiate between heavier, more problematic drug users and users less involved in drug use and experiencing fewer problems related to their use. It is essentially a modified version of the Adolescent Alcohol Involvement Scale (AAIS), and is designed to measure drug involvement along a continuum, ranging from no use to severe dependence. It takes approximately five minutes to score and is written at an eighth grade reading level.

Availability
The ADIS is in the public domain. The complete scale and scoring details are available in the source document, Moberg DP and Hahn L (1991).

Contact
D. Paul Moberg, Ph.D.<br>
Center for Health Policy and Program Evaluation<br>
University of Wisconsin at Madison<br>
2710 Marshall Ct.<br>
Madison, WI 53705-2279<br>
tel: 608-263-1304<br>
<a href="mailto:dpmoberg@facstaff.wisc.edu">dpmoberg@facstaff.wisc.edu</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Adolescent_Drug_Involvement_Scale_11.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Adolescent_Drug_Involvement_Scale_11.pdf

SourceRef
Moberg DP, Hahn L. The adolescent drug involvement scale. Journal of Adolescent Chemical Dependency 1991;2(1):75-88.

OtherRef
Winters KC, Stinchfield RD. Current issues and future needs in the assessment of adolescent drug abuse. NIDA Research Monograph 1995;156:146-71. [<a href="http://archives.drugabuse.gov/pdf/monographs/download156.html">free online</a>]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20ADIS%20/%20Adolescent%20Drug%20Involvement%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Adolescent Drug Involvement Scale (ADIS)</a>

SourceInfo
DrugStrategies.com

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
EIB
TIP 31

EnteredBy
pm

EntryDate
200501

Year
1991

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

ValidRely
In a study of 453 adolescents, results demonstrated that the ADIS has acceptable internal consistency (alpha = 0.85) and provided preliminary evidence of validity. This scale was also shown to correlate (.72) with drug use frequency and (.75) with independent rating by clinical staff. When matched up with the frequency of drug use and the ratings that clinical staff gave, the scale correlates with their findings, therefore providing evidence of the validity of this test. See source reference for more details on these psychometric evaluations.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ADIS_inst




AccessNo
18

Name
Alcohol Clinical Index

Acronym
ACI

Developer
Skinner, Harvey A.
Holt, Stephen
Addiction Research Foundation (Ontario)

Description
The ACI is a versatile instrument for use by physicians, nurses and other health professionals to identify alcohol problems among patients (clients). It is composed of four parts: clinical signs (17 items) that are elicited by a physician or nurse; medical history (13 items) that can be completed by the patient; alcohol questionnaire (10 items) that includes a history of drinking during a typical 4-week period in the past 6 months as well as the CAGE screening items; and early indicators and risk factors (14 items). Separate forms are used for recording data for each component.

<p>The ACI is designed to detect varying degrees of alcohol problems (harmful use, abuse, and dependence). A distinct advantage of this instrument is that it combines information from a variety of sources in a practical strategy that increases the accuracy of detection over use of a single source.

Availability
Copyright 1986, Harvey A. Skinner, Stephen Holt, and the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario (now Centre for Addiction & Mental Health (CAMH)). The manual for the ACI is out of print and no longer available for purchase from CAMH (11/2012). <p>ADAI does not have a copy of this scale.

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Clinical Index SAMPLE QUESTIONS 18.pdf [NIAAA - SAMPLE QUESTIONS ONLY]

SourceRef
Skinner HA ; Holt S ; Sheu WJ ; Israel Y. Clinical versus laboratory detection of alcohol abuse: The Alcohol Clinical Index. British Medical Journal 1986;292:1703-1708.
Skinner HA ; Holt S. The Alcohol Clinical Index: Strategies for Identifying Patients With Alcohol Problems. Toronto: Addiction Research Foundation, 1987.

OtherRef
Escobar F ; Espi F ; Canteras M. Diagnostic tests for alcoholism in primary health care: compared efficacy of different instruments. Drug Alcohol Depend 1995 Dec;40(2):151-8.
Alterman AI; Gelfand LA; Sweeney KK. The Alcohol Clinical Index in lower socioeconomic alcohol-dependent men. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1992;16(5):960-3.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Alcohol%20Clinical%20Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol Clinical Index (ACI)</a>
<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Alcohol+Clinical+Index%22[All+Fields]">PubMed Search: Alcohol Clinical Index (ACI)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (no longer included)

InstrumentType
Assessment
Clinician administered interview
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
METRIC

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1986

Notes
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ACI_inst




AccessNo
21

Name
Alcohol Dependence Scale

Acronym
ADS

Developer
Horn, John L.
Skinner, Harvey A.
Wanberg, Kenneth W.
Foster, F. Mark

Description
The ADS provides a quantitative measure of the severity of alcohol dependence consistent with the concept of the alcohol dependence syndrome. The 25 items cover alcohol withdrawal symptoms, impaired control over drinking, awareness of a compulsion to drink, increased tolerance to alcohol, and salience of drink-seeking behavior. It is widely used as a research and clinical tool, and studies have found the instrument to be reliable and valid. Use of the ADS has been reported mostly for clinical adult samples; however, studies have also used the instrument in general population and correctional settings, as well as with adolescents.<br>
The ADS is available in three formats: pencil-and-paper self-administered, interview, or computer self-administered. Since it can be completed in approximately 5-10 minutes, it is particularly useful in clinical settings for screening and case finding in a variety of settings including health care, corrections, general population surveys, workplace, and education. Moreover, the ADS yields a measure of the severity of dependence that is important for treatment planning, especially with respect to the intensity of treatment. Guidelines are given for using the ADS with respect to treatment planning, especially with respect to the level of intervention (e.g. American Society of Addiction Medicine Placement Criteria). The ADS can also be used for basic research studies where a quantitative index is required regarding the severity of alcohol dependence. For clinical research, the ADS is a useful screening and case-finding tool. It is also of value with respect to matching clients with the appropriate intensity of treatment, and for treatment outcome evaluations. The ADS has been found to have excellent predictive value with respect to a DSM diagnosis.

Availability
Copyright 1984, J.L. Horn, H.A. Skinner, K. Wanberg, and F.M. Foster and the Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Research Foundation. A kit with users guide and questionnaires is available for purchase from the <a href="http://www.camh.net/Publications/CAMH_Publications/alcohol_dependence_scale.html">Centre for Addiction and Mental Health</a>. This instrument is also available in French. A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems: A Guide for Clinicians and Researchers / 2nd edition," p. 285-286.

Contact
Harvey Skinner<br>
Department of Public Health Sciences<br>
McMurrich Building<br>
University of Toronto<br>
Toronto, ON Canada M5S 1A8<br>
tel: 416-978-8989<br>
<a href="mailto:harvey.skinner@utoronto.ca">harvey.skinner@utoronto.ca </a>

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Dependence Scale 21.pdf
[NIAAA version]

SourceRef
Skinner HA ; Allen BA. Alcohol dependence syndrome: Measurement and validation. J Abnorm Psychol 1982;91:199-209.
Skinner HA ; Horn JL. Alcohol Dependence Scale: Users Guide. Toronto: Addiction Research Foundation, 1984.

OtherRef
Conway KP; Levy J; Vanyukov M; Chandler R; Rutter J; Swan GE; Neale M. Measuring addiction propensity and severity: the need for a new instrument. [Review] Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010;111(1-2):4-12.
Doyle SR, Donovan DM. A validation study of the Alcohol Dependence Scale. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2009;70(5):689-699.
Saxon AF; Kivlahan DR; Doyle S;Donovan DM. Further validation of the Alcohol Dependence Scale as an index of severity. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 2007;68(1):149-156.
Zywiak, William H; Stout, Robert L; Trefry, Winston B; Glasser, Irene; Connors, Gerard J; Maisto, Stephen A; Westerberg, Verner S. Alcohol relapse repetition, gender, and predictive validity. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2006;30(4):349-353.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Alcohol%20Dependence%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol Dependence Scale (ADS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/10_ADS.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Alcohol+Dependence+Scale%22”>PubMed search: Alcohol Dependence Scale</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Assessment
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview
Screening
Treatment planning
Outcome evaluation

Recommended
NIAAA
APA
EIB
CAMH
METRIC
TIP 16

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1984

Notes
Detailed psychometric information can be found in the APA book. Used in the COMBINE study.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
Only basic training is needed to administer this instrument.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done, using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive"), and construct. Factor analysis has also been done on the ADS.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
Offenders

MatrixRecd
Rotgers article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ADS_inst




AccessNo
28

Name
Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test

Acronym
ASSIST

Developer
Henry-Edwards, Sue
Humeniuk, Rachel
Ali, Robert
Poznyak, Vladimir
Monteiro, Maristela
World Health Organization

Description
The ASSIST is an 8-item questionnaire developed by an international group of substance abuse researchers for the World Health Organization. It's purpose is to detect psychoactive substance use and related problems among primary care patients. The ASSIST provides information about: the substances people have ever used in their lifetime; the substances they have used in the past three months; problems related to substance use; risk of current or future harm; level of dependence; and injecting drug use. Substances addressed include: tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, amphetamine type stimulants, sedatives, hallucinogens, inhalants, opioids, and other drugs.
<p>
The ASSIST is especially designed for international use by health care workers in a range of health care settings. It may also be useful for professionals who work with people at high risk of problems related to substance use. It can be linked to a brief intervention to help high-risk substance users to cut down or stop their drug use and so avoid the harmful consequences of their substance use. The ASSIST extends the WHO efforts that led to development of the AUDIT, with a focus on drugs other than alcohol.
<p>The NIDA-Modified ASSIST is a Web-based interactive tool that guides clinicians through a short series of screening questions and, based on the patient's responses, generates a substance involvement score that suggests the level of intervention needed. The tool also provides links to resources for conducting a brief intervention and treatment referral, if warranted: <a href="http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/screening/">http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/screening/</a>.

Availability
Copyright 2000, World Health Organization. The document may be freely reviewed, abstracted, reproduced, and translated, in part or in whole but it may not be sold or used in conjunction with commercial purposes.

Contact
The ASSIST Project - World Health Organization<br>
1211 Geneva, Switzerland<br>
<a href="http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/activities/assist/en/">http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/activities/assist/en/</a><br>
<a href="mailto:msb@who.int">msb@who.int</a>

InstURL
http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/activities/en/ASSIST%20V.3-%20Guidelines%20for%20use%20in%20primary%20care_TEST.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test 28.pdf [downloaded from WHO site]

SourceRef
WHO ASSIST Working Group. The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST): development, reliability and feasibility. Addiction 2002;97:1183-1194.

OtherRef
Spear SE, et al. Feasibility and acceptability of an audio computer-assisted self-interview version of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in primary care patients. Subst Abuse 2016;37(2):299-305. doi: 10.1080/08897077.2015.1062460
O'Grady KE, Gryczynski J, Mitchell SG, Ondersma SJ, Schwartz RP. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in community health center patients. Am J Addict 2016;25(4):259-63. doi: 10.1111/ajad.12360
McNeely J, Strauss SM, Wright S, et al. Test-retest reliability of a self-administered Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in primary care patients. J Subst Abuse Treat 2014;47(1):93-101. [doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.01.007]
Ali R, Meena S, Eastwood B, et al. Ultra-rapid screening for substance-use disorders: the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST-Lite). Drug Alcohol Depend 2013;132(1-2):352-61. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.03.001
Hides L; Cotton SM; Berger G; et al. The reliability and validity of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in first-episode psychosis. Addict Behav 2009;34(10):821-5.
Humeniuk R, Ali R, Babor TF, Farrell M, Formigoni ML, Jittiwutikam J, de Lacerda RB, Ling W, Marsden J, Monteiro M, Nhiwatiwa S, Pal H, Poznyak V, Simon S. Validation of the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Addiction 2008;103(6):1039-47.
Newcombe DL, Humeniuk RE, Ali R. Validation of the World Health Organization Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST): report of results from the Australian site. Drug Alcohol Review May 2005;24:217-226.
Henry-Edwards S, Humeniuk R, Ali R, Poznyak V, Monteiro M. <a href="http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/activities/en/Draft_The_ASSIST_Guidelines.pdf"> The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST): Guidelines for Use in Primary Care (Draft Version 1.1 for Field Testing). </a>Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003. Formal publication expected in 2005.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20ASSIST%20/%20Alcohol%20Smoking%20%26%20Substance%20Involvement%20Screening%20Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST)</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=Alcohol+Smoking+and+substance+involvement+screening+test”>PubMed search: Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2032%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20714%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">NIDA-Modified Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (NIDA-Modified ASSIST)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference, guidelines

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
WHO

EnteredBy
ns, pm

EntryDate
200505, 200904

Year
2000

InstURLHost
WHO, ASSIST v.3

Notes
From the Guidelines: A companion document “Brief Intervention for Problematic Substance Abuse. A Manual for Use in Primary Care” explains how to link the ASSIST to a brief intervention to help clients reduce or stop their substance use. --- WHERE IS THIS?
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
Scoring instructions can be found in the Guidelines/Manual from WHO (see Availability information, above). This instrument should be administered and scored/interpreted by trained practitioners.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Strong overall results in the reliability and validity studies suggest that the ASSIST is a valid screening test for both males and females, and is valid for cross-cultural use.
RELIABILITY: Test-retest reliability studies were performed in nine countries to assure a culturally diverse pool of participants with different use patterns.
VALIDITY: Results of a study in 7 countries indicate that the ASSIST provides a valid measure of risk for individual substances and for total substance involvement. Scores on the ASSIST were significantly correlated with the MINI-Plus (r=0.76, p<0.01) and the ASI (r=0.84, p<0.01). Discriminative analysis found that the ASSIST could distinguish between those who were low risk substance users or abstainers; those whose patterns of substance use put them at risk of problems, or had already developed problems related to their substance use, or were at risk of developing dependence, and those who were dependent on a substance.

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Dennis

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ASSIST_adai_inst




AccessNo
32

Name
Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test

Acronym
AUDIT

Developer
Babor, Thomas F.
de la Fuente, J.R.
Saunders, J.
Grant, Marcus
World Health Organization

Description
The AUDIT was developed by Tom Babor and others for the World Health Organization to identify persons whose alcohol consumption has become hazardous or harmful to their health. It is a 10-item screening questionnaire with 3 questions on the amount and frequency of drinking, 3 questions on alcohol dependence, and 4 on problems caused by alcohol. All of the questions are scored using a 5-point Likert scale. The AUDIT takes under 2 minutes to administer.
The AUDIT screening procedure in clinical settings is linked to a decision process that includes brief intervention with heavy drinkers, or referral to specialized treatment for patients who show evidence of more serious alcohol involvement. Populations appropriate for a screening program using the AUDIT include primary care, emergency room, surgery, and psychiatric patients; DWI offenders, criminals in court, jail and prison; enlisted men in the Armed Forces; workers encountered in employee assistance programs and industrial settings; and college students.
Another feature of the AUDIT is the optional Clinical Screening Procedure, which consists of two questions about traumatic injury, five items on clinical examination, and a blood test (the serum GGT). The Clinical Screening Procedure does not refer directly to problems with alcohol and may be particularly relevant for defensive patients in situations where alcohol-specific questions cannot be asked with confidence.
The AUDIT is currently being used in a variety of research projects and epidemiological studies. Research guidelines incorporated into the AUDIT manual suggest further research using this instrument.

Availability
Copyright 1992 Thomas Babor and the World Health Organization. The core questionnaire can be reproduced without permission. The AUDIT has been translated into numerous languages, including Japanese, French, Norwegian, Rumanian, Slavic, Spanish, Arabic, and Swahili. The manual (link below) includes detailed administration guidelines, scoring instructions, and a copy of the scale.

Contact
World Health Organization<br>
Division of Mental Health & Prevention of Substance Abuse<br>
CH-1211 <br>
Geneva 27, Switzerland<br>
<a href="mailto:Publications@who.int">Publications@who.int</a>

InstURL
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2001/WHO_MSD_MSB_01.6a.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Alcohol_Use_Disorders_Identification_Test_32.pdf [formatted for SDS]
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Manual and Test 32.pdf [downloaded from WHO]

SourceRef
Babor TF ; de la Fuente JR ; Saunders J ; Grant M. AUDIT: The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Guidelines for use in primary health care. Geneva : World Health Organization, 1992.
Saunders JB ; Aasland OG ; Babor TF ; de la Fuente JR ; Grant M. Development of the Alcohol Use Disorders Screening Test (AUDIT). WHO collaborative project on early detection of persons with harmful alcohol consumption. II. Addiction 1993;88:791-804.

OtherRef
Cortes-Tomas MT, et al. Different versions of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) as screening instruments for underage binge drinking. Drug Alcohol Depend 2016;158:52-9. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.10.033
Celio MA, Vetter-O'Hagen CS, Lisman SA, et al. Integrating field methodology and web-based data collection to assess the reliability of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Drug Alcohol Depend 2011;119(1-2):142-4.
Olthuis JV, Zamboanga BL, Ham LS, Van Tyne K. The utility of a gender-specific definition of binge drinking on the AUDIT. J Am Coll Health 2011;59(4):239-45
Murphy P, Garavan H. Cognitive predictors of problem drinking and AUDIT scores among college students. Drug Alcohol Depend 2011;115(1-2):94-100.
Rist F, Glockner-Risk A, Demmel R. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test revisited: Establishing its structure using nonlinear factor analysis and identifying subgroups of respondents using latent class factor analysis. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2009;100(1-2):71-82.
Aalto M, Alho H, Halme JT, Seppa K. AUDIT and its abbreviated versions in detecting heavy and binge drinking in a general population survey. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2009;103(1-2):25-9.
Fairlie, Anne M; Sindelar, Holly A; Eaton, Cheryl A; Spirito, Anthony. Utility of the AUDIT for screening adolescents for problematic alcohol use in the emergency department. International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health 2006;18(1):115-122.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20AUDIT%20/%20Alcohol%20Use%20Disorders%20Identification%20Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/14_AUDIT.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22alcohol+use+disorders+identification+test%22”>PubMed search: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Name%20ct%20Alcohol+Use+Disorders+Identification+Test+Consumption+Items%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) - Consumption Items</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2028%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Treatment Test (ASSIST)</a>
AUDIT-WR (Wife's Report): see Other Ref (Satyanarayana VA, 2010). The items used in the AUDIT-WR are exactly the same as the AUDIT, except that all items refer to the husband.

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
WHO
TIP 16
TIP 42
METRIC

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

InstURLHost
WHO

Notes
Detailed psychometric information is available in the APA book.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
This instrument should be administered by trained health professionals or paraprofessionals. There is a detailed user's manual (see Availability section, above) and a videotape training module that explains proper administration procedures, scoring, interpretation, and clinical management. The Clinical Screening Procedure is meant to be used by medically trained professionals and it takes 10 minutes to complete when incorporated into other aspects of a medical evaluation. Norms are available for this instrument, and it has also been normed on the subgroups of heavy drinkers and alcoholics.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the AUDIT using measures of test-retest and internal consistency. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults
African Americans
Hispanics
Offenders
College students
DUI/DWI drivers

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AUDIT_adai_inst




AccessNo
33

Name
Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption Items

Acronym
AUDIT-C
AUDIT-3
AUDIT-QF

Developer
Bush, Kristen R.
Kivlahan, Daniel R.
McDonell, Mary B.
Fihn, Stephan D.
Bradley, Katherine A.

Description
The AUDIT-C is an alcohol screening instrument consisting of the first three questions of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test -- those that focus on alcohol consumption. The items ask about frequency of drinking, quantity consumed at a typical occasion, and frequency of heavy episodic drinking (six standard drinks or more on a single occasion). The AUDIT-C is scored on a scale of 0-12 (scores of 0 reflect no alcohol use). In men, a score of 4 or more is considered positive; in women, a score of 3 or more is considered positive. Generally, the higher the score, the more likely it is that the patient’s drinking is affecting his/her health and safety. Most patients who screen positive on the AUDIT-C will be hazardous drinkers who are not alcohol dependent. By using both the AUDIT-C score, and the patient’s history of alcohol treatment, it is possible to identify those most likely to be alcohol dependent.
<p>

In a general population study (Dawson et al, 2005), the AUDIT-C performed best in screening for risk drinking, next best in screening for dependence, and least well in screening for any AUD, both among past-year drinkers and within the total adult population. It may be particularly useful in screening for risk drinking to determine eligibility criterion for Brief Intervention, for which the CAGE, TWEAK, and RAPS4 were not designed. The AUDIT-C is currently used by the US Veterans Administration to detect hazardous drinking.
Short questionnaires perform almost as well as the whole AUDIT when screening risky drinking among men and women. They are recommended for clinical use in busy settings. The AUDIT-QF uses only the first two questions of the AUDIT, and the AUDIT-3 uses the third question of the AUDIT. The AUDIT-C screens well with both genders and the AUDIT-3 performed better with men than women. Cut-off scores need to be tailored based on gender and culture.

Availability
The three AUDIT-C items can be found in the source reference, or extrapolated from a copy of the AUDIT (the AUDIT-C is the first three items of the original AUDIT).

InstURL
http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2001/WHO_MSD_MSB_01.6a.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Alcohol_Use_Disorders_Identification_Test_Consumption_Items_33.pdf [formatted for SDS]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Manual and Test 32.pdf
[WHO manual & test for the AUDIT -- use first three items for AUDIT-C]

SourceRef
Bush K, Kihlavan DR, McConell MB, Fihn SD, Bradley KA. The AUDIT alcohol consumption questions (AUDIT-C): An effective brief screening test for problem drinking. Arch Intern Med 1998;158(16):1789–1795.

OtherRef
Dawson DA, Smith SM, Saha TD, Rubinsky AD, Grant BF. Comparative performance of the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorders. Drug Alcohol Depend 2012;126(3):384-8.
Broyles LM, Gordon AJ, Sereika SM, Ryan CM, Erlen JA. Do words matter? Incongruent responses to inconsistently worded AUDIT-C alcohol screening instruments. Subst Abus. 2011 Oct;32(4):202-9. [<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22014250">Free online</a>]
Meneses-Gaya C; Zuardi AW; Loureiro SR; Crippa JAS. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT): an updated systematic review of psychometric properties. Psychol Neurosci 2009; 2:83-97.
Frank D, DeBenedetti AF, Volk RJ, et al. Effectiveness of the AUDIT-C as a screening test for alcohol misuse in three race/ethnic groups. J Gen Intern Med 2008;23(6):781-787. [<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2517893/">Free online</a>]
Bradley KA; DeBenedetti AF; Volk RJ; Williams EC; Frank D; Kivlahan DR. AUDIT-C as a brief screen for alcohol misuse in primary care. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2007; 31(7):1208-1217.
Dawson, Deborah A; Grant, Bridget F; Stinson, Frederick S. The AUDIT-C: screening for alcohol use disorders and risk drinking in the presence of other psychiatric disorders. Comprehensive Psychiatry 2005;46(6):405-416.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20AUDIT+C%20/%20Alcohol%20Use%20Disorders%20Identification%20Test+-+Consumption*%20C%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption Items (AUDIT-C)</a>
<a href="http://www.queri.research.va.gov/tools/alcohol-misuse/alcohol-faqs.cfm">FAQs about the AUDIT-C for Clinicians</a> (VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative)
<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=audit-c[All+Fields]">PubMed Search: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption Items (AUDIT-C)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2032%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)</a>

SourceInfo
FAQ and Dawson and Karne articles.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
METRIC

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200505

Year
1998

InstURLHost
WHO (for AUDIT-C, use first three items only)

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
Reviewed/updated 201211 (MB)

AdminScoring
AUDIT-C is a self-administered scale, but has also been administered over the telephone and on computer.

ValidRely
The short versions of the AUDIT have satisfactory psychometric properties, sometimes with sensitivity values higher than those of the AUDIT itself (Aalto, 2009). These versions are of great value because they allow for faster screening of alcohol use disorders. For screening of alcohol dependence, better results were found with the adoption of higher cut-off scores.
The AUDIT-3 provided excellent results with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values above 0.83, adequate to screen for alcohol abuse and dependence with the adoption of different cut-off points.
The evaluation of the internal consistency of the AUDIT and its abbreviated versions resulted in excellent alpha values.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AUDIT-C_inst




AccessNo
51

Name
Drug Use Disorders Identification Test

Acronym
DUDIT

Developer
Berman, Anne H.
Bergman Hans
Palmstierna, Tom
Schlyter, Fran

Description
The DUDIT is an 11-item self-administered screening instrument for drug-related problems, giving information on the level of drug intake and selected criteria for substance abuse / harmful use and dependence according to the ICD-10 and DSM-4 diagnostic systems. It was developed to complement the AUDIT; both instruments yield scores on a continuous interval scale and can easily be used in criminal justice, addiction treatment, and psychiatric settings.
<p>
A 54-item version of the DUDIT, the DUDIT-Extended or DUDIT-E, was developed in 2007 and contains additional questions about drug-related consequences for individuals who have been identified by the DUDIT as possibly having a drug problem (<a href="http://bit.ly/DUDIT-E_inst">click here</a> to view the record for the DUDIT-E).

Availability
Copyright Anne H. Berman, Hans Bergman, Tom Palmstierna & Frans Schlyter, Europe English version 1. It is available in English, Norwegian, Portuguese, and Swedish. The DUDIT is in the public domain, but its user-friendly layout is an important part of its integrity and forms the basis for the evaluation of its psychometric properties. Researchers and clinicians interested in translating the DUDIT into other languages are asked to contact the developer for a template. A manual is available from the developer to accompany the clinical use of the DUDIT.<p>

Contact
Anne H. Berman<br>Center for Health Equity Studies (CHESS) <br>Stockholm University<br>Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden <br>tel: +46 8 517 74869. <br> <a href="mailto:anne.h.berman@chess.su.se">anne.h.berman@chess.su.se</a>

InstURL
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=RedirectURL&_method=externObjLink&_locator=url&_issn=03064603&_origin=article&_zone=art_page&_plusSign=%2B&_targetURL=http%253A%252F%252Fwww.emcdda.europa.eu%252Fattachements.cfm%252Fatt_10455_EN_DUDIT.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drug_Use_Disorders_Identification_Test_51.pdf [from source reference]
Print copy in instrument binder.

SourceRef
Berman AH; Bergman H; Palmstierna T; Schlyter F. Evaluation of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) in criminal justice and detoxification settings in a Swedish population sample. European Addiction Research 2005;11(10):22-31.

OtherRef
Voluse AC, Gioia CJ, Sobell LC, Dum M, Sobell MB, Simco ER. Psychometric properties of the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) with substance abusers in outpatient and residential treatment. Addict Behav 2012;37(1):36-41.
Berman AH; Palmstierna T; Kallmen H; Bergman H. The self-report Drug Use Disorders Identification Test-Extended (DUDIT-E): Reliability, validity, and motivational index. J Subst Abuse Treat 2007; 32(4):357-369.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DUDIT%20/%20Drug+Use+Disorders+Identification+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://bit.ly/DUDIT-E_inst">Drug Use Disorders Identification Test--Extended (DUDIT-E)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
EIB

EnteredBy
ns,PM

EntryDate
200503
200705

Year
2002, 2005

InstURLHost
EMCDDA

Notes
Reviewed/Updated 201301 (MB)

AdminScoring
The DUDIT is user-friendly and can easily be used in criminal justice, addiction treatment, and psychiatric settings. Nine questions are scored on 5-point scales ranging from 0-4 and two are scored on 3-point scales with values of 0, 2, and 4. Total scores range from 0-44, with higher scores suggestive of a more severe drug problem.

ValidRely
The DUDIT has been found to be a psychometrically sound drug abuse screening measure with high convergent validity when compared to similar measures (like the DAST-10), and to have a Cronbach's alpha of .94, with good sensitivity and specificity.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DUDIT_inst




AccessNo
55

Name
Brief Symptom Inventory

Acronym
BSI

Developer
Derogatis, Leonard R.
Melisaratos, Nick

Description
The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) is a multidimensional symptom inventory designed to reflect psychological symptom patterns of psychiatric and medical patients. This 53-item self-report is the short form of the SCL-90-R instrument. Like the SCL-90-R instrument, the BSI can be useful in initial evaluation of patients at intake as an objective method of screening for psychological problems. It is especially appropriate in clinical situations where debilitation results in reduced attention and endurance, in research with limited interview schedules, and in outpatient clinics where testing procedures demand brevity. The BSI instrument is also frequently used in measuring patient progress during treatment or in the assessment of treatment outcomes. <p>
This instrument is useful in tracking changes in reported psychopathology over time. It gives specific indicators of a variety of forms of psychopathology and overall relative severity of psychopathology.<p>
The BSI 18 (Derogatis, 2000) is a brief, easy-to-administer, abbreviated version of the BSI and the SCL. It takes 4 minutes to administer and complete, and measures somatization, depression, and anxiety in both inpatient and community settings. It is used primarily to monitor mental health status during hospitalization and aftercare for patients with chronic conditions.

Availability
Use of this instrument is regulated by <a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com">Pearson Assessments</a>. It is available in Spanish and French for Canada, and in other languages. See web site for pricing.

Contact
Pearson Assessments
<a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/bsi.htm">http://www.pearsonassessments.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Brief Symptom Inventory 55.pdf
[formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Derogatis LR ; Melisaratos N. The Brief Symptom Inventory: An introductory report. Psychological Medicine 1983;13(3):595-605.
Derogatis, L.R. (2000). Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18). San Antonio, TX: Pearson.

OtherRef
Thomas ML. Rewards of bridging the divide between measurement and clinical theory: demonstration of a bifactor model for the Brief Symptom Inventory. Psychol Assess 2012;24(1):101-13.
Wiesner M, Chen V, Windle M, Elliott MN, Grunbaum JA, Kanouse DE, Schuster MA. Factor structure and psychometric properties of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 in women: A MACS approach to testing for invariance across racial/ethnic groups. Psychol Assess 2010;22(4):912-22
Long CG; Hollin CR. Assessing comorbid substance use in detained psychiatric patients: issues and instruments for evaluating treatment outcome. Substance Use and Misuse 2009; 44(11):1602-1641.
Long JD, Harring JR, Brekke JS, Test MA, Greenberg J. Longitudinal construct validity of Brief Symptom Inventory subscales in schizophrenia. Psychol Assess 2007;19(3):298-308.
Asner-Self KK; Schreiber JB; Marotta SA. A cross-cultural analysis of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology 2006;12(2):367-375.
Royse D, Druge K. Screening drug abuse clients with the Brief Symptom Inventory. International Journal of the Addictions 1984;19:849-857.




Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20BSI%20/%20Brief%20Symptom%20Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)</a>
<a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/bsi.htm">Pearson Assessments' BSI page</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=%22Brief%20Symptom%20Inventory%22%20[ti]”>PubMed search for articles about the use or psychometrics of the BSI</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://bit.ly/SCL-90-R_inst">Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)</a>

SourceInfo
Pearson Assessments
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Outcome evaluation
Psychological assessment

Recommended
APA
NIDA-CTN-CAB
EIB

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503, 201105

Year
1983

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
WSIPP discussed this measure (BSI-18) as one which may assist a clinician in the investigation process for involuntary treatment.
http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/11-01-3402.pdf
Reviewed/Updated 201301 (MB)

AdminScoring
The BSI requires only a brief introduction and a minimal amount of instruction to ensure validity. Completion time is 8-10 minutes.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Validity is supported by high correlation with parent instrument (SCL-90).

Status
public

Population
Adults
College students

MatrixRecd
Megan
Rotgers article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BSI_inst




AccessNo
58

Name
CAGE

Acronym
CAGE

Developer
Ewing, John A.

Description
The CAGE is a 4-item, relatively nonconfrontational questionnaire for detection of alcoholism, usually phrased as "have you ever" but may be focused to delineate past or present alcohol problems. Because it requires less than one minute for administration, it is a useful bedside clinical desk instrument and has become the favorite of family practice physicians, general internists, and nurses. The CAGE has much less potential for most research uses than for clinical use.
<ul>
1. Have you felt the need to <b>C</b>ut down on your drinking?<br>
2. Do you feel <b>A</b>nnoyed by people complaining about your drinking?<br>
3. Do you ever feel <b>G</b>uilty about your drinking?<br>
4. Do you ever drink an <b>E</b>ye-opener in the morning to relive the shakes?
</ul>
A common criticism of the CAGE is that is not gender-sensitive, and women who are problem drinkers are less likely to screen positive than men. Also, it identifies alcohol-dependent persons, but may not identify binge drinkers. Finally, the CAGE asks about "lifetime" experience rather than current drinking, so a person who no longer drinks may screen positive unless the clinician directs the questions to focus on a more current timeframe.
<p>
The CAGE is available in the following formats: pencil-and-paper self-administered, interview, and computer self-administered. It is easy to learn, easy to remember, and easy to replicate.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain. No permission is necessary unless used in a profit-making endeavor. The CAGE has been translated into Flemish, French, Hebrew, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, and Spanish. A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems: A Guide for Clinicians and Researchers / 2nd edition," p.332-334.

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/inscage.htm

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\CAGE 58.pdf
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/CAGE_58.pdf [formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Ewing JA. Detecting alcoholism: The CAGE questionnaire. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association 1984;252:1905-1907. [contains a copy of the instrument]

OtherRef
Geneste J, Pereira B, Arnaud B, et al. CAGE, RAPS4, RAPS4-QF and AUDIT screening tests for men and women admitted for acute alcohol intoxication to an emergency department: Are standard thresholds appropriate? Alcohol Alcoholism 2012;47(3):273-81
Skogen JC, Overland S, Knudsen AK, Mykletun A. Concurrent validity of the CAGE questionnaire. The Nord-Trondelag Health Study. Addict Behav 2011;36(4):302-7.
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
Dhalla S, Kopec JA. The CAGE questionnaire for alcohol misuse: A review of reliability and validity studies. Clin Invest Med 2007;30(1):33-41.
Bradley KA, Bush KR, McDonell MB, Malone T, Fihn SD, the Ambulatory Care Quality Improvement Project (ACQUIP). Screening for problem drinking: Comparison of CAGE and AUDIT. J Gen Intern Med 1998;13(6):379-88.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CAGE%20/%20CAGE%20Questionnaire%20!%20home%20cage%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: CAGE</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/16_CAGE.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=CAGE[All+Fields]+OR+(Cut-down[All+Fields]+AND+Annoyed[All+Fields]+AND+(%22guilt%22[MeSH+Terms]+OR+%22guilt%22[All+Fields])+AND+Eye-opener[All+Fields])”>PubMed search: CAGE</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20321%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CAGE - Adapted to Include Drugs (CAGE-AID)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20379%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Reduce Annoyed Guilty Start (RAGS)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
APA
TIP 16
TIP 42
METRIC

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1984

InstURLHost
NIAAA

Notes
Detailed psychometric information can be found in the APA book.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
Reviewed/Updated 201301 (MB)

AdminScoring
No training is required for the administration of this instrument. It should be administered by a professional or technician.
Scoring of the CAGE is instantaneous. Each yes response is scored as 1. A score of 2 of higher is considered clinically significant and should raise the clinician's index of suspicion that the individual has an alcohol-related problem or diagnosis. A cut point of 1 detects approximately 90% of those with an alcohol-related disorder, with 48% false-positive diagnoses. Norms are available for this instrument.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on this instrument using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
College students

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAGE_inst




AccessNo
59

Name
Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test

Acronym
CUDIT
CUDIT-R

Developer
Adamson, Simon J.
Sellman, J. Douglas

Description
The CUDlT is a 10-question, self-report screening instrument employing a 5-point Likert Scale. It is a modification of the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). The instrument was recently developed and its ability to accurately assess cannabis abuse or dependence was tested on a sample of alcohol-dependent out-patients (n=53) who reported some use of cannabis in the past 6 months. The first 2 questions ask about current use while the other 8 refer to the past 6 months. The maximum score possible is 40 with a cut-off of 8 demonstrating a positive predictive value of 81.8% and sensitivity of 73.3 %.<p>

The original paper about the CUDIT cited the need for further development of the instrument, based on several limitations. In 2009, the CUDIT was revised (CUDIT-R) to be shorter (down from ten items to eight). The CUDIT-R exhibits improved psychometric properties (Adamson, 2010) over the original scale and appears well suited to the task of screening for problematic cannabis use. The CUDIT-R contains 8 items, comprising 4 items from the original 10-item CUDIT and 4 new items. It may also have potential as a brief routine outcome measure.

Availability
The CUDIT and CUDIT-R are in the public domain and may be used and reproduced without charge.

Contact
Mr. Simon Adamson<br>
National Addiction Centre (formerly NCTD)<br>
Department of Psychological Medicine<br>
Christchurch School of Medicine & Health Sciences<br>
University of Otago<br>
4 Oxford Terrace, PO Box 4345<br>
Christchurch New Zealand<br>
tel: 64-3-364-0480<br>
<a href="mailto:simon.adamson@otago.ac.nz">simon.adamson@otago.ac.nz</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test Revised 59.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Cannabis_Use_Disorders_Identification_Test_59.pdf (Original CUDIT)

http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test Revised 59.pdf (CUDIT-R)

SourceRef
Adamson SJ ; Sellman JD. A prototype screening instrument for cannabis use disorder: the Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT) in an alcohol-dependent clinical sample. Drug and Alcohol Review 22, 309-315, 2003.
Annaheim B, Rehm J, Gmel G. How to screen for problematic cannabis use in population surveys: An evaluaiton of the Cannabis Use Disorders Test (CUDIT) in a Swiss sample of adolescents and young adults. European Addiction Research 14(4):190-197, 2008.
Adamson SJ; Kay-Lambkin FJ; Baker AL; Lewin TJ; Thornton L; Kelly BJ; Sellman JD. An improved brief measure of cannabis misuse: The Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test-Revised (CUDIT-R). Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010 110(1-2):137-143.

OtherRef
Piontek D; Kraus L; Klempova D. Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties. Substance Abuse Treatment Prevention and Policy 2008;3:25.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CUDIT%20/%20Cannabis+Use+Disorders+Identification+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test (CUDIT)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2003
2009

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Updated as per email from Simon Adamson, 20100311

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CUDIT_inst




AccessNo
63

Name
Client Substance Index

Acronym
CSI

Developer
Moore, David D.

Description
This 113-item test is based on Jellinek's 28 symptoms of drug dependence. Scores on the CSI reflect the degree of drug dependence, ranging from no problem, to misuse of substances, to chemical dependency. CSI scores have been shown to discriminate normal from drug treatment samples.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. Information on obtaining a copy of this scale unavailable.

SourceRef
Moore DD. A psychometric study of adolescent substance abuse: internal consistency and validity studies of the Client Substance Index. Dissertation Abstracts International 1992;53(1-B):569-570.

OtherRef
James WH; Moore DD. Screening for substance use in adolescents: Outcomes of assessments with alternative school students. Subst Abuse 1995;16(1):21-29.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Client+Substance+Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Client Substance Index (CSI)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2064%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Client Substance Index-Short Form (CSI-S)</a>

SourceInfo
DrugStrategies.com

InstrumentType
Assessment
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CSI_inst




AccessNo
64

Name
Client Substance Index - Short Form

Acronym
CSI-S

Developer
Thomas, D.W.

Description
The CSI-S was developed and evaluated as part of a larger Substance Abuse Screening Protocol through the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This tool is a 15-item, yes/no self-report instrument that was adapted from Moore's multi-scale Client Substance Index. The objective of this brief screen is to identify juveniles within the court system who are in need of additional drug abuse assessment. When tested again and again, the results are comparable (coefficient alpha =.84-.87). The test also has the ability to discriminate groups defined according to the severity of their criminal offenses.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The CSI-S instrument and manual can be downloaded for free from the NCJJ.

InstURL
http://www.ncjj.org/pdf/SubstanceAbuseScreening.pdf

SourceRef
Thomas DW. Substance Abuse Screening Protocol for the Juvenile Courts. Pittsburgh: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 1990.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CSI%20/%20Client+Substance+Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Client Substance Index (CSI)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2063%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Client Substance Index (CSI)</a>

SourceInfo
DrugStrategies.com

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1990

InstURLHost
National Center for Juvenile Justice

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CSI-S_inst




AccessNo
70

Name
Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV

Acronym
CAPS

Developer
Blake, Dudley D.

Description
Developed at the National Center for PTSD, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) has become the “gold standard” for assessing posttraumatic stress disorder in individuals over age 15. This user-friendly structured interview is ideal for screening, differential diagnosis, confirmation of a PTSD diagnosis, or identifying Acute Stress Disorder. Completion time for the full CAPS interview is 45-60 minutes.
The CAPS consists of 30 carefully worded interview questions that target DSM-IV criteria for PTSD without leading the respondent. The interview gives a clear picture of symptom severity and sufficient information to determine whether a current or lifetime diagnosis of PTSD is indicated. In addition, the CAPS includes a protocol for assessing Criterion A, a diagnostic requirement that the patient has experienced at least one traumatic event involving both life threat or serious injury and an overwhelming emotional response. The scale also offers an optional Life Events Checklist, with just 17 items, that can be completed by the patient to help identify precipitating traumatic events.
Although initially developed with combat veterans, the CAPS has been successfully used with many veteran, civilian and refugee trauma populations, including victims of rape, car accidents, incest, torture, cancer, and the Holocaust. It has gained international acceptance because it is psychometrically sound and because it is flexible and easy to use. Supported by 10 years of research, the CAPS is a highly useful and flexible tool for evaluating PTSD.

Availability
The CAPS is in the public domain. However, because of the American Psychological Association's ethical guidelines on psychological testing, a master's degree in a clinical discipline is required for use. <a href="http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/ncptsd-instrument-request-form.asp">Register to obtain a copy here</a>.Training workshops are available by contacting the National Center for PTSD. The CAPS has been translated into Dutch, French, German, Japanese, and other languages.

Contact
National Center for PTSD (116D)<br>
VA Medical Center and Regional Office Center<br>
215 North Main St.<br>
White River Junction, VT 05009<br>
<a href="mailto:ptsd@dartmouth.edu">ptsd@dartmouth.edu</a>

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Clinician_Administered_PTSD_Scale_for_DSM_IV_70.pdf [formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Blake DD, Weathers FW, Nagy LN et.al. A clinician rating scale for assessing current and lifetime PTSD: the CAPS-1. Behavior Therapist 1990;18:187-188.

OtherRef
Pupo MC, Jorge MR, Schoedl AF, Bressan RA, Andreoli SB, Mello MF, de Jesus Mari J. The accuracy of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) to identify PTSD cases in victims of urban violence. Psychiatry Res 2011;185(1-2):157-60
Harrington T ; Newman E. The psychometric utility of two self-report measures of PTSD among women substance users. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(12):2788-2798.
Weathers FW ; Keane TM ; Davidson JR. Clinician-administered PTSD scale : a review of the first ten years of research. Depress Anxiety 2001;13(3):132-56.
Blake DD ; Weathers FW ; Nagy LM ; Kaloupek DG ; Gusman FD ; Charney DS ; Keane TM. The development of a Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. J Trauma Stress 1995;8(1):75-90.
Blanchard EB ; Hickling EJ ; Taylor AE ; Forneris CA ; Loos W ; Jaccard J. Effects of varying scoring rules of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder in motor vehicle accident victims. Behav Res Ther 1995;33(4):471-5.
Hoven JE ; van der Ploeg HM ; Klaarenbeek MT ; Bramsen I ; Schreuder JN ; Rivero VV. The assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder: with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale : Dutch results. J Clin Psychol 1994;50(3):325-340.

Resources
<a href="http://www.wpspublish.com/Inetpub4/w01.htm">Western Psychological Services</a>
<a href="http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/caps.asp">National Center for PTSD page about the CAPS</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Clinician+Administered+PTSD+Scale%22”>PubMed search: Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20403%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for Children and Adolescents (CAPS-CA)</a>

SourceInfo
Western Psychological Services
APA
National Center for PTSD

InstrumentType
Screening
Diagnostic test
Clinician-administered interview
Psychological assessment

Recommended
APA

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1990

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
Clinician administered.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAPS_inst




AccessNo
76

Name
College Alcohol Problems Scale - Revised

Acronym
CAPS-r

Developer
O'Hare, Tom

Description
The CAPS-r is an 8-item self-report scale (the original CAPS had 10 items). In clinical settings, the CAPS-r can be used as an initial screen to estimate the relative frequency with which clients experience drinking-related personal and social problems. As part of a survey or evaluation instrument battery, the CAPS-r can provide a brief, valid, reliable, and useful way to capture the relative frequency of personal and social consequences of drinking in college students. It takes approximately 2-3 minutes to administer this instrument and it can be scored immediately. The CAPS-r is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered and interview formats.

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted. There is no cost for use. A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems: A Guide for Clinicians and Researchers / 2nd edition," p.340-342.

Contact
Tom O'Hare, Ph.D.<br>
Boston College GSSW<br>
202 McGuinn Hall<br>
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167-3807<br>
<a href="mailto:oharet@bc.edu">oharet@bc.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\College Alcohol Problems Scale 76.pdf

SourceRef
Maddock JE ; Laforge RG ; Rossi JS ; O'Hare T. The College Alcohol Problems Scale. Addictive Behaviors 2001;26: 385-398.

OtherRef
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
O'Hare T. Measuring problem drinking in first time offenders: development and validation of the College Alcohol Problem Scale (CAPS). Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 1997;14: 383-387.
O'Hare T. Replicating the College Alcohol Problem Scale (CAPS) with college first offenders. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 1998;43: 75-82.
O'Hare T ; Sherrer MV. Drinking problems, alcohol expectancies and drinking contexts in college first offenders. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 1998;43: 31-45.
Talbott LL; Umstattd MR; Usdan SL; Martin RR; Geiger BF. Validation of the College Alcohol Problem Scale-revised (CAPS-r) for use with non-adjudicated first-year students. Addictive Behaviors 2009; 34(5):471-473.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CAPS%20/%20College%20Alcohol%20Problem*%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: College Alcohol Problems Scale (CAPS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/19_CAPSr.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1997

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Norms are available for this instrument -- it was normed on general college populations. The original CAPS (10 items) was normed on college first offenders. Distributions are based on limited college studies and data can be used to tentatively benchmark "average" problems.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the CAPS-r using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAPS-r_inst




AccessNo
77

Name
Common Alcohol Logistics Scale

Acronym
CAL

Developer
Davis, Leo J.
Offord, Kenneth P.
Colligan, Robert C.
Morse, Robert M.

Description
The CAL was developed from 33 items embedded in the item pool of the original MMPI. It was developed specifically for alcoholism screening among both female and male medical patients. Items were selected by logistic regression and have various item-weights attached to scorable responses.

Availability
This instrument is no longer available.

SourceRef
Davis LJ; Offord KP; Colligan RC; Morse RM. The CAL: An MMPI alcoholism scale for general medical patients. Journal of Clinical Psychology 1991; 47(5): 632-646.

OtherRef
Colligan RC; Davis LJ; Morse RM; Offord KP. Screening medical patients for alcoholism with the MMPI: A comparison of seven scales. Journal of Clinical Psychology 1988;4: 582-592.
Colligan RC; Offord KP; Morse RM; Davis LJ. Alcoholism screening with direct and indirect measured, the combined use of the CAL scale and the SAAST. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 1997;12(4): 300-301.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CAL%20/%20Common+Alcohol+Logistics+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Common Alcohol Logistics Scale (CAL)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (no longer included)

InstrumentType
Screening

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1991

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAL_inst




AccessNo
80

Name
Composite Quantity Frequency Index

Acronym
CQF

Developer
Polich, J.M.
Orvis, B.R.

Description
QF methods, such as the Composite Quantity Frequency Index, are among the earliest measures to assess alcohol consumption. These methods, of which there are many variants, are known as estimation formulae because they ask people to report their "average" consumption pattern -- to estimate (i.e. average) on how many days per week they drank, and how much they typically consumed on a given drinking day. Drinking parameters (e.g. total amount consumed, mean number of drinks per day) are calculated based on the aggregate questions (e.g. "How many days on average -- in a specified time interval -- did you drink beer, and when you drank beer, on average how many beers did you drink?"). Such methods usually do not inquire about occasional high- and low-drinking days, and many do not correct for days when more than one type of alcoholic beverage was consumed (e.g. three beers and two glasses of wine on the same day). QF methods are most useful when time is limited and information about atypical drinking is not required. Although variants of QF methods have been designed to have more clinical utility (i.e. to include questions addressing multiple beverage use and extremes of drinking), these modified QF procedures can take 10 to 15 minutes to collect drinking information over the past 90 days. This negates the major advantage of QF methods -- their brevity.

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted and can be used freely. ADAI does not have a complete copy of this scale; the link below is for a sample question version only.

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/cqfi.pdf

ADAI
Sample questions: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Composite Quantity Frequency Index SAMPLE QUESTIONS 80.pdf [NIAAA version]

SourceRef
Polich JM; Orvis BR. Alcohol Problems: Patterns and Prevalence in the U.S. Air Force. Santa Monica, CA : The Rand Corporation, 1979.

OtherRef
Lemmens P; Tan ES; Knibbe RA. Measuring quantity and frequency of drinking in a general population survey: A comparison of 5 indices. J Stud Alcohol 1992;53:476-486.
Midanik LT. Comparing usual quantity/frequency and graduated frequency scales to assess yearly alcohol consumption: Results from the 1990 United States National Alcohol Survey. Addiction 1994;89:407-412.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CQF%20/%20Composite+Quantity+Frequency+Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Composite Quantity Frequency Index (CQF)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/52A_QF.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Assessment
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1979

InstURLHost
NIAAA (sample questions only)

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CQF_inst




AccessNo
91

Name
Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Inventory

Acronym
DALI

Developer
Rosenberg, Stanley D.
Drake, Robert E.
Wolford, George L.
Mueser, Kim T.
Oxman, Thomas E.
Vidaver, Robert M.
Carrieri, Karen L.
Luckoor, Ravindra

Description
The Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Instrument (DALI), is a brief, easy to use, 18-item screening tool designed to assess substance abuse among individuals with mental illness. Items in the scale cover alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use, and ask questions such as "how much money have you spent on [drug] in the last 6 months?" or "how long was your last period of voluntary abstinence from [drug]?" The instrument takes about six minutes to administer and is tailored for psychiatric patients in acute-care settings. The DALI exhibits high classification accuracy for both alcohol and drug (cannabis and cocaine) use disorders. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the DALI functioned significantly better than traditional instruments for both alcohol and drug use disorders.
This instrument is satisfactory for use with detained psychiatric patients.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain.

Contact
Stanley D. Rosenberg <br>
<a href="mailto:Stanley.D.Rosenberg@Dartmouth.edu">Stanley.D.Rosenberg@Dartmouth.edu</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Dartmouth_Assessment_of_Lifestyle_Inventory_91.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Dartmouth_Assessment_of_Lifestyle_Inventory_91.pdf
Print copy in instrument binder.

SourceRef
Rosenberg SD; Drake RE; Wolford GL; et al. Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Instrument (DALI): A substance use disorder screen for people with severe mental illness. Am J Psychiatry 1998; 155(2):232-238. <a href="http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/155/2/232">Download article free online</a>.

OtherRef
Deady M. A Review of Screening, Assessment and Outcome Measures for Drug and Alcohol Settings. NSW Health Department, 2009, 225p. Free online: <a href="http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=172701">http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=172701</a>.
Ford P. An evaluation of the Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Inventory and the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire for use among detained psychiatric inpatients. Addiction 2003;98(1):111-118.
Osher FC, Goldberg RW, Goodman LA, Rosenberg SD. Hepatitis C and individuals with serious mental illnesses. Psychiatric Annals 2003;33(6):394-400.
Long CG; Hollin CR. Assessing comorbid substance use in detained psychiatric patients: issues and instruments for evaluating treatment outcome. Substance Use and Misuse 2009; 44(11):1602-1641.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DALI%20/%20Dartmouth%20Assessment%20Of%20Lifestyle%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Inventory (DALI)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference and a copy of the instrument itself

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening
Assessment
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1998

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
name changed from Dartmouth Assessment of Lifestyle Instrument to Inventory

AdminScoring
There are 10 questions on alcohol use disorder and 8 questions on drug use disorder. A high positive score in the DALI gives a high probabliity that the patient meets DSM-IV cirteria for recent substance use disorder. Scores on alcohol scale range from -4 to +6. Cut off score = 2. Alcohol use disorders scores on drug scale range -4 to +4. Cut off score= -1 or above. The test takes less than 5 minutes to complete. The DALI is sensitive to missing data.

ValidRely
Valid and reliable

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DALI_inst




AccessNo
99

Name
Drinking Context Scale

Acronym
DCS

Developer
O'Hare, Tom

Description
The DCS measures the self-reported likelihood of drinking excessively in three contexts: convivial circumstances, intimate circumstances, and coping with negative emotion. In clinical settings, the DCS can be used as an initial screen to estimate the likelihood of young persons drinking excessively in certain circumstances, an important consideration since the consequences of youthful problem drinking are highly dependent on contest. Researchers will find the DCS suitable for testing hypotheses about drinking behavior and drinking context. As part of a survey or evaluation instrument battery, the DCS-23 and DCS-9 both provide a brief, valid, reliable, and useful way to capture high-risk drinking in college-age young people.
The original version has 23 items; there is also a 9-item version. This instrument takes approximately 5-10 minutes to administer and is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered or interview format.

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted.

Contact
Tom O'Hare, Ph.D.<br>
Boston College GSSW<br>
202 McGuinn Hall<br>
Chestnut Hill, MA 02167-3807<br>
<a href="mailto:oharet@bc.edu">oharet@bc.edu</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drinking_Context_Scale_99.pdf

ADAI
A complete copy of this instrument (both the 23-item and 9-item versions) can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems" (HV 5279 N38 A8 2003 REF INST), p. 361-362.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drinking_Context_Scale_99.pdf
[from NIAAA, 23- and 9-item versions]

SourceRef
O'Hare T. Measuring excessive alcohol use in college drinking contexts : the Drinking Context Scale. Addictive Behaviors 1997;22:469-477.

OtherRef
O'Hare T. The Drinking Context Scale : a confirmatory analysis. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2001;20:129-136.
O'Hare T. Alcohol expectancies and excessive drinking contexts in young adults. Social Work Research 1998;22:44-50.
O'Hare T ; Sherrer MV. Drinking problems, alcohol expectancies and drinking contexts in college first offenders. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 1997;43:31-45.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DCS%20/%20Drinking+Context+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drinking Context Scale (DCS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/25_DCS.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1997

InstURLHost
ADAI (23- and 9-item versions)

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument. Any professional can administer the DCS.
Scoring can be done immediately by either the respondent or a professional. Norms are not available for this instrument. It has been used primarily with college students. Subscale means can provide a benchmark for comparison. See source reference for subscales.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the DCS using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DCS_inst




AccessNo
105

Name
Drug Abuse Screening Test

Acronym
DAST

Developer
Skinner, Harvey A.

Description
The Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST) was designed to provide a brief instrument for clinical and non-clinical screening to detect drug abuse or dependence disorders. It is most useful in settings in which seeking treatment for drug use problems is not the patient's stated goal. The DAST provides a quantitative index of the severity of problems related to drug abuse other than alcohol. DAST scores are highly diagnostic with respect to a DSM diagnosis of psychoactive drug dependence. The DAST is available in both 20-item and 10-item formats; an Adolescent version is also available.

<p>In addition, the DAST provides a general measure of lifetime problem severity that can be used to guide further inquiry into drug-related problems and to help determine treatment intensity. It takes about 5 minutes to administer the DAST-20 and 2 minutes to score the DAST-10.

<p>NOTE re: history and alternate names: The orginal measure had 28 items and was adapted from the MAST. The 20-item version of the DAST was found to have psychometric properties comparable with the 28-item version, and is now commonly referred to as the DAST, or DAST-20. The DAST is also known as the Drug Use Questionnaire (DUQ) (DUQ-20 and DUQ-10).

<p>The DAST-10 was selected in 2012 by a group of researchers from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to serve as the recommended assessment tool for use in general medical settings. For more information, see <a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/display/819.htm">http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/display/819.htm</a>.

Availability
© Copyright 1982 by Harvey A. Skinner, PhD, and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. You may reproduce this instrument for non-commercial use (clinical, research, training purposes) as long as you credit the author Dr. Harvey A. Skinner, Dean, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada. Email: <a href="mailto:harvey.skinner@yorku.ca">harvey.skinner@yorku.ca</a>

Contact
Dr. Harvey A. Skinner, Dean, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, Canada. <a href="mailto:harvey.skinner@yorku.ca">harvey.skinner@yorku.ca</a>.

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drug_Abuse_Screening_Test_105.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drug_Abuse_Screening_Test_105.pdf [DAST-20]
Print copy in binders (source reference with scale items).

SourceRef
Skinner HA. The Drug Abuse Screening Test. Addict Behav 1982;7(4):363-367.

OtherRef
Giguere CE, Potvin S. The Drug Abuse Screening Test preserves its excellent psychometric properties in psychiatric patients evaluated in an emergency setting. Addict Behav 2016;64:165-170. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.08.042
Sakai LM, Esposito TJ, Ton-That HH, et al. Comparison of objective screening and self-report for alcohol and drug use in traumatically injured patients. Alcohol Treat Q 2012;30:433-442. [DAST is the self-report tool used for comparison]
Grekin ER, Svikis DS, Lam P, Connors V, LeBreton JM, et al. Drug use during pregnancy: Validating the Drug Abuse Screening Test against physiological measures. Psychol Addict Behav 2010;24(4):719-723. [about the DAST-10]
Cassidy CM, Schmitz N, Malla A. Validation of the alcohol use disorders identification test and the drug abuse screening test in first episode psychosis. Can J Psychiatry 2008;53(1):26-33.
Yudko E; Lozhkina O; Fouts A. A comprehensive reivew of the psychometric properties of the Drug Abuse Screening Test. J Subst Abuse Treat 2007;32(2):189-198.
Staley D, El-Guebaly N. Psychometric properties of the Drug Abuse Screening Test in a psychiatric patient population. Addict Behav 1990;15:257-264.



Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Drug+Abuse+Screening+Test%20/%20DAST%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST)</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22drug+abuse+screening+test%22”>PubMed search: Drug Abuse Screening Test</a>

RelatedInst
Drug Abuse Screening Test, Short Form (DAST-10)

SourceInfo
source reference
APA, p. 464-5

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
APA
EIB
TIP 16
TIP 42
CAMH

EnteredBy
MB, PM, NS

EntryDate
200503

Year
1982

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Not on APA CD-ROM. Detailed psychometric information can be found in the APA book.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
CONFIRMED copyright info from Harvey Skinner, April 2011.

AdminScoring
No special training is required for administration of this instrument. (APA)

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
The DAST appears to be a useful instrument for measuring drug involvement and problems associated with the abuse of drugs other than alcohol. It evidenced high internal consistency reliability and good item-total scale correlations in a diverse psychiatric patient population. A diagnostic validity analysis of the DAST indicated that it attained a maximum overall accuracy of 89% in classifying patients according to DSM-III Substance Abuse diagnosis. It also has high sensitivity and specificity. Details on these psychometric measures can be found in the Staley, el-Guebaly 1990 article.

Status
public

Population
Adults
College students
Pregnant women

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DAST_inst




AccessNo
106

Name
Drug and Alcohol Problem Quick Screen

Acronym
DAP Quick Screen

Developer
Schwartz, Richard H.
Wirtz, Philip W.

Description
This 30-item screening questionnaire, written at the sixth grade reading level, has a yes/no/uncertain response format. The DAP was tested in a pediatric setting (Schwartz & Wirtz, 1990), in which the authors report that about 15% of the respondents said yes to 6 or more items. From this, they determine the cut-off score for "problem" drug use to be inclusive of 6 or more responses of yes to the items on the scale. The items contribute to the score, however the validity and reliability of this test are not available.

Availability
This measure is in the public domain.

Contact
Richard H. Schwartz, M.D.<br>
410 Maple Avenue West<br>
Vienna, VA 22180<br>
tel: 703-338-2244

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drug_and_Alcohol_Problem_Quick_Screen_106.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Drug_and_Alcohol_Problem_Quick_Screen_106.pdf

SourceRef
Schwartz RH; Wirtz PW. Potential substance abuse detection among adolescent patients. Using the Drug and Alcohol Problem (DAP) Quick Screen, a 30-item questionnaire. Clinical Pediatrics 1990;29:38-43.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DAP+Quick+Screen%20/%20Drug+%26+ Alcohol+Problem+%26+Quick+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug and Alcohol Problem Quick Screen (DAP Quick Screen)</a>

SourceInfo
DrugStrategies.org; EIB

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
EIB
TIP 31

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1990

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
See EIB record

AdminScoring
10 minutes to complete and score.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DAP-Quick_inst




AccessNo
110

Name
Drug Use Screening Inventory - Revised

Acronym
DUSI-R

Developer
Tarter, Ralph E.

Description
The DUSI-R measures severity of problems in 10 domains : (1) substance abuse, (2) psychiatric disorder, (3) behavior problems, (4) school adjustment, (5) health status, (6) work adjustment, (7) peer relations, (8) social competency, (9) family adjustment, and (10) leisure/recreation. It documents drug and alcohol use, preferred substance, and substance with which users report the greatest problem. The DUSI-R also contains a "lie scale," used for reliability purposes to ensure honesty in the respondents or identify inconsistencies within the responses.
The output is in the form of two profiles: (1) a profile indexing absolute severity of disorder (0 to 100 percent); and (2) a relative problem index ranking the order of severity in the 10 domains. An overall problem density score, ranging from 0 to 100 percent, documents severity of maladjustment. The DUSI-R is used for measuring current status, identifying areas in need of prevention, and evaluating the magnitude of change after a treatment intervention. It is particularly useful for evaluating known or suspected alcohol/drug users, matching specific treatments to specific problems, and identifying youth in need of prevention.
In clinical settings, the DUSI-R can be used for case identification, diagnosis in the ten areas, treatment monitoring for change, and follow-up assessment. Researchers can apply the DUSI-R to obtain quantification of severity in the ten domains and in studies of heterogeneity of subtypes, patient-treatment matching, epidemiological surveys, and needs assessments.
The DUSI-R is available in three formats: pencil-and-paper self-administered; interview; and computer-based self-administered. The self-administered versions require at least a fifth-grade reading level. The DUSI-R has 159 items and takes approximately 20-40 minutes to administer.

Availability
The DUSI-R is copyrighted. Cost for use is $5 each for paper or online questionnaires. The online version automates scoring and provides access to reports for monitoring client progress over time (software license $250/year). Purchase from eCenter Research <a href="http://www.yourhealthcheck.org/">http://www.yourhealthcheck.org/</a>.

Contact
Dr. Steve Weatherbee<br>
eCenter Research<br>
<a href="mailto:steve@ecenterresearch.com">steve@ecenterresearch.com</a><br>
866-480-2716 ext. 201

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder (of the original DUSI).
Original DUSI: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Drug Use Screening Inventory 110.pdf

SourceRef
Tarter R. Evaluation and treatment of adolescent substance abuse : A decision tree method. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 1990;16:1-46.

OtherRef
Conway KP; Levy J; Vanyukov M; Chandler R; Rutter J; Swan GE; Neale M. Measuring addiction propensity and severity: the need for a new instrument. [Review] Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010;111(1-2):4-12.
Kirisci L; Tarter R; Reynold M. The "Violence Proneness Scale" of the DUSI-R predicts adverse outcomes associated with substance abuse. American Journal on Addictions 2009;18(2):173-177.
Tarter RE; Kirisci L. Validity of the Drug Use Screening Inventory for predicting DSM-III-R substance use disorder. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 2001;10(4):45-53.
De Micheli D; Formigoni M. Screening of drug use in a teenage Brazilian sample using the Drug Use Screening Inventory (DUSI). Addictive Behaviors 2000;25(5):683-691.
Tarter R; Kirisci L. The Drug Use Screening Inventory for adults : psychometric structure and discriminative sensitivity. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 1997;23:207-219.
Kirisci L; Mezzich A; Tarter R. Norms and sensitivity of the adolescent version of the Drug Use Screening Inventory. Addictive Behaviors 1995;20:149-157.
Tarter R; Hegedus AM. The Drug Use Screening Inventory: Its applications in the evaluation and treatment of alcohol and other drug abuse. Alcohol Health & Research World 1991;15(1):65-75. [Contains a copy of the scale.]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DUSI%20/%20Drug+Use+Screening+Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug Use Screening Inventory-Revised (DUSI)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/32_DUSI-R.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href="http://www.dusi.com/">Official Drug Use Screening Inventory-Revised web site</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Drug+Use+Screening+Inventory%22”>PubMed search: Drug Use Screening Inventory</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
Chinet
TIP 31

InstrumentType
Screening
Assessment
Treatment planning
Outcome evaluation
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 31
NFATTC
NIDA SI

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1990

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
<p>
Scoring can be done manually by examiner (paper version), or fully automated in real time (online version). Norms are available (on adolescents) and the instrument has been normed on subgroups using two profiles: (1) absolute problem severity in 10 domains, and (2) relative problem severity in which each person's unique configuration is ranked. Overall problem density index is also obtained. Ranking severity of problems from 0 to 100 percent enables identifying and prioritizing intervention and resources.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the DUSI-R using test-retest, split half, and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”), and constructs.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan
Bukstein article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DUSI-R_inst




AccessNo
114

Name
Exercise Addiction Inventory

Acronym
EAI

Developer
Terry, Annabel
Szabo, Attila
Griffiths, Mark D.

Description
The Exercise Addiction Inventory is a short form inventory that was developed to quickly and easily identify people at risk from exercise addiction. The EAI Short Form consists of six items ranked on a scale of 1 to 5 (where 1 is "strongly disagree" and 5 is "strongly agree"). Items include "Exercise is the most important thing in my life" and "If I have to miss an exercise session, I feel moody and irritable." The instrument has been demonstrated to be psychometrically sound, with good internal reliability, content validity, concurrent validity, and construct validity. The scale has been found useful in a variety of settings, including as a self-assessment.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The instrument is printed in the source article.

Contact
Mark Griffiths<br>
International Gaming Research Unit, Psychology Division<br>
Nottingham Trent University<br>
Burton Street<br>
Nottingham NG1 4BU, United Kingdom<br>
<a href="mailto:mark.griffiths@ntu.ac.uk">mark.griffiths@ntu.ac.uk</a>

ADAI
Copy of instrument is in source article (ADAI jl).
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Exercise Addiction Inventory 114.pdf
[from source reference]

SourceRef
Terry A; Szabo A; Griffiths M. The Exercise Addiction Inventory: A new brief screening tool. Addiction Research and Theory 2004;12(5):489-499. [includes a copy of the instrument]

OtherRef
Griffiths MD; Szabo A; Terry A. The exercise addiction inventory: a quick and easy screening tool for health practitioners. Br J Sports Med 2005;39(6):e30.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20EAI%20/%20Exercise+Addiction+Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Exercise Addiction Inventory (EAI)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2004

AdminScoring
The EAI takes about a minute to complete and is easy to score. A score of 0-12 suggests an asymptomatic individual, 13-23 a symptomatic one, and 24 or greater, an individual at ris.

ValidRely
Reliability was found to have a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84, with good test-retest reliability at two weeks. The scale was also found to have strong concurrent validity with the Obligatory Exercise Questionnaire and the Exercise Dependence Scale. For more psychometric information, see Terry et al 2004 and Griffiths et al 2005.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/EAI_inst




AccessNo
115

Name
Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence

Acronym
FTND
FTN
FTQ
mFTQ
FTCD

Developer
Fagerstrom, Karl-Olov
Heatherton, Todd F.
Kozlowski, Lynn T.
Frecker, Richard C.

Description
The Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence was designed to provide an ordinal measure of nicotine dependence related to cigarette smoking. It contains six items that evaluate the quantity of cigarette consumption, the compulsion to use, and dependence. It is useful as a screen for nicotine dependence and as a severity rating that can be used for treatment planning and prognostic judgments. The brevity and easy scoring of the FTND make it an efficient way to obtain clinically meaningful information. It can also be incorporated into general health and lifestyle screening questionnaires in clinical and nonclinical settings. This instrument is a revision of the Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire (FTQ). It takes 2 minutes or less to administer the FTND and 2 minutes or less to score it.
The Modified Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire (mFTQ; Prokhorov et al., 1998) is an adapted version of a scale originally designed to assess behavioral indicators of physical dependence on nicotine among adult smokers (FTQ). It includes a modified set of adult symptoms for adolescents to address graded levels of smoking behavior, avoidance of the physiological effects of nicotine deprivation, and perceived difficulty refraining when prevented from smoking. It has been shown to predict continued smoking, quantity and frequencey of tobacco use, and shorter periods of abstinence from smoking over time.
The FTND is sometimes also called the FTCD -- Fagerstrom Test for Cigarette Dependence.

Availability
Copyright 1991, Taylor & Francis Ltd. The FTN is copyrighted but can be reproduced without permission and is available in the Source Reference (Heatherton et.al. 1991). A French translation is available, and administration by telephone has been reported (Pomerleau et.al. 1994). Chinese (Yamada H, 2009) and Italian version have also been studied.

Contact
Taylor & Francis Ltd.<br>
Main Headquarters<br>
11 New Fetter Lane<br>
London, Ec4P 4EE United Kingdom<br>
<a href="http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals">http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Fagerstrom_Test_for_Nicotine_Dependence_115.pdf

ADAI
Source reference.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Fagerstrom_Test_for_Nicotine_Dependence_115.pdf [formatted for SDS]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence 115.pdf [from source reference]

SourceRef
Heatherton TF; Kozlowski LT; Frecker RC; Fagerstrom KO. The Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence : a revision of the Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire. Br J Addict 1991;86(9):1119-1127.

OtherRef
Carpenter MJ; Baker NL; Gray KM; Upadhyaya HP. Assessment of nicotine dependence among adolescent and young adult smokers: a comparison of measures. Addictive Behaviors 2010;35(11):977-982.
Courvoisier DS; Etter J. Comparing the predictive validity of five cigarette dependence questionnaires. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010; 107(2-3):128-133.
Courvoisier D; Etter J. Using item response theory to study the convergent and discriminant validity of three questionnaires measuring cigarette dependence. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):391-401.
Rios-Bedoya CF, Snedecor SM, Pomerleau CS, Pomerleau OF. Association of withdrawal features with nicotine dependence as measured by the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Addict Behav 2008;33(8):1086-9.
Kleinjan M; van den Eijnden RJJM; van Leeuwe J; Otten R; Brug J; Engels RCME. Factorial and convergent validity of nicotine dependence measures in adolescents: Toward a multidimensional approach. Nicotine and Tobacco Research 2007;9(11):1109-1118.
Pomerleau CS, Carton SM, Lutzke ML, et.al. Reliability of the Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire and the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence. Addict Behav 1994;19(1):33-39.
Piper ME; McCarthy DE; Baker TB. Assessing tobacco dependence : a guide to measure evaluation and selection. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2006;8(3):339-351.
Prokhorov AV; Koehly LM; Pallonen UE; Hudmon KS. Adolescent nicotine dependence measured by the modified Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire at two time points. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 1998;7(4):35-47.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20FTND%20/%20%28Fagerstrom%20Test%20%26%20Nicotine%20Dependence%29%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND)</a>
<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Fagerstrom+Test+for+Nicotine+Dependence%22">PubMed Search: Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20418%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence - Smokeless Tobacco</a>

SourceInfo
Source reference
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
APA

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1991

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No training is required to administer and score the instrument.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
The FTND has good test–retest reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Internal consistency was better for the FTND than for the FTQ. Detailed psychometric information can be found in the Supporting References below.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Smokers
Adolescents
College students

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/FTND_inst




AccessNo
119

Name
Fast Alcohol Screening Test

Acronym
FAST

Developer
Hodgson, Ray J.
John, Bev
Abbasi, Tina
Hodgson, Rachel C.
Waller, Seta
Thom, Betsy
Newcombe, Robert G.

Description
The FAST is a 4-question screening instrument designed for use in busy medical centers, though it has been shown to be reliable in other settings as well. It was developed from the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). A significant feature is the ability of the first question to identify 50% of patients as either alcohol abusers or not. The total test takes approximately 12 seconds to administer and was consistently reliable when sensitivity and specificity were tested against AUDIT as the gold standard.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The FAST manual (which includes the FAST and scoring sheets) can be found at: <a href="http://alcoholresearchuk.org/downloads/finalReports/AERC_FinalReport_0005.pdf">http://alcoholresearchuk.org/downloads/finalReports/AERC_FinalReport_0005.pdf</a>.

Contact
Ray Hodgson<br>
<a href="mailto:ray@southerns.net>ray@southerns.net</a>

InstURL
http://alcoholresearchuk.org/downloads/finalReports/AERC_FinalReport_0005.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Fast Alcohol Screening Test 119.pdf
[manual and test, downloaded from AERC site]

SourceRef
Hodgson RJ; Alwyn T; John B; Thom B; Smith A. The Fast Alcohol Screening Test. Alcohol & Alcoholism 2002;37(1):61-66.

OtherRef
Meneses-Gaya C, Crippa JA, Zuardi AW, Loureiro SR, Hallak JE, Trzesniak C, Machado de Sousa JP, Chagas MH, Souza RM, Martín-Santos R. The Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) is as good as the AUDIT to screen alcohol use disorders.
Substance Use & Misuse 2010;45(10):1542-57.
Aalto M; Tuunanen M; Sillanaukee P; Seppa K. Effectiveness of structured questionnaires for screening heavy drinking in middle-aged women. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2006;30(11):1884-1888.
Hodgson RJ; John B; Abbasi T; et al. Fast screening for alcohol misuse. Addictive Behaviors 2003;28:1453-1463.
Linke S; Harrison R; Wallace P. A web-based intervention used in general practice for people with excessive alcohol consumption. J Telemed Telecare 2005; 11(Suppl 1):39-41.
Linke S; Brown A; Wallace P. Down your drink: A web-based intervention for people with excessive alcohol consumption. Alcohol Alcohol 2004;39(1):29-32.
Meneses-Gaya C; Zuardi AW; Loureiro SR; Hallak JEC; Trzesniak C; de Azevedo Marques JM; Machado-de-Sousa JP; Chagas MHN; Souza RM; Crippa JAS. Is the full version of the AUDIT really necessary? Study of the validity and internal construct of its abbreviated versions. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2010;34(8):1417-1424.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Fast+Screening+for+Alcohol+Misuse%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST)</a>

RelatedInst
AUDIT
CAGE

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2003

InstURLHost
Alcohol Education and Research Council (AERC)

AdminScoring
The FAST has high sensitivity and specificity even though it is very quick to administer, and therefore cheap. It is especially useful in clinics with a high prevalence of alcohol misusers, such as emergency rooms.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/FAST_inst




AccessNo
120

Name
Mother-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

Acronym
M-SMAST

Developer
Crews, Timothy M.
Sher, Kenneth J.

Description
This 13-question variations on the Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (SMAST) assess an individual's mother's lifetime alcohol abuse and can be used to identify children of alcoholics for both clinical and research purposes. The M-SMAST has strong psychometric properties. it is a pencil-and-paper self-administered questionnaire and takes under 10 minutes total to administer and score and interpret.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain.

Contact
Kenneth J. Sher, Ph.D<br>
Department of Psychological Sciences<br>
University of Missouri-Columbia<br>
200 South 7th St.<br>
Columbia, MO 65211

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Mother_Father_Short_Michigan_Alcoholism_Screening_Test_120_294.pdf

ADAI
A complete is available in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems" (HV 5279 N38 A8 2003 REF INST), p. 239-240.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Mother_Father_Short_Michigan_Alcoholism_Screening_Test_120_294.pdf [from NIAAA, both Mother and Father versions]

SourceRef
Crews TM ; Sher KJ. Using adapted short MASTs for assessing parental alcoholism: Reliability and validity. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 16, 576-584, 1992.

OtherRef
Cummings SF ; Griffin JA. Identifying offspring of problem-drinking parents: Comparison of five self-report measures. Substance Use & Misuse 1999; 34(13): 1817-1836.
Hodgins DC ; Shimp L. Identifying adult children of alcoholics - Methodological review and comparison of the CAST-6 with other methods. Addiction 1995; 90(2): 255-267.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20M+SMAST%20/%20Mother+Short+Michigan%20Alcoholism%20Screening%20Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Mother-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (M-SMAST)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/01_ASMAST.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20226%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20156%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20294%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Father-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

InstURLHost
ADAI (Mother- and Father- versions)

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring is done by hand. A SAS program is available to provide further scoring information. Norms are not available and the instrument has not been normed on subgroups.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done, using test-retest, split half, and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct. Both the F-SMAST and the M-SMAST have demonstrated high reliability and validity. Detailed psychometric information is available in the Source Reference above.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/M-SMAST_inst




AccessNo
121

Name
Five-Shot Questionnaire

Developer
Seppa, Kaija
Lepisto, Jaana
Sillanaukee, Pekka

Description
This 5-item, self-administered questionnaire was developed to recognize heavy alcohol drinking in its early phase. A combination of AUDIT and CAGE questions, Five-Shot only takes 1 minute to fill in. It has only been studied among male early-phase heavy drinkers in Finland and among men and women in Belgium.
In clinical settings, the Five-Shot is useful because it is short and easy to fill in. It is recommended especially for use by primary health care GPs and family physicians. More studies are needed to find out its validity and reliability especially among women and in different cultures. This instrument is not applicable for research purposes as a "gold standard."

Availability
This instrument is copyrighted. There is no charge for use. It is available in English, Belgian, and Finnish.

Contact
Kaija Seppa<br>
Medical School<br>
Department of General Practice<br>
FIN-33014 University of Tampere<br>
Finland<br>
tel: 358 50 3739818

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Five_Shot_Questionnaire_121.pdf

ADAI
A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems" (HV 5279 N38 A8 2003 REF INST), p. 413.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Five_Shot_Questionnaire_121.pdf [from NIAAA]
A complete copy of this instrument can be found in (De Rick, 2007). (See Other refs)

SourceRef
Seppa K, Lepisto J, Sillanaukee P. Five-Shot Questionnaire on heavy drinking. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1998;22(8):1788-1791

OtherRef
De Rick A, Vanheule S. Pilot study: Does the Five Shot Questionnaire give an indication of the severity of alcohol use-related problems? Subst Use Misuse 2007; 42(10):1593 - 1601.
Seppa K, Makela R, Sillanaukee P. Effectiveness of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test in occupational health screenings. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1995: 19(4):999-1003.
Meneses-Gaya C; Zuardi AW; Loureiro SR; Hallak JEC; Trzesniak C; de Azevedo Marques JM; Machado-de-Sousa JP; Chagas MHN; Souza RM; Crippa JAS. Is the full version of the AUDIT really necessary? Study of the validity and internal construct of its abbreviated versions. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2010;34(8):1417-1424.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Five+Shot+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Five-Shot Questionnaire</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/34_Five-Shot.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</A>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1998

InstURLHost
ADAI

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
The Five-Shot can be scored by a nurse or physician in about a minute. Norms are available and the instrument has also been normed on the following subgroups: moderate and heavy drinkers, and alcoholics.

ValidRely
Some validity and reliability studies have been done.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/Five-Shot_inst




AccessNo
150

Name
MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale

Acronym
MAC / MAC-R

Developer
MacAndrew, Craig

Description
The MAC is designed to screen for alcoholism using "covert content items," i.e., items which do not directly mention drinking. Instead, the scale items tap personality traits and attitudinal characteristics frequently associated with substance abuse, while not asking about alcohol (or drug use) itself. The scale is embedded in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), but it can also be administered separately. MAC scores do not change significantly with addiction treatment (Gallucci et al, 1989).<p>
A review by Craig (2005) concludes that the MAC/MAC-R does well in distriminating persons who abuse substances from non-clinical, non-abusing groups. However, it appears to lose diagnositic efficacy with psychiatric patients or medical patients with seizure disorders. The MAC could also be used in research on personality characteristics of alcoholics.
The MAC consists of 49 items in self-administered pencil-and-paper or computerized format. Administering the test takes approximately 10 minutes and can be done by a nonprofessional.
<p>NOTE re: MAC-R: When the MMPI was re-standardized, four of the original items in the MAC were eliminated due to objectionable religious content; they were replaced with four new items which differentiated persons who abused alcohol from nonalcohol-abusing men and women.

Availability
Copyright 1989 by the University of Minnesota Press. Copies of the <a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/mmpi_2.htm">MMPI-2</a> or the <a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/mmpia.htm">MMPI-A</a>, which include the MAC-R as a supplementary scale, can be purchased from Pearson Assessments.

Contact
Pearson Assessments<br>
tel: 800-627-7271 (assessment instruments sales number)
<a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/index.htm">http://www.pearsonassessments.com/index.htm</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale 150.pdf [from NIAAA book]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale 150 SDS.pdf [SDS formatted version -- SDS is not currently offering this scale]

SourceRef
MacAndrew C. The differentiation of male alcoholic outpatients from non-alcoholic psychiatric outpatients by means of the MMPI. Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol 26:238-246, 1965.

OtherRef
Craig RJ. Assessing contemporary substance aubsers with the MMPI MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale: A review. Substance Use & Misuse 2005; 40(4):427-450.
Cooper-Hakim A. A meta-analytic review of the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale. Educational & Psychological Measurement 2002;62(5):818-829.
Smith SR, Hilsenroth MJ. Discriminative validity of the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale with Cluster B personality disorders. J Clin Psychol 2001;57(6):801-13.
Gallucci NT ; Kay DC ; Thornby JI. The sensitivity of 11 substance abuse scales from the MMPI to change in clinical status. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 1989;3(1):29-33.
Gottesman LI ; Prescott CA. Abuses of the MacAndrew MMPI Alcoholism Scale : A critical review. Clinical Psychology Review 1989;9:223-242.
Preng KW ; Clopton JR. The MacAndrew Scale : Clinical application and theoretical issues. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 1986;47:1090-1095.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MacAndrew%20Alcoholism%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale (MAC)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/41_MAC.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22MacAndrew+Alcoholism+Scale%22”>PubMed search: MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1989

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by a nonprofessional in approximately 2-3 minutes. Norms are available and the instrument has been normed on subgroups of women and alcoholics with collateral drug problems.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the MAC using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”) and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan
CESAR - DUI

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MAC_inst




AccessNo
151

Name
Marijuana Screening Inventory

Acronym
MSI

Developer
Alexander, Dale

Description
The Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI) is a cannabis-specific screening instrument. It was developed as a psychometrically reliable and valid tool for clinical use in general mental health and primary care settings. This self-report inventory takes approximately ten minutes to complete and consists of 31 Yes/No questions, which are scored, and eight additional items, which are not included in the total score. The instrument is now considered in its final form, with reliability and validity established in multiple studies with over 600 subjects. The MSI has been confirmed as reliable and valid, with an empirically determined scoring cut-off, using receiver operator curve analyses studies to validate the scoring system. The MSI has been employed in multiple settings and found to have clinical utility as a quick screen for assessing if client(s) have a problematic relationship with cannabis use. The MSI has been used for research with a general population sample, and within substance abuse specialty, mental health outpatient, and primary care settings. It is undergoing evaluation for translation and use in European countries.

Availability
Copyright 2003 by the Haworth Press, Inc. A copy of the instrument, with scoring instructions, is printed in the source document (Alexander, 2003).

Contact
Dale Alexander PhD, Associate Professor<br>
Graduate School of Social Work, University of Houston<br>
Houston, TX, 77204-4013<br>
<a href="mailto:dalexander@uh.edu">dalexander@uh.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Marijuana Screening Inventory 151.pdf [from source reference]

SourceRef
Alexander D. Clinical Pilot Experiences Using the Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI-X): Screening Guidelines and Case Illustrations. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 2003;3(4), 29-51. [includes a copy of the scale]

OtherRef
Alexander D. A marijuana screening inventory (experimental version): Description and preliminary psychometric properties. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2003;29(3):619-646.
Alexander DE ; Leung P. The Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI-X): Reliability, factor structure, and scoring criteria with a clinical sample. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2004;30(2):321-351.
Alexander DE ; Leung P. The Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI-X): Concurrent, convergent and discriminant validity with multiple measures. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2006;32(3):351-378
Alexander D; Leung P. The Marijuana Screening Inventory (Experimental Version): Reliability Factor Structure, and Scoring Criterion with a Clinical Sample. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 2004;30(4):321-351.
Alexander, D. Marijuana Assessment Dilemmas: Time for Marijuana Specific Screening Methods? Social Work Practice in Addictions 2003; 3(4): 5-28.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MSI%20/%20Marijuana+Screening+Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Marijuana Screening Inventory (MSI)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference & author corrections sent 6/7/08

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB, NS

EntryDate
200501

Year
2003

Notes
References and Valid/Rely field updated in Jan 2008 after an email from Dale Alexander (developer).

ValidRely
Research on the psychometrics of this cannabis screen has established the reliability, factor structure, discriminant, convergent and concurrent validities, with multiple samples, as well as empirical cut offs, sensitivity, specificity via ROC analysis, and concurrent validities. For details, see Alexander & Leung, 2006, and Alexander and Leung, 2004 in Supporting References below.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MSI_inst




AccessNo
152

Name
Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics
Marin Short Scale

Acronym
SASH

Developer
Marin, Gerardo
Sabogal, Fabio
Marin, Barbara V.

Description
This 12 item, 5 minute scale was developed to compensate for limitations of other acculturation measures by measuring acculturation specifically among Hispanic populations. It is a self-administered, self-report measure with five key variables: generation, length of residence, self-evaluation, acculturative index, and age of arrival. The SASH and the Marin Short Scale are the same instrument.

Availability
This scale is not copyrighted and can be used freely.

InstURL
http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/MARIN%20Short%20Scale.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Marin Short Scale 152.pdf [downloaded from CASAA site]

SourceRef
Marin G; Sabogal F; Marin BV. Development of a short acculturation scale for Hispanics. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 1987;9(2):183-205.

SourceInfo
George Warren Brown School of Social Work

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1987

InstURLHost
CASAA

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/Marin-Short-Scale_inst




AccessNo
156

Name
Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test

Acronym
MAST

Developer
Selzer, Melvin L.

Description
The MAST is one of the most widely used measures for assessing alcohol abuse. The measure is a 25-item questionnaire designed to provide a rapid and effective screening for lifetime alcohol-related problems and alcoholism. It is also useful in assessing the extent of lifetime alcohol-related consequences. Although not intended to be a complete measure of alcohol-related problems, the MAST provides a gross, general measure of lifetime problem severity that can be used for choosing treatment intensity and guiding further inquiry into alcohol-related problems. The MAST, which can be used in either a paper-and-pencil self-administered or interview format, has been productively used in a variety of settings, both research and clinical, with varied populations.
<p> The MAST can be administered in approximately 8 minutes and scored in 5 minutes.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain. There is no fee for use. Also available are briefer versions of the MAST, including the 10-item Brief MAST (Pokorny et al., Am J Psychiatry, 1972;129:342-345), the 13-item Short MAST (SMAST), and a 9-item modified version called the Malmo modification (Mm-MAST) (Kristenson & Trell, Brit J Addict 1982;77:297-304).

Contact
Melvin L. Selzer, M.D.<br>
6967 Paseo Laredo<br>
LaJolla, CA 92037<br>
<a href="mailto:jmslzr@aol.com">jmslzr@aol.com</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Michigan_Alcoholism_Screening_Test_156.pdf

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Michigan_Alcoholism_Screening_Test_156.pdf [formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Selzer ML. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test: The quest for a new diagnostic instrument. Am J Psychiatry 1971;127:1653-1658. [contains a copy of the instrument and scoring instructions]

OtherRef
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
Shields AL, Howell RT, Potter JS, Weiss RD. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test and its shortened form: a meta-analytic inquiry into score reliability. Subst Use Misuse 2007;42(11):1783-800.
Cavaiola AA, Strohmetz DB, Wolf JM, Lavender NJ. Comparison of DWI offenders with non-DWI individuals on the MMPI-2 and the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test. Addict Behav 2003;28(5):971-7.
Easton CJ ; Swan S ; Sinha R. Prevalence of family violence in clients entering substance abuse treatment. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2000;18(1):23-28.
Lapham SC; Skipper BJ; Simpson GL. A prospective study of the utility of standardized instruments in predicting recidivism among first DWI offenders. J Stud Alcohol 1997; 58(5):524-30.
Maisto SA ; Connors GJ ; Allen JP. Contrasting self-report screens for alcohol problems : A review. Alcoholism : Clinical and Experimental Research 1995;19(6):1510-1516.
Zung BJ. Psychometric properties of the MAST and two briefer versions. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 1979;40(9):845-859.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Michigan%20Alcoholism%20Screening%20Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/42_MAST.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Michigan+Alcoholism+Screening+Test%22”>PubMed search: Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20226%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (SMAST)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20294%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Father-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (F-SMAST)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20120%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Mother-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (M-SMAST)</a>
Brief Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (Brief MAST)
Malmo-modification Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (Mm-MAST)

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 16
TIP 42
METRIC

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1971

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Detailed psychometric information can be found in the APA book.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by staff in approximately 5 minutes. Scoring instructions can be found in the source article (along with a copy of the scale).

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the MAST using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content and criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
DUI/DWI drivers

MatrixRecd
Dennis/Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MAST_inst




AccessNo
159

Name
Michigan Assessment Screening Test for Alcohol and Drugs

Acronym
MAST/AD

Developer
Westermeyer, Joseph
Yargic, Ilhan
Thuras, Paul

Description
The MAST/AD is a modification of the Michigan Alcohol Screening Test designed to include problems associated with other drug abuse/dependence besides alcohol. It consists of 24 questions, each taken directly from the MAST but edited to include a reference to drug use as well. For example, "Do you enjoy a drink now and then?" was changed to "Do you enjoy a drink or drug use now and then?" Answers are assigned a number of points, which are then tallied up at the end and compared to a scale. The lifetime MAST/AD demonstrates reliability as a severity measure for alcohol and/or drug abuse.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found in Appendix I of the source reference.

Contact
Dr. Joseph Westermeyer, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.<br>
Department of Psychiatry, VAMC<br>
1 Veterans Dr.<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55417<br>
<a href="mailto:weste010@umn.edu">weste010@umn.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Michigan Assessment Screening Test for Alcohol and Drugs 159.pdf [from source reference]

SourceRef
Westermeyer J; Yargic I; Thuras P. Michigan Assessment-Screening Test for Alcohol and Drugs (MAST/AD): Evaluation in a clinical sample. American Journal on Addictions 2004;13:151-162. [includes a copy of the scale]

OtherRef
Westermeyer J, Canive J, Thuras P, et al. A comparison of substance use disorder severity and course in American Indian males and female veterans. Am J Addict 2009;18(1):87-92.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MAST+AD%20/%20Michigan+Assessment+Screening+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Michigan Assessment Screening Test for Alcohol and Drugs (MAST/AD)</a>
Jones HE, Kaltenbach K. Treating Women with Substance Use Disorders During Pregnancy: A Comprehensive Approach to Caring for Mother and Child. Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 57.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20156%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20226%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20294%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Father-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%202120%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Mother-Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2004

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MAST-AD_inst




AccessNo
161

Name
Mini-Mental State Examination

Acronym
MMSE

Developer
Folstein, Marshal F.
Folstein, Susan E.
McHugh, P.R.

Description
The MMSE is a brief, easily administered, quantitative measure of cognitive status in adults. It can be used to screen for cognitive impairment (such as Alzheimer's disease), to estimate the severity of cognitive impairment at a given point in time, to follow the course of cognitive changes in an individual over time, and to document an individual's response to treatment. The MMSE has demonstrated validity and reliability in psychiatric, neurologic, geriatric, and other medical populations. It is a fully structured scale that consists of 30 points grouped into 7 categories: orientation to place and to time, registration, attention and concentration, recall language, and visual construction. It is scored in terms of the number of correctly completed items. The test takes about 5-10 minutes to administer.
The test has been used as the primary cognitive screening instrument in several large-scale epidemiolgical studies of dementia. It is also widely used in clinical practice and is often reported in research studies as a benchmark of the severity of dementia that can be used to compare patient cohorts across studies.
The MMSE is insensitive to mild cognitive impairment, lacks diagnostic specificity, and may not be sensitive to education, literacy, or visual problems.
The 3MS (Modified Mini- Mental State Exam) tests for both dementia and cognitive impairment. It is a 27-item questionnaire (19 MMSE plus 8 additional) that tests orientation to time and place, attention, concentration, long- and short-term memory, language, and abstract thinking. It takes 5-15 minutes to complete, is well-validated and is used in a variety of settings (Teng, 1987).

Availability
The copyright for the MMSE is wholly owned by Mini Mental LLC. Published by Psychological Assessment Resources (PAR), Inc. Cost for a Standard Version Kit (user manual, forms, pocket norms guide) is $155 (2013). Order online at <a href="http://www4.parinc.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=MMSE-2#Items">http://www4.parinc.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=MMSE-2#Items</a>.

Contact
Mini-Mental State Examination web site<br>
<a href="http://www.minimental.com/">http://www.minimental.com/</a>

ADAI
The MMSE is included on the CD-ROM that accompanies the APA Handbook.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Mini Mental State Examination 161.pdf [formatted for CTN use]

SourceRef
Folstein MF; Folstein SE; McHugh PR. Mini-Mental State: A practical method for grading the state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research 1975;12:189-198.

OtherRef
Burns RA, Butterworth P, Kiely KM, Bielak AA, Luszcz MA, Mitchell P, Christensen H, Von Sanden C, Anstey KJ. Multiple imputation was an efficient method for harmonizing the Mini-Mental State Examination with missing item-level data. J Clin Epidemiol 2011;64(7):787-93.
Smith KL; Horton NJ; Saitz R; Samet JH. The use of the mini-mental state examination in recruitment for substance abuse research studies. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2006;82(3):231-237.
Crum RM; Anthony JC; Bassett SS; Folstein MF. Population-based norms for the mini-mental state examination by age and educational level. JAMA 1993;18:2386-2391.
Cockrell JR; Folstein MF. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Psychopharmacology 1988;24:689-692.
Teng, E.L. & Chui, H.C. (1987). A Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) Examination. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 48: 314-318.
Anthony JC; LeResche L; Niaz U; et al. Limits of the mini-mental state as a screening test for dementia and delirium among hospital patients. Psychological Medicine 1982;12:397-408.

Resources
<a href="http://www.minimental.com/">MiniMental.com</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MMSE%20/%20Mini+Mental+State+Examination%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Mini+Mental+State+Examination%22”>PubMed search: Mini-Mental State Examination</a>

RelatedInst
Telephone-Assessed Mental State (TAMS)
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20405%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS)</a>
Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MS)

SourceInfo
MiniMental.com
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Psychological assessment

Recommended
APA

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503, 201105

Year
1975

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS
CTN Copy retrieved from CTN Livelink Jan 2010
WSIPP discussed this measure as one which may assist a clinician in the investigation process for involuntary treatment.
http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/11-01-3402.pdf

AdminScoring
The test is desinged to be easily administered by any health care professional or trained technician who has received minimal instruction in its use. It takes 5-15 minutes to complete.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

Status
public

Population
Adults

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MMSE_inst




AccessNo
163

Name
Munich Alcoholism Test

Acronym
MALT

Developer
Feuerlein, W.
Ringer, C.
Kofner, H.
Antons, K.

Description
The MALT is an alcoholism screening test that aims to identify alcoholics in an unselected population of patients. The test consists of two parts: a self-rating questionnaire (24 items) and a physician rate part (7 items). In clinical settings, the MALT can be used in the early (motivation or "contact") phase of management/help to identify alcoholics and to motivate them to undergo treatment. In terms of research applicability, the MALT can be used for identification of alcoholics (confirmation of the diagnosis) in clinical studies. It should be administered by a medical doctor.

Availability
Copyrighted by Prof. Dr. med. Wilh. Feuerlein.

Contact
Prof. Dr. med. Wilh. Feuerlein<br>
Max-Plank-Institut fur Psychiatrie<br>
Kraepellnstr. 10<br>
D 80804<br>
Munchen

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Munich Alcoholism Test 163.pdf

SourceRef
Feuerlein W; Ringer C; Kofner H; Antons K. Diagnosis of alcoholism. The Munich Alcoholism test (MALT). (Author's transl) Mtlnchn Med Wschr 1977;119:1275-1282.

OtherRef
Agelink MW, Ullrich H, Lemmer W, Dirkes-Kersting A, Zeit T. Screening for concomitant alcohol abuse in schizophrenia: clinical significance of the Munich Alcoholism Test and laboratory tests. Eur Addict Res 1999 Jun;5(2):82-7.
Gorenc KD, Bruner CA, Nadelsticher A, Pacurucu S, Feuerlein W. A cross-cultural study: a comparison of German, Spanish and Ecuadorian alcoholics using the Munich Alcoholism Test (MALT). Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 1984;10(3):429-46.
Skinner HA; Holt S; Allen BA; Haakonson NH. Correlation between medical and behavioral data in the assessment of alcoholism. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1980;4(4):371-7.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Munich+Alcoholism+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Munich Alcoholism Test (MALT)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (1995 edition; not included in newer edition)

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1977

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by medical assistant or doctor in about 2-3 minutes. Norms are available, and the instrument has also been normed on subgroups of alcoholics and nonalcoholic patients.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest, split half, and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content and criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MALT_inst




AccessNo
166

Name
NET

Developer
Bottoms, Sidney F.
Martier, Susan S.
Sokol, Robert J.

Description
The NET is a 3-item measure for detecting excessive alcohol consumption among women of reproductive age. It is composed of one MAST item, one CAGE item, and one T-ACE item. The questions are: Do you consider yourself a normal drinker? (Normal; from the MAST); Do you ever have an "eyeopener"? (Eyeopener; from the CAGE); and How many drinks to get you high? (Tolerance; from the T-ACE). The tolerance question is scored positive for =>3 drinks. The NET has been used predominantly with women of reproductive age. In both clinical and research settings, it is a useful instrument for efficient screening of excessive drinking.

Availability
Copyright 1989 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Contact
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins<br>
Permissions Department<br>
351 West Camden St.<br>
Baltimore, MD 21201<br>
tel: 410-528-4050<br>
<a href="mailto:permissions@lww.com">permissions@lww.com</a><br>
<a href="http://www.lww.com/permissions/index.htm">http://www.lww.com/permissions/index.htm</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/insnet.htm

ADAI
Three items are in the description field, or can be found at NIAAA: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/insnet.htm.

SourceRef
Bottoms SF; Martier SS; Sokol RJ. Refinements in screening for risk drinking in reproductive-aged women: The "NET" results (abstract). Alcoholism Clin Exp Res 1989;13:339

OtherRef
Russell M; Martier SS; Sokol RJ; et al. Screening for pregnancy risk-drinking. Alcoholism Clin Exp Res 1994;18(5):1156-61.
Burns E; Gray R; Smith LA. Brief screening questionnaires to identify problem drinking during pregnancy: a systematic review. Addiction 2010; 105(4):601-614.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20NET%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: NET</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/net.htm">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 16

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1989

InstURLHost
NIAAA

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by staff in approximately 1 minute. No norms are available.

ValidRely
Validity studies have been done on this instrument, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/NET_inst




AccessNo
167

Name
Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale

Acronym
OCDS

Developer
Anton, Raymond F.
Moak, Darlene H.
Latham, Patricia

Description
The OCDS is a 14-item, self-administered questionnaire for characterizing and quantifying the obsessive and compulsive cognitive aspects of craving and heavy (alcoholic) drinking, such as drinking-related thought, urges to drink, and the ability to resist those thoughts and urges. It has sensitivity as a monitoring tool and has predictive validity for relapse drinking. Preliminary data also indicate that the OCDS may be a useful screening instrument for the presence of alcohol abuse and dependence, and may be used to differentiate between individuals who are alcohol dependent and those who do not drink excessively.<p>
One potential advantage of the OCDS over the CAGE and MAST questionnaires is that the OCDS is not dependent upon environment-dependent consequences of drinking. It is useful in monitoring individuals in treatment, and increasing scores may predict relapse drinking.
<p>Researchers may find the OCDS useful because it is easily modifiable to study the obsessive and compulsive characteristics of other addictive disorders, and may be useful as a screening instrument for these disorders. This instrument may also be used to characterize further the similarities between alcohol abuse/ dependency and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It has been used as an outcome measure in treatment trials. In several controlled treatment trials is has differentiated naltrexone from placebo response.

Availability
Copyright 1995 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. The OCDS is available in English, Dutch/Flemish, French, German, Israel/Hebrew, Japanese, Spanish, and Swedish. An adolescent version is also available, the A-OCDS. A copy of the OCDS is also available on the NIAAA web site: <a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/scale1.doc">http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/scale1.doc</a>.

Contact
Raymond F. Anton, MD<br>
Medical University of South Carolina<br>
<a href="mailto:antonr@musc.edu">antonr@musc.edu</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/scale1.doc

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale 167.pdf

SourceRef
Anton RF, Moak DH, Latham P. The Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale: A self-rated instrument for the quantification of thoughts about alcohol and drinking behavior. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1995;19(1):92-99.

OtherRef
Connor JP, Feeney GFX, Jack A, Young RMcD. The Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale is a valid measure of alcohol craving in young adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2010;34(12):2155-2161.
Cordero M; Solis L; Cordero R; Torruco M; Cruz-Fuentes C. Factor structure and concurrent validity of the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale in a group of alcohol-dependent subjects of Mexico City. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2009;33(7):1145-1150.
Nakovics H, Diehl A, Croissant B, Mann K. Modifications of the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS-G) for use in longitudinal studies. Addict Behav 2008 Oct;33(10):1276-81.
Connor JP, Jack A, Feeney GF, Young RM. Validity of the obsessive compulsive drinking scale in a heavy drinking population. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2008;32(6):1067-73.
Roberts JS; Anton RF; Latham PK; Moak DH. Factor structure and predictive validity of the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1999 Sep; 23(9): 1484-91.
Anton RF; Drobes DJ. Clinical measurement of craving in addiction. Psychiatric Annals 1998;28:553-560.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20OCDS%20/%20Obsessive%20Compulsive%20Drinking%20Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS)</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Obsessive+Compulsive+Drinking+Scale%22”>PubMed search: Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2012%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Adolescent Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20168%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale - Revised</a>
<a href="http://bit.ly/OCCUS_inst">Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Use Scale (OCCUS)</a>
<a href="http://bit.ly/OCCS_inst">Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Scale (OCCS)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Assessment
Outcome evaluation
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
APA
TIP 28

EnteredBy
MB, NS

EntryDate
200503

Year
1995

InstURLHost
NIAAA

Notes
Detailed psychometrics can be found in the APA book.
APA book says it's in the public domain
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
The OCDS takes approximately 5 minutes to complete and can be scored using simple addition in under 1 minute. Norms are available, and this instrument has been normed on subgroups (NIAAA does not elaborate).

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the OCDS using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content and criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Dennis/Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/OCDS_inst




AccessNo
172

Name
Perceived Benefit of Drinking Scale

Acronym
PBDS

Developer
Petchers, Marcia
Singer, Mark

Description
The PBDS is designed to assess reasons for drinking and drug use and to screen adolescents for a more comprehensive substance use assessment. It assesses frequency, situational use, consequences of use, perceived benefits of use, peer and parental use. The PBDS uses five true/false statements written with nonthreatening wording (i.e. "Drinking helps me feel good about myself") and can be administered in about 10 minutes (by a qualified counselor knowledgeable about substance abuse).

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted. There is no cost for use.

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/PDF/Perceived_Benefit_of_Drinking_Scale_172.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/PDF/Perceived_Benefit_of_Drinking_Scale_172.pdf

SourceRef
Petchers M ; Singer M. Perceived benefit of drinking scale: Approach to screening for adolescent alcohol use. J Pediatrics 1987;110:977-981.

OtherRef
Petchers M ; Singer M. Clinical applicability of a substance abuse screening instrument. J Adolesc Chem Depend 1990;1:47-53.
Werner MJ ; Walker LS ; Greene JW. Longitudinal evaluation of a screening measure for problem drinking among female college freshmen. Arch Pediatric Adolesc Med 1994;148(12):1331-1337.
Werner MJ ; Walker LS ; Greene JW. Screening for problem drinking among college freshmen. J Adolesc Health 1994;15(4):303-310.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20PBDS%20/%20Perceived+Benefit+of+Drinking+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Perceived Benefit of Drinking Scale (PBDS)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (1995 edition; not included in later editions)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Assessment
Screening

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1987

InstURLHost
ADAI

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring by the researcher/counselor takes about 10 minutes. Norms are available, and the instrument has also been normed on the following subgroups: urban, rural, black, white, male, and female.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive"), and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PBDS_inst




AccessNo
176

Name
Personal Experience Inventory

Acronym
PEI

Developer
Winters, Ken C.
Henly, George A.

Description
This self-report inventory documents the onset, nature, degree, and duration of chemical involvement in 12- to 18-year-olds. It identifies personal risk factors that may precipitate or sustain substance abuse. In addition, five problem screens alert you to the possibility of family chemical dependency, sexual abuse, physical abuse, eating disorder, suicide potential, and need for psychiatric referral.
Because the PEI simplifies identification, referral, and treatment, it is widely used in substance abuse treatment programs, student assistance programs, juvenile rehabilitation centers, and private practice. The PEI makes it easier to evaluate the many adolescents who are entering the health care system at younger ages with more poorly defined problems. It permits more specialized treatment, and it helps document the need for treatment. In research settings, the PEI is useful in any study assessing adolescent chemical dependency and psychosocial risk.
The 56-item PEI takes approximately 45-60 minutes to administer and can be scored by computer.

Availability
Copyright 1988 by the Saint Paul Foundation. Cost is $135 per test kit (including manual and cost of computer scoring and interpretation for five administrations).

Contact
Ken Winters, Ph.D.<br>
University of Minnesota<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
420 Delaware St. SE, Box 393<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55455 <p>
For computerized scoring version, contact:<br>
Western Psychological Services<br>
12031 Wilshire Boulevard<br>
Los Angeles, CA 90025-1251<br>
tel: 310-478-2061<br>
<a href="http://www.wpspublish.com">http://www.wpspublish.com</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/pei.pdf

ADAI
Sample questions: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Personal Experience Inventory SAMPLE QUESTIONS 176.pdf

SourceRef
Winters DC ; Henly GA. Personal Experience Inventory (PEI) Test and Manual. Lost Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services, 1989.

OtherRef
Botzet AM ; Winters KC ; Stinchfield R. Gender differences in measuring adolescent drug abuse and related psychosocial factors. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 2006;16(1):91-108.
Dahmus S ; Bernardin HJ ; Bernardin K. Personal Experience Inventory. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development 1992;25(2):91-94.
Stinchfield R ; Winters KC. Predicting adolescent drug abuse treatment outcome with the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI). J Child Adolesc Subst Abuse 2003;13(2):103-120.
Winters KC ; Latimer WW ; Stinchfield RD ; Henly GA. Examining psychosocial correlates of drug involvement among drug clinic-referred youth. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 1999;9:1-18.
Winters KC ; Stinchfield RD ; Henly GA. Further validation of new scales measuring adolescent alcohol and other drug abuse. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 1993;54(5):534-541.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20PEI%20/%20Personal%20Experience%20Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Personal Experience Inventory (PEI)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/48_PEI.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Personal+Experience+Inventory%22”>PubMed search: Personal Experience Inventory</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20177%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Personal Experience Inventory for Adults</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
Chinet
TIP 31

InstrumentType
Assessment
Screening
Treatment planning
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 31
NFATTC
NIDA SI

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1988

InstURLHost
NIAAA (sample questions)

Notes
Selected as an evidence based adolescent screening instrument in: Dembo, Richard. Introduction. Subst Use & Misuse 2005;40(7):879-885.

AdminScoring
This instrument should be administered by a trained clerk. Only minimal training is required.
The PEI is scored by computer disk or mail-in (or fax) answer sheet. Norms are available and the instrument has also been normed on subgroups of drug clinic samples and normal high school samples.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the PEI using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”), and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PEI_inst




AccessNo
177

Name
Personal Experience Inventory for Adults

Acronym
PEI-A

Developer
Winters, Ken C.

Description
This self-report inventory documents substance use and resulting problems in adults. The instrument is composed of two parts -- Problem Severity Section (120 items) and Psychosocial Section (150 items). Validity indicators are also included to help determine whether the client is responding accurately and honestly. The score report provides normative data of scale score results, the findings from 10 Problem Screens, treatment guidelines, and a detailed narrative.
In clinical settings, the PEI-A can aid in case identification and treatment referral. In terms of research applicability, the PEI-A provides a standard description of a sample and can be modified for use in treatment outcome.
The PEI-A is available in pencil-and-paper or computerized self-administered formats and takes approximately 45 minutes to administer.

Availability
This instrument is copyrighted and must be purchased. Order online from <a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,103214&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL">Western Psychological Services</a>.

Contact
Western Psychological Services<br>
12031 Wilshire Boulevard<br>
Los Angeles, CA 90025-1251<br>
tel: 310-478-2061<br>
<a href="http://www.wpspublish.com">http://www.wpspublish.com</a>

ADAI
A sample of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems" (HV 5279 N38 A8 2003 REF INST), p. 517-518.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Personal Experience Inventory for Adults 177.pdf [from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Winters KC. Personal Experience Inventory -- Adults Manual. Los Angeles, CA : Western Psychological Services, 1996.

OtherRef
Winters KC. A new multiscale measure of adult substance abuse. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 1999;16:237-246.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20PEI%20/%20Personal%20Experience%20Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Personal Experience Inventory (PEI)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/49_PEI-A.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20176%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Personal Experience Inventory</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Assessment
Outcome evaluation
Treatment planning
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1996

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring is done by computer in about 2 minutes. Norms are available and the instrument has also been normed on subgroups of treatment-seeking and normal communities.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the PEI-A using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”), and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PEI-A_inst




AccessNo
178

Name
Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire

Acronym
PESQ

Developer
Winters, Ken C.

Description
This instrument provides a quick, cost-effective way to screen 12- to 18-year-olds for substance abuse. In just 10 minutes, this brief self-report questionnaire identifies teenagers who should be referred for a complete chemical dependency evaluation.
In clinical settings, the PESQ helps service providers make appropriate referrals. It is especially useful in schools, juvenile detention facilities, medical clinics, and other settings where routine screening rather than in-depth assessment is the goal. For researchers, the PESQ is useful in screening subjects, as an initial step in identifying those with chemical dependency problems.
The PESQ contains 40 yes-no and multiple-choice Likert items, organized in 3 subscales (Problem Severity, Psychosocial Items, and Drug Use History), and is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered format (written at a 4th grade reading level). It takes approximately 10 minutes to administer.

Availability
This instrument is copyrighted (1991) and must be purchased. Order online from <a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,69732&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL">Western Psychological Services</a>.

Contact
Ken Winters, Ph.D.<br>
University of Minnesota<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
420 Delaware Street SE<br>
PO Box 393<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55455

ADAI
Sample questions: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire SAMPLE QUESTIONS 178.pdf
[from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Winters K. Manual for the Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ). Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services, 1991.
Winters KC. Development of an adolescent alcohol and other drug abuse screening scale: Personal Experiences Screening Questionnaire. Addict Behav 1992;17:479-490.

OtherRef
Sheilds AL; Campfield DC; Miller CS; et al. Score reliability of adolescent alcohol screening measures: A meta-analytic inquiry. J Child Adolesc Subst Abuse 2008;17(4):75-9
Winters KC ; Remafedi G ; Chan B. Assessing drug abuse among gay-bisexual young men. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 1996;10:228-236.
George MS ; Skinner HA. Assessment. IN: Annis HM ; Davis CS (eds.). DRUG USE BY ADOLESCENTS : IDENTIFICATION, ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION. Toronto, Canada : Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Foundation, 1991, pp. 85-108.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20PESQ%20/%20Personal%20Experience%20Screening+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/50_PESQ.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Personal+Experience+Screening+Questionnaire%22”>PubMed search: Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20463%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Indian Health Service-Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (IHS-PESQ)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

Recommended
NIAAA
APA
NFATTC
TIP 31

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1991

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
The PESQ can be scored automatically as it is administered, using the AutoScore Form (as the examinee circles responses directly on the form, the answers are transferred to the scoring sheets on the inside pages of the form, which the examinee cannot access). Norms are provided in the manual for a school sample, a school clinic sample, a drug clinic sample, and a juvenile correctional institution sample.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the PESQ using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion (predictive, concurrent, “postdictive”), and construct. Detailed psychometric information is available in the APA book.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Bukstein article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PESQ_inst




AccessNo
181

Name
Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale - Self-Report

Acronym
PDS

Developer
Foa, Edna B.

Description
The Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS) is a 49-item self-report instrument designed to aid in the detection and diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The structure and content of the PDS assessment mirror the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for PTSD. The PDS was developed specifically to fill the need for a brief self-report instrument that would help provide a reliable diagnosis of PTSD and for quantifying the severity of PTSD symptoms. The test takes 10-15 minutes to complete and is written at the 8th-grade reading level.

Availability
This instrument is copyrighted by Pearson Assessments and cannot be copied without permission in writing. A manual that describes the development, psychometric properties, and use of the PDS is available (Foa, 1995).

Contact
Pearson Assessments<br>
tel: 800-627-7271, ext. 3225<br>
<a href="mailto:pearsonassessments@pearson.com">pearsonassessments@pearson.com</a><br>
<a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com">http://www.pearsonassessments.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale Self Report 181.pdf [formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Foa E, Cashman L, Jaycox L, Perry K. The validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9:445-451, 1997.
Foa EB. PDS (Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale) Manual. Minneapolis: National Computer Systems, 1995.

OtherRef
Foa EB, Davidson JRT, Frances A. (eds). The Expert Consensus Guidelines Series: Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 1999; 60, Supplement 16.
Sheeran T, Zimmerman M. Screening for posttraumatic stress disorder in a general psychiatric outpatient setting. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology 2002; 70(4): 961–966.
Powell S, Rosner R. The Bosnian version of the international self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder, the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, is reliable and valid in a variety of different adult samples affected by war. BMC Psychiatry 2005;5:11.

Resources
<a href="http://www.pearsonassessments.com/tests/pds.htm">Pearson Assessments PDS site</a>
<a href="http://www.ptsd.va.gov/">The National Center for PTSD</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Posttraumatic+Stress+Diagnostic+Scale%22”>PubMed search: Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale</a>

SourceInfo
National Center for PTSD
Pearson Assessments
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Psychological assessment

Recommended
APA

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1995

Notes
Edna B. Foa, PhD, is a professor at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University and director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
Most commonly administered in the form of a paper and pencil questionnaire, but can also be administered online using software from Pearson Assessments (formerly National Computer Systems, Inc.)

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
The PTDS has demonstrated high internal consistency and test–retest reliability, high diagnostic agreement with SCID, and good sensitivity and specificity. The satisfactory validity of the PTDS was further supported by its high correlations with other measures of trauma-related psychopathology. Detailed psychometric information can be found in the Foa et al, 1997 reference.

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PDS_inst




AccessNo
188

Name
Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers

Acronym
POSIT

Developer
Rahdert, Elizabeth H.
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Description
The POSIT, available in English and Spanish language versions, is a screening tool, using a yes/no response format, designed to identify problems that require further in-depth assessment and the potential need for service in 10 functional areas, including substance use/abuse, mental and physical health, family and peer relations, vocation, and special education. The POSIT is a self-administered 139-item screening questionnaire, written at a 5th grade reading level, that takes 20-30 minutes to complete.<p>
A computerized administration and scoring version of the POSIT has been developed by PowerTrain, Inc., Landover, MD. This application not only reduces administration and scoring time, but it also automatically prepares a convenient, summary bar graph that compares individual scores with normative cut-points. This summary may be printed out and used to initiate a discussion between the adolescent and provider.

Availability
The POSIT is not copyrighted and is available free-of-charge. The only request is that Elizabeth Rahdert, Editor, National Institute on Drug Abuse, is acknowledged in written materials. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact
For general inquiries, contact the author:<br>
Elizabeth Rahdert, Ph.D.<br>
Division of Clinical and Services Research<br>
National Institute on Drug Abuse<br>
National Institutes of Health Room 4229<br>
6001 Executive Boulevard<br>
Bethesda, MD 20892-9563 <br>
tel: 301-443-0107<br>
<a href="mailto:Elizabeth_Rahdert@nih.gov">Elizabeth_Rahdert@nih.gov</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Problem_Oriented_Screening_Instrument_for_Teenagers_188.pdf

ADAI
Source reference: RJ 503.7 A31 1991 [REF INST]
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Problem_Oriented_Screening_Instrument_for_Teenagers_188.pdf

SourceRef
Rahdert EH. (ed.). Adolescent Assessment Referral System Manual. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1991.

OtherRef
Sheilds AL; Campfield DC; Miller CS; et al. Score reliability of adolescent alcohol screening measures: A meta-analytic inquiry. J Child Adolesc Subst Abuse 2008;17(4):75-97.
Knight JR, Sherritt L, Harris SK, Gates EC, Chang G. Validity of brief alcohol screening tests among adolescents: a comparison ofthe AUDIT, POSIT, CAGE, and CRAFFT. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2003 Jan;27(1):67-73.
Knight JR, Goodman E, Pulerwitz T, DuRant RH. Reliability of the Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) in adolescent medical practice. J Adolesc Health. 2001 Aug;29(2):125-30.
Latimer WW, Winters KC, Stinchfield RD. Screening for drug abuse among adolescents in clinical and correctional settings using the Problem-Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 1997 Feb;23(1):79-98.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20POSIT%20/%20Problem%20Oriented%20Screening%20Instrument%20For%20Teenagers%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT)</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Problem+Oriented+Screening+Instrument+for+Teenagers%22”>PubMed search: Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20409%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Parents (POSIP)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (no longer included)
Source reference
Chinet
TIP 31

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
TIP 31
NFATTC
EIB
NIDA SI

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1991

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
POSIT is part of the Adolescent Assessment/Referral System (AARS)
Selected as an evidence based adolescent screening instrument in: Dembo, Richard. Introduction. Subst Use & Misuse 2005;40(7):879-885.

AdminScoring
Two scoring systems are available, the original system presented in the Adolescent Assessment-Referral System (AARS) manual and the newer scoring system available from NIDA. The original scoring system includes "red flag" items and one expert-based cut-off score that indicates either a high or low risk for each of the 10 problem areas. In contrast, the newer scoring system does not consider red flag items but includes two empirically based cut-off scores that indicate low, medium, or high risk for each of the 10 problem areas. In the newer system, the total raw score for each problem determines the level of risk for that area. <p>

It takes about two seconds for computerized scoring and 2-5 minutes when using the scoring templates that are placed over the paper and pencil versions of the POSIT and POSIT follow-up questionnaires. No special qualifications are necessary to administer POSIT and POSIT follow-up questionnaires as their formats are very clear and straightforward.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Studies have determined that the POSIT presents strong internal consistency reliability in several of its subscales. It has also demonstrated good test-retest reliability and overall validity. However, further refinement of the scale is needed to improve its internal consistency. That said, clinicians can be assured that the POSIT is a generally reliable tool for screening adolescent medical patients.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Bukstein article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/POSIT_inst




AccessNo
197

Name
RAFFT

Developer
Bastiaens, Leo
Francis, Gerard
Lewis, Karen

Description
The RAFFT is a five-question instrument developed for screening adolescent substance use disorders (SUD). In a recent study, the RAFFT performed well in adolescents with SUD, in an acute psychiatric setting, with sensitivity and specificity of 89% and 69% with two positive answers. The questions of the RAFFT (relax, alone, friends, family, trouble), appear to tap into common themes related to adolescent substance use, such as peer pressure, self-esteem, anxiety, and exposure to friends and family members who are using drugs or alcohol. Similar dynamics may still be present in adult substance users, although their use of drugs and alcohol may become independent from these psychosocial variables. Because of the ease of administration and the good performance in adolescents, the RAFFT may turn out to be a useful instrument in screening adult patients for SUD.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found in the source reference (table 1).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\RAAFT 197.pdf
[from source reference]

SourceRef
Bastiaens L ; Francis G ; Lewis K. The RAFFT as a screening tool for adolescent substance use disorders. Am J Addict 2000; 9:10-16. [includes copy of scale]

OtherRef
Bastiaens L ; Riccardi K ; Sakhrani D. The RAFFT as a screening tool for adult substance use disorders. Am J Drug Alc Abuse 2002 Nov;28(4):681-691. [includes the questions from the instrument]
Riggs SR ; Alario A. RAFFT Questions. Project ADEPT Manual; Brown University, 1987.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RAFFT%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: RAFFT</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20346%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CRAFFT</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2000

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RAFFT_inst




AccessNo
201

Name
Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen
Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen - Quantity Frequency

Acronym
RAPS4
RAPS4-QF

Developer
Cherpitel, Cheryl

Description
The RAPS4 is a four-item instrument that provides high sensitivity and specificity across gender and ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic) for alcohol dependence during the last year in clinical populations. A positive response to any one of the items signifies positive for alcohol dependence based on ICD-10 and/or DSM-IV criteria for the 12 months. A positive on the first item in particular (feeling guilt or remorse) identifies over 80% of those meeting criteria for alcohol dependence. This instrument is useful in both clinical and research settings.<p>
The RAPS4 is available in interview format and takes approximately 1 minute for clinical staff to administer.<p>
A second version of the RAPS4, the RAPS4-QF, has also been developed. It adds two items to the original scale, measuring quantity (During the last year, have you had five or more drinks on at least one occasion?) and frequency (During the last year, did you drink as often as once a month?).

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted. It is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact
Cheryl Cherpitel, Ph.D.<br>
Public Health Institute<br>
Alcohol Research Group<br>
2000 Hearst Ave., Suite 300<br>
Berkeley, CA 94709-2167<br>
tel: 510-642-0164

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Rapid_Alcohol_Problems_Screen_201.pdf

ADAI
A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's "Assessing Alcohol Problems" (HV 5279 N38 A8 2003 REF INST), p. 538.
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Rapid_Alcohol_Problems_Screen_201.pdf [from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Cherpitel CJ. Screening for alcohol problems in the emergency room: A rapid alcohol problems screen. Drug Alcohol Depend 1995;40:133-7

OtherRef
Geneste J, Pereira B, Arnaud B, et al. CAGE, RAPS4, RAPS4-QF and AUDIT screening tests for men and women admitted for acute alcohol intoxication to an emergency department: Are standard thresholds appropriate? Alcohol Alcoholism 2012;47(3):273-281
Nayak MB; Bond JC; Cherpitel C; Patel V; Greenfield TK. Detecting alcohol-related problems in developing countries: a comparison of 2 screening measures in India. Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 2009; 33(12):2057-2066.
Cherpitel CJ, Ye Y, Bond J, et al. Cross-national performance of the RAPS4/RAPS4-QF for tolerance and heavy drinking: Data from 13 countries. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2005;66(3):428-432.
Borges A, Cherpitel CJ. Selection of screening items for alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the emergency department. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2001;62:277-285.
Cherpitel CJ. A brief screening instrument for problem drinking in the emergency room : The RAPS 4. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2000;61:447-449.
Cherpitel CJ. Screening for alcohol problems in the emergency room : A rapid alcohol problems screen. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 1995;40:133-137.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RAPS%20/%20RAPS4%20/%20Rapid+Alcohol+Problems+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/54_RAPS4.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1995

InstURLHost
ADAI

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring is immediate -- positive response on any one of the four items is positive for alcohol dependence.

ValidRely
No reliability studies have been done on the RAPS4. Validity studies have been done using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

AltURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Rapid_Alcohol_Problems_Screen_QF_201.pdf

AltURLHost
ADAI

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RAPS4_inst




AccessNo
210

Name
Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index

Acronym
RAPI

Developer
White, Helene R.

Description
The RAPI is a 18-item (originally 23-item) self-administered screening tool for assessing adolescent problem drinking. It was developed in order to create a conceptually sound, unidimensional, relatively brief, and easily administered instrument to assess problem drinking in adolescence. The advantages of this screening tool lie in its ease of administration and its standardization, which make it possible to compare problem drinking scores across groups.
In clinical settings, the RAPI can be used to assess the extent of alcohol-related problems and to indicate negative consequences of use. Researchers can use the RAPI as a continuous variable which indicates the frequency of experiencing negative consequences due to alcohol use. It can also be used to compare problem drinking scores across individuals and groups.
The RAPI is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered and interview formats and takes approximately 10 minutes to administer.
A short-form version of the RAPI was developed in 2008 after a study that involved the analysis of over 2000 college student RAPI scores determined that 7 of the RAPI's 23 items functioned differentially for men and women. These items were dropped from the Short Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (S-RAPI), creating a shorter scale with less potential for sex bias and potentially greater usability for both participants and researchers. See Earleywine et al, 2008 in Other References below for more on the S-RAPI.

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted. There is no cost for use. (The developers request that persons who use RAPI send them their age/sex norms as well as a description of their sample.)

Contact
Helene R. White<br>
Center of Alcohol Studies<br>
Rutgers University<br>
607 Allison Rd. <br>
Piscataway, NJ 08855-0969<br>
<a href="mailto:hewhite@rci.rutgers.edu">hewhite@rci.rutgers.edu</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Rutgers_Alcohol_Problem_Index_210.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index 210.pdf [NIAAA, 23-item version]
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Rutgers_Alcohol_Problem_Index_210.pdf [formatted for SDS, 18-item version]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Short Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index 210.pdf [shows the 23 item RAPI with the 7 items removed for the S-RAPI in boldface type]

SourceRef
White HR ; Labouvie EW. Towards the assessment of adolescent problem drinking. J Stud Alcohol 50:30-37, 1989.

OtherRef
Collins S ; Carey K ; Sliwinski M. Mailed personalized normative feedback as a brief intervention for at-risk college drinkers. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2002;63:559-567.
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
Ginzler JA; Garrett SB; Baer JS; Peterson PL. Measurement of negative consequences of substance use in street youth: an expanded use of the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(7):1519-1525.
Larimer ME ; Turner AP ; Anderson BK ; Fader JS ; Kilmer JR ; Palmer RS ; Cronce JM. Evaluating a brief alcohol intervention with fraternities. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2001;62:370-380.
Marlatt GA ; Baer JS ; Kivlahan DR ; Dimeff LA ; Larimer ME ; Quigley LA ; Somers JM ; Williams E. Screening and brief intervention for high-risk college student drinkers : Results from a 2-year follow-up assessment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 1998;66:604-615.
Miller ET ; Neal DJ ; Roberts LJ ; Baer JS ; Cressler SO ; Metrik J ; Marlatt GA. Test-retest reliability of alcohol measures: Is there a difference between internet-based assessment and traditional methods. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2002;16:56-63.
Earleywine M ; LaBrie JW ; Pedersen ER. A brief Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index with less potential for bias. Addictive Behaviors 2008;33(9):1249-1253.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RAPI%20/%20Rutgers+Alcohol+Problem+Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/57_RAPI.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 31

EnteredBy
MB,PM

EntryDate
200501
200705

Year
1989

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument. It is very easy to administer and can be self-administered or administered by an interviewer. It could also be adapted for use with a computer, although the authors have not made a computer version.
Scoring can be done by anyone and takes only 5 minutes -- you simply add the numbers from each response to form a total score. Norms are available and the instrument has been normed on subgroups of an adolescent community sample and an adolescent inpatient (alcohol and drug problems) sample.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest, split half, and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive") and construct. Factor analysis has also been done.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
College students

MatrixRecd
Dennis

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RAPI_inst




AccessNo
215

Name
Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test

Acronym
SAAST

Developer
Swenson, Wendell M.
Morse, Robert M.

Description
The SAAST is a 35-item alcoholism screening test derived from the MAST. Items have been added to the MAST to make it suitable for use in general medical populations. The test is available in two forms: Form I is suitable for administration to the patient ("Do you have a drink now and then?"), and Form II is for use with a person (spouse, friend, etc.) who knows the patient ("Does the patient have a drink now and then?"). Domains included are loss of control, occupational and social disruption, physical consequences, emotional consequences, concern on the part of others, and family members with alcohol problems. The SAAST is frequently used as a screening instrument for alcoholism in general medical inpatient and outpatient settings. It could also be used in research, most likely as a criterion measure in target samples.
The SAAST is available in pencil-and-paper and computerized self-administered formats. It takes less than 5 minutes to administer.

Availability
Copyright 1975, Mayo Foundation. There is no cost for use.

Contact
Terry Schneekloth, M.D.<br>
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology<br>
Mayo Clinic<br>
200 First St., SW<br>
Rochester, MN 55905

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test Form I 215.pdf [formatted for SDS, Form I]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test Form II 215.pdf [formatted for SDS, Form I]

SourceRef
Swenson WM ; Morse RM. The use of a self-administered alcoholism screening test (SAAST) in a medical center. Mayo Clin Proc 1975;50:204-208.

OtherRef
Allen LM ; Nelson CJ ; Rouhbakhsh P ; Scifres SL ; Greene RL ; Kordinak ST ; Kavis LJ Jr ; Morse RM. Gender differences in factor structure of the Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test. Journal of Clinical Psychology 1998;54(4):439-445.
Allen JP ; Litten RZ. Psychometric and laboratory measures to assist in the treatment of alcoholism. Clinical Psychology Review 1993;13(3):223-239.
Ammar KA; Samee S; Colligan R; Morse R; Faheem O; Shapiro M; Kors J; Rodeheffer RJ. Is self-reported "moderate" drinking in the cardiovascular benefit range associated with alcoholic behavior? A population based study. Journal of Addictive Diseases 2009; 28(3):243-249.
Davis LJ Jr ; Morse RM. Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test: A comparison of conventional versus computer-administered formats. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1991;15(2):155-157,
Davis LJ ; Hurt R ; Morse RM ; Obrien P. Discriminant analysis of the Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1987;11(3):269-273.
Hurt RD, Morse RM, Swenson WM. Diagnosis of alcoholism with a self-administered alcoholism screening test: results with 1,002 consecutive patients receiving general examinations. Mayo Clin Proc. 1980 Jun;55(6):365-70.
Pristach CA ; Smith CM ; Perkins C. Reliability of the Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test (SAAST) in psychiatric patients. Journal of Addictive Diseases 1993;12(4):77-88.
Vickers-Douglas KS ; Patten CA ; Decker PA ; Offord KP ; Colligan RC ; Islam-Zwart KA ; Wolter TD ; Croghan IT ; Hall-Flavin D ; Hurt RD. Revision of the Self- Administered Alcoholism Screening Test (SAAST-R): a pilot study. Substance Use & Misuse 2005;40(6):789-812.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SAAST%20/%20Self-administered%20Alcohol*%20screening%20Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test (SASST)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/58_SAAST.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20330%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test - Revised</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 16

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1975

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by hand or computer in under 5 minutes. Norms are available, and the instrument has also been normed on subgroups of sex and age.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SAAST_inst




AccessNo
225

Name
Short Inventory of Problems - Alcohol and Drugs
10-Item SIP-AD

Acronym
SIP-AD

Developer
Blanchard, Kimberly A.
Morgenstern, Jon
Morgan, Thomas J.
Labouvie, Erich W.
Bux, Donald A.

Description
The Short Inventory of Problems - Alcohol and Drugs (SIP-AD), is a 15-item test that measures physical, social, intrapersonal, impulsive, and interpersonal consequences of alcohol and drug consumption. Respondents indicate whether each item occurred in the previous 30 days (or, in other versions of the scale, whether they have ever happened in the respondent's lifetime). Items include statements like, "I have been unhappy because of my drinking/drug use," "Because of my drinking/drug use, I have not eaten properly," "I have taken foolish risks when I have been drinking/using drugs," and "My drinking/drug use has damaged my social life, popularity, or reputation." Responses are summed across the 15 items to yield a total score.<p>

The SIP-AD is a shortened version of the Inventory of Drug Use Consequences (InDUC) -- itself a modified form of the Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DrInC). The original version, called the Short Inventory of Problems (SIP), focused only only alcohol and drinking. The original SIP can be found in the manual for the DrInC (see Miller et al, 1995 source reference).
The 10-item SIP-AD indicates a high degree of reliability and validity. Findings suggest the SIP-AD can be shortened to 10 items and appears to be a non-biased reliable and valid measure among non-treatment seeking MSM.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable; however, the DrInC is not copyright protected. A number of versions of the SIP are available on the CASAA web site (the "2L" version here uses the same items as the original SIP -- for the SIP-AD, change the term "drinking" to "drinking/drug use"):
<a href="http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/Short%20Inventory%20of%20Problems.pdf"> SIP-2L</a>, <a href="http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/Short%20Inventory%20of%20Problems%20FU.pdf">SIP Follow-Up</a>, <a href="http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/Short%20Inventory%20of%20Problems%20Profile.pdf">SIP Profile Sheet</a>, and <a href="http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/Short%20Inventory%20of%20Problems%20Scoring.pdf">SIP Scoring Sheet</a>. The source reference also contains a list of the original SIP-AD items in Table 1.

Contact
Kimberly A. Blanchard<br>
National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, Columbia University<br>
633 Third Ave., 19th Floor<br>
New York, NY 10017<br>
<a href="mailto:kblancha@casacolumbia.org">kblancha@casacolumbia.org</a>

InstURL
http://casaa.unm.edu/inst/Short%20Inventory%20of%20Problems.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Short_Inventory_of_Problems_225.pdf
[formatted for SDS, has 17 items]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Short Inventory of Problems 225.pdf
[CASAA, has 15 items -- to change this version into the SIP-AD, just change "drinking" to "drinking/drug use"]

SourceRef
Blanchard K; Morgenstern J; Morgan TJ; Labouvie EW; Bux DA. Assessing consequences of substance use: Psychometric properties of the Inventory of Drug Use Consequences. Psychol Addict Behav 2003;17(4):328-331 [though the article title says it is about the InDUC, it is also about the development of the SIP-AD]
Miller WR, Tonigan JS, & Longabaugh R. (1995). The Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DrInC): An instrument for assessing adverse consequences of alcohol abuse. Test manual (Project MATCH Monograph Series, Vol. 4). Rockville, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. [original SIP]
Hagman BT; Kuerbis AN; Morgenstern J; Bux DA; Parsons JT; Heidinger BE. An Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis of the Short Inventory of Problems - Alcohol and Drugs (SIP-AD) among non-treatment seeking men-who-have-sex-with-men: evidence for a shortened 10-item SIP-AD. Addictive Behaviors 2009;34(11):948-954.

OtherRef
Gillespie W, Holy JL, Blackwell RL. Measuring outcomes of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use among college students: A preliminary test of the Shortened Inventory of Problems - Alcohol and Drugs (SIP-AD). J Drug Issues 2007;37(3):549-567.
Feinn R, Tennen H, Kranzler HR. Psychometric properties of the short index of problems as a measure of recent alcohol-related problems. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2003;27(9):1436-41.
Kenna GA ; Longabaugh R ; Gogineni A ; Woolard RH ; Nirenberg TD ; Becker B ; Minugh PA ; Carty K : Clifford PR ; Karolczuk K. Can the Short Index of Problems (SIP) be improved? Validity and reliability of the three-month SIP in an emergency department sample. J Stud Alcohol 2005;66(3):433-437.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DrInC%20/%20Drinker+Inventory+of+Consequences%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DrInC)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2098%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Drinker Inventory of Consequences</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20143%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Inventory of Drug Use Consequences</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20634%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Modified SIP: SIP-SUD and SIP-BD</a>

SourceInfo
Smith, 2004 reference; source reference & Gillespie et al 2007.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB, ns

EntryDate
200501
200710

Year
2003

InstURLHost
CASAA (SIP-2L)

Notes
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

ValidRely
This instrument has shown strong intraclass correlations and excellent test-retest reliability, and has been found to be internally consistent and reliable.

Status
public

Population
Adults
College students

MatrixRecd
Dennis

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SIP-AD_inst




AccessNo
242

Name
Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory

Acronym
SASSI

Developer
Miller, Glenn A.

Description
The SASSI is a brief self-report, easily administered psychological screening measure that is available in separate versions for adults and adolescents. The Adult SASSI-3 helps identify individuals who have a high probability of having a substance dependence disorder with an overall empirically tested accuracy of 93%. The Adolescent SASSI-A2 is designed to identify individuals who have a high probability of having a substance use disorder, including both substance abuse and substance dependence, with its decision rules yielding an overall accuracy of 94%. The SASSI includes both face valid and subtle items that have no apparent relationship to substance use. The subtle items are included to identify some individuals with alcohol and other drug problems who are unwilling or unable to acknowledge substance misuse or symptoms associated with it.
In clinical settings, interpretations of the SASSI profiles suggest possibilities that the clinician may find useful in understanding clients and providing effective feedback. Examples of clinical inferences that may be drawn on the basis of certain scale scores include indication of defensive responding, clients' level of insight and awareness of the effects of their substance misuse, evidence of emotional pain, and relative risk of involvement with the legal/judicial system. In combination with other available assessment information, the clinical inferences suggested by examining SASSI profiles provide ideas for further evaluation and treatment considerations. Additionally, the SASSI's brevity, ease of administration and scoring, and availability of computer format for data storage and analysis make the instrument highly useful for research applications.
This instrument is especially helpful in inpatient and outpatient settings, including criminal justice, employee assistance, educational, mental health, medical, and vocational. The SASSI for adults consists of 93 items; for adolescents, 100. Each test is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered, computer self-administered and optical scanning version, or via web-based administration. It takes approximately 10-15 minutes to administer and can be administered by support staff.
The SASSI-3 (Miller, 1999) has been established in a variety of settings and populations, such as differentiating between substance-abusing and non-substance-abusing behaviors in adolescent and adult offenders. It has also shown utility as an effective substance abuse screen for use with college students. The SASSI-3 contains a Correctional (COR) scale that may provide counselors with the ability to identify college students who have a history of illegal behaviors and are at risk to repeat these behaviors, in order to provide prevention interventions. The COR scale's 15 items are intended to be used by counselors as they weigh treatment recommendations. A high score on the COR scale might indicate a risk of ciminality.

Availability
Copyright May 1988, 1994, 1997 by Glenn Miller. Some items are taken from the Psychological Screening Inventory, copyright 1968 by Richard I. Lanyon, Ph.D. Support materials for the SASSI available for purchase include user's guides, scoring, interpretation, and manuals providing comprehensive information on development, reliability, and validity.

Contact
The SASSI Institute<br>
tel: 800-726-0526<br>
<a href="http://www.sassi.com">http://www.sassi.com</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/sassi.pdf

ADAI
Sample questions: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory SAMPLE QUESTIONS 242.pdf [from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Miller GA. The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI): Manual, Second Edition. Springfield, IN : The SASSI Institute, 1985, 1999.
Miller FG; Lazowski LE. The adult SASSI-3 manual. Springville, IN: SASSI Institute, 1999.

OtherRef
Laux JM, Piazza NJ, Salyers K, Roseman CP. The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 and stages of change: A screening validity study. J Addict Offender Counseling 2012;33(2):82-92.
Perez DM, Wish ED. Gender differences in the validity of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 (SASSI-3) with a criminal justice population. Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol 2011;55(3):476-91.
Miller CS, Woodson J, Howell RT, Shields AL. Assessing the reliability of scores produced by the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory. Subst Use Misuse 2009;44(8):1090-100
Burck AM; Laux JM; Ritchie M; Baker D. An examination of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 Correctional Scale in a college student population. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling 2008;29(1):49-61.
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
Feldstein SW, Miller WR. Does subtle screening for substance abuse work? A review of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI). Addiction 2007;102(1):41-50.
Clements R. Psychometric properties of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3. J Subst Abuse Treat 2002;23(4):419-23.
Piazza NJ ; Martin N ; Dildine RJ. Screening instruments for alcohol and other drug problems. Journal of Mental Health Counseling 2000;22(3):218-227.
Lazowski LE ; Miller FG ; Boye MW ; Miller GA. Efficacy of the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory-3 (SASSI-3) in identifying substance dependence disorders in clinical settings. Journal of Personality Assessment 1998;71(1):114-128.
Horrigan TJ ; Piazza NJ ; Weinstein L. The Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) is more cost effective and has better selectivity than urine toxicology for the detection of substance abuse in pregnancy. Journal of Perinatology 1996;16(5):326-330.

Resources
<A href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SASSI*%20/%20Substance%20Abuse%20Subtle%20Screening%20Inventory*%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/66_SASSI.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Substance+Abuse+Subtle+Screening+Inventory%22”>PubMed search: Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA
NFATTC

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200501

Year
1988

InstURLHost
NIAAA (sample questions only; not full scale)

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring the SASSI takes approximately 5-10 minutes. A computerized scoring program is available.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Offenders
Adults
Adolescents
College students
Pregnant women

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SASSI_inst




AccessNo
248

Name
T-ACE

Developer
Sokol, Robert J.
Martier, Susan S.
Ager, Joel W.

Description
The T-ACE is a four-item questionnaire developed to for use with pregnant women; it provides obstetricians and gynecologists with a brief and useful way to identify patients at risk for drinking amounts which may be dangerous to the fetus. Positive results indicate exploration of the subject's drinking. In research, it can be used in conjunction with laboratory results and/or heavy drinking, or to estimate prevalence of pregnant women at risk. It can be administered by anyone, including non-professionals, in under 1 minute.

Availability
Copyright 1989 by Harcourt Health Sciences. The four T-ACE items, along with scoring instructions, can be found on the NIAAA web site: <a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh28-2/78-79.htm">http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh28-2/78-79.htm</a>.

Contact
Permissions Department, Mosby, Inc. (a division of Elsevier)<br>
6277 Sea Harbor Dr.<br>
Orlando, FL <br>
tel: 407-345-3994<br>
<a href="http://www.us.elsevierhealth.com/">http://www.us.elsevierhealth.com/</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh28-2/78-79.htm

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\T-ACE 248.pdf
[from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Sokol RJ ; Martier SS ; Ager JW. The T-ACE questions: practical prenatal detection of risk-drinking. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1989; 160(4):863-870.

OtherRef
Sarkar M, Einarson T, Koren G. Comparing the effectiveness of TWEAK and T-ACE in determining problem drinkers in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol 2010;116(4):827-33
Elliot DL ; Hickam DH. Use of the T-ACE questions to detect risk-drinking source. Am J Obstet Gyn 1990;163(2):684.
Pietrantoni M ; Knuppel RA. Alcohol use in pregnancy. Clinics Perinat 1991;18(1):93-111.
Russell M ; Czarnecki DM ; Cowan R ; McPherson E ; Mudar PJ. Measures of maternal alcohol use as predictors of development in early childhood. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1991;15(6):991-1000.
Kemper KJ. Self-administered questionnaire for structured psychosocial screening. Pediatrics 1992;89(3):433-436.
Bradley K. Interpreting Cage scores. Ann Int Med 1992;116(12):1032.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20T+ACE%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: T-ACE</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/t_ace.htm">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
source reference
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening

Recommended
NIAAA
TIP 16

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1989

InstURLHost
NIAAA

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
The administrator can score the T-ACE in about 5 minutes. Norms are available, and this instrument has also been normed on black inner-city women attending antenatal clinics.

ValidRely
Validity studies have been done on this instrument, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive"). Sensitivity=69%, specificity=89%, positive predictive value=23%, efficiency=88% (efficiency: overall percent correct).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Pregnant women
Women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/T-ACE_inst




AccessNo
252

Name
TWEAK

Acronym
TWEAK

Developer
Russell, Marcia

Description
TWEAK is a five-item scale developed originally to screen for risk drinking during pregnancy (however, the items are not gender specific and the scale can be used with either women or men). It is an acronym for the questions below: <p>
<blockquote><b>T</b> = Tolerance: "How many drinks can you hold?" (or, "How many drinks does it take to make you feel high?") <br>
<b>W</b> = Worried: "Have close friends or relatives Worried or Complained about your drinking in the past year?"<br>
<b>E</b> = Eye-openers: "Do you sometimes take a drink in the morning when you first get up?"<br>
<b>A</b> = Amnesia (blackouts); "Has a friend or family member ever told you about things you said or did while you were drinking that you could not remember?"<br>
<b>K(C)</b> = Cut Down: "Do you sometimes feel the need to cut down on your drinking?"
</blockquote>
In clinical settings, the TWEAK has been used to screen for periconceptional risk drinking among obstetric outpatients (Russell, et al, 1994, 1996). TWEAK has also been used to screen for harmful drinking and a DSM-III-R diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence in samples of the general household population, outpatient samples, and hospital inpatients (Chan, et al, 1993) and in emergency room settings (see el-Guebaly, Armstrong, & Hodgins, 1998, for a review). It provides a quick and easy method of targeting outpatients and inpatients in need of more thorough assessments of their drinking patterns and alcohol-related problems to determine whether treatment for alcoholism is needed. Information on alcohol use may also be important in planning treatment for patients' other health needs. Feedback on harm revealed by the assessment has the potential to motivate patients to reduce their alcohol intake, either on their own or by accepting treatment (Miller, Sovereign & Krege, 1998).
In terms of research, it would be appropriate to conduct further work on the psychometric properties of the instrument and its sensitivity and specificity with respect to various alcohol outcomes (risk drinking during pregnancy, harmful drinking, and alcohol abuse or dependence) in a wide range of populations, particularly those seen in community agencies with the capability to conduct follow-up assessments of individuals who score positively on the TWEAK, to conduct brief motivational counseling, and/or to refer individuals judged appropriate for alcohol treatment (Institute of Medicine, 1990). Eventually, the funding of research projects with long-term follow-up to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with such a program would be appropriate.
The TWEAK takes less than 2 minutes to administer and 1 minute to score. It is available in pencil-and-paper or computerized self-administered, or in interview formats.

Availability
This instrument is not copyrighted. There is no cost for use.

Contact
Marcia Russell<br>
Prevention Research Center<br>
1995 University Ave., Suite 450<br>
Berkeley, CA 94704<br>
tel: 510-883-5703<br>
<a href="mailto:russell@prev.org">russell@prev.org</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/TWEAK_252.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\TWEAK 252.pdf
[NIAAA version]
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/TWEAK_252.pdf
[formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Russell M ; Czarnecki DM ; Cowan R ; et al. Measures of maternal alcohol use as predictors of development in early childhood. Alcohol: Clinical and Experimental Research 1991;15:991-1000.
Russell M. New assessment tools for drinking in pregnancy : T-ACE, TWEAK, and others. Alcohol Health and Research World 1994;18(1):55-61.

OtherRef
Jones LA. Systematic review of alcohol screening tools for use in the emergency department. Emerg Med J 2011;28(3):182-91.
Burns E, Gray R, Smith LA. Brief screening questionnaires to identify problem drinking during pregnancy: A systematic review. Addiction 2010;105(4):601-14.
Sarkar M, Einarson T, Koren G. Comparing the effectiveness of TWEAK and T-ACE in determining problem drinkers in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol 2010;116(4):827-33
Flynn HA ; Cain SA ; O'Mahen HA ; Davis MM. Detection of maternal alcohol use problems in the pediatric emergency department. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2006;30(7):1160-1164.
Bush KR, Kivlahan DR, Davis TM, Dobie DJ, Sporleder JL, Epler AJ, Bradley KA. The TWEAK is weak for alcohol screening among female Veterans Affairs outpatients. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2003;27(12):1971-8.
Cherpitel CJ ; Borges G. Screening instruments for alcohol problems : A comparison of cut points between Mexican American and Mexican patients in the emergency room. J Stud Alcohol 2001;62(3):277-285.
Chang G ; Wilkins-Haug L ; Berman S ; Goetz MA. The TWEAK: Application in a prenatal setting. J Stud Alcohol 1999;60(3):306-309.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20TWEAK%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: TWEAK</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/InstrumentPDFs/74_TWEAK.pdf">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>
<a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22TWEAK%22”>PubMed search: TWEAK</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
APA
TIP 16

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1994

InstURLHost
ADAI

Notes
Detailed psychometric information can be found in the APA book.
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration or scoring of this instrument.
Scoring can be done by a health care worker in about 1 minute. Norms are available, and the instrument has been normed on the following subgroups: black gravidas seen in an inner-city clinic in Detroit; male and female general population samples; male and female alcoholic inpatients, and male and female outpatients from the primary health and family care centers of a county medical center in Western New York State; male and female, Black, White, and Hispanic emergency room outpatients.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

ValidRely
Validity studies have been done on the TWEAK, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults
Pregnant women
Women
Veterans

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TWEAK_inst




AccessNo
253

Name
Treatment Readiness Tool

Acronym
TReaT

Developer
Freyer, Jennis
Tonigan, J. Scott
Keller, S.
John, Ulrich
Rumpf, Hans-Jurgen
Hapke, Ulfert

Description
The Treatment Readiness Tool (TReaT) is a short self-report measure for alcohol treatment readiness, a construct correlated with but distinct from general change readiness. The 23-item questionnaire was based on the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) and the Readiness to Change Questionnaire (RCQ). This measurement of treatment seeking might have advantages in predicting treatment compliance, processes, and outcome relative to measures of general behavior change readiness. The predictive validity of the measure needs to be investigated in future studies.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A listing of the scale's 23 items can be found in Table 3 of the source reference.

Contact
Jennis Freyer<br>
Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine<br>
Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University of Greifswald<br>
Walther-Rathenau-Strasse 48<br>
17487 Greifswald, Germany<br>
<a href="mailto:freyer@uni-greifswald.de">freyer@uni-greifswald.de</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Treatment Readiness Tool 253.pdf [copy of table containing scale items, from source reference]

SourceRef
Freyer J ; Tonigan JS ; Keller S ; John U ; Rumpf H ; Hapke U. Readiness to change versus readiness to seek help for alcohol problems: The development of the Treatment Readiness Tool (TReaT). J Stud Alcohol 2004; 65(6):801-809.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Treatment+Readiness+Tool%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Treatment Readiness Tool (TReaT)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
2004

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TReaT_inst




AccessNo
255

Name
Triage Assessment for Addictive Disorders

Acronym
TAAD

Developer
Hoffmann, Norman G.

Description
The TAAD is a very brief, structured interview covering current alcohol and drug problems related to the DSM-IV criteria for abuse and dependence. As a triage interview it provides more definitive findings than a screen. The TAAD identifies obvious cases and provides substantial support for the diagnosis. In cases where a diagnosis is not indicated, the TAAD provides documentation of negative responses to some of the more prevalent abuse and dependence symptoms. For the remaining cases, where only a few problems are indicated, a comprehensive assessment will be required to make a definitive determination. <p>
The TAAD is intended for use in situations where a basic face-to-face screen or triage for a current diagnosis is desired with a minimum time commitment. It is ideal as a follow-up to a positive breath or urinalysis or when there is a need to assess probability of a current diagnosis. The TAAD can be used by a technician in medical settings or by correctional officers in jails or similar settings to determine when a clinician with expertise in chemical dependency should be consulted.

Availability
The TAAD has been copyrighted by Norman G. Hoffmann, Ph.D. and may not be adapted or photocopied. It can be ordered from <a href="http://www.evinceassessment.com/product_taad.html">The Change Companies/Evince Clinical Assessments</a>. The TAAD is also available by site license arrangement for large volume users (the site license provides a substantial discount).

Contact
The Change Companies<br>
5221 Sigstrom Dr.<br>
Carson City, NV 89706<br>
tel: 888-889-8866<br>
<a href="mailto:info@changecompanies.net">info@changecompanies.net</a><br>
<a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">http://www.changecompanies.net</a>

SourceRef
Hoffmann NG. TAAD: Triage Assessment for Addictive Disorders. Smithfield , RI : Evince Clinical Assessments, 1995.

OtherRef
Proctor SL, Hoffmann NG. A brief alternative for identifying alcohol use disorders. Substance Use & Misuse 2012;47(7):847-60. [doi: 10.3109/10826084.2012.674166]
Campbell TC ; Hoffmann NG ; Madson MB ; Melchert TP. Performance of a brief assessment tool for identifying substance use disorders. Addictive Disorders and Their Treatment 2003; 2(1): 13-17.
Hoffmann NG ; DeHart SS ; Campbell TC. Dependence: Whether a disorder or a disease; it is not a "concept." Journal of Chemical Dependency Treatment 2002;8(1):45-56.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20TAAD%20/%20Triage+Assessment+for+Addictive+Disorders%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Triage Assessment for Addictive Disorders (TAAD)</a>
<a href="http://www.evinceassessment.com/product_taad.html">Evince Clinical Assessments: TAAD</a>

SourceInfo
Evince Assessment

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1995

Notes
Information updated 200601 (MB).

AdminScoring
The TAAD is intended to be presented as an interview and not as a pencil-and-paper instrument. The instrument can be administered by any staff person with good interviewing skills, but interpretation is reserved for qualified licensed professionals. Administration should take no more than ten minutes. <p>
The results of the TAAD scoring can be coded in the template at the back of the interview. In most cases, a positive diagnosis for dependence for a given substance will be indicated if at least three DSM-IV categories are covered by at least five positive responses to the dependence items. A diagnosis for dependence may be indicated with fewer than five items if additional evidence suggests that the events constitute a clear pattern. Abuse is indicated by any positive response to any abuse criteria, but it is advisable to verify that the event or events have been recurrent. In all cases, only a qualified clinician can make the final determination of whether a diagnosis is indicated, based on all the evidence available.

ValidRely
The internal consistency reliabilities for both alcohol and drug dependence are over .92; reliability coefficients for alcohol abuse and drug abuse are over .82 and .84 respectively. Of those meeting minimal criteria for dependence, the TAAD documents more than the requisite three categories for the vast majority of cases. Most dependent persons have positive findings on five or more of the seven categories.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TAAD_inst




AccessNo
260

Name
Veterans Alcoholism Screening Test

Acronym
VAST

Developer
Magruder-Habib, K.
Harris, Katherine E.
Fraker, Glynn G.

Description
The VAST is a variant of the MAST but was designed to overcome the MAST problem of being unable to distinguish between lifetime and current problems with alcohol. The VAST contains the original 24 MAST questions and retains the MAST scoring weights but follows each original question with three questions designed to identify the specific time period to which an answer refers: within the last year (considered "current"), >1 year ago but <=5 years ago and >5 years ago. Thus, the VAST distinguishes past from current alcohol abuse. Four scores can be obtained: a MAST score, a VAST-C score (for "current" alcoholism, in the past year), a VAST 1-5 score (for alcoholism in the past 1-5 years), and a VAST >5 score (for alcoholism more than 5 years ago). It is an excellent screen for use in general medical settings, and is also good in two-stage case identification approaches. The VAST can be administered by a lay person in 5-10 minutes.

Availability
Copyright 1982, Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Inc.

Contact
Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Inc.<br>
Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies<br>
Piscataway, NJ 08854<br>
tel: 732-445-3510

ADAI
A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems, 1995 edition (HV 5279 N37t v. 4 [REF INST]).
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Veterans Alcoholism Screening Test 260.pdf [from NIAAA]

SourceRef
Magruder-Habib, K.; Harris, K.G.; and Fraker, G.G. Validation of the Veterans Alcoholism Screening Test. J Stud Alcohol 43(9):910-926, 1982.

OtherRef
Magruder-Habib K ; Saltz CC ; Barron PM. Age-related patterns of alcoholism among veterans in ambulatory care. Hosp Commun Psychiatry 1986;37(12):1251-1255.
Adams SL ; Waskel SA. Late onset alcoholism: Stress or structure. J Psychology 1993;127(3):329-334.
Magruder-Habib K ; Holly S ; Alling WC. Relative performance of the MAST, VAST, and CAGE versus DSM-III-R criteria for alcohol dependence. J Clin Epidem 1993;46(5):435-444.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Veterans+Alcoholism+Screening+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Veterans Alcoholism Screening Test (VAST)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (no longer included)

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA
METRIC

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1982

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.

ValidRely
Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/VAST_inst




AccessNo
268

Name
Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale - Modified to Reflect Obsessions and Compulsions Related to Heavy Drinking

Acronym
Y-BOCS-hd

Developer
Modell, Jack G.
Glaser, Frederick B.
Mountz, James M.
Cyr, Louis
Schmaltz, Stephen

Description
The Y-BOCS-hd was developed to reflect obsessionality and compulsivity related to heavy drinking. This instrument has been shown to be sensitive to, and specific for, the obsessive and compulsive characteristics of drinking-related thought and behavior in alcohol-abusing and alcohol-dependent populations. Preliminary data also indicate that the Y-BOCS-hd may be a useful screening instrument for the presence of alcohol abuse and dependence. The Y-BOCS-hd is especially helpful for individuals who abuse or are dependent upon alcohol. It may also be used to differentiate between these individuals and those who do not drink excessively. With appropriate modification, the scale could also be used in the evaluation of, or screening for, other addictive or compulsive disorders (this remains to be tested, however).
In clinical settings, the Y-BOCS-hd is useful for characterizing and quantifying the obsessive and compulsive qualities of heavy (alcoholic) drinking. Additionally, since there is minimal overlap of Y-BOCS-hd scores between alcoholic and nonalcoholic (control) groups, this instrument has a very high predictive power for distinguishing alcoholic from nonalcoholic individuals. One potential advantage of the Y-BOCS-hd over the CAGE and MAST questionnaires is that that Y-BOCS-hd is not dependent upon environment-dependent consequences of drinking.
In research, this instrument may be used to differentiate among subgroups of heavy drinkers (those with and without obsessive-compulsive characteristics to their drinking) and in designing treatment-matching, treatment-response studies based on Y-BOCS-hd scores. The Y-BOCS-hd is easily modifiable to study the obsessive and compulsive characteristics of other addictive disorders and may also be useful as a screening instrument for these disorders. This instrument may also be used to characterize further the similarities between alcohol abuse/dependency and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is available in pencil-and-paper self-administered or interview formats and takes about 5-10 minutes to administer.

Availability
Copyright 1992 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. A copy of the instrument is printed in the source reference (Modell et al. 1992).

Contact
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins<br>
Permissions Department<br>
tel: 800-638-3030<br>
<a href="http://www.lww.com">http://www.lww.com</a>

InstURL
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/insyboc.htm

ADAI
A complete copy of this instrument can be found in NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems, 1995 edition (HV 5279 N37t v. 4 [REF INST]). and also in the source reference (Modell et al 1992)
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/insyboc.htm [both clinician and self-administered versions, in HTML format]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale 268.pdf [from NIAAA, both clinical and self-administered formats in PDF]

SourceRef
Modell JG ; Glaser FB ; Mountz JM ; Schmaltz S ; Cyr L. Obsessive and compulsive characteristics of alcohol abuse and dependence: Quantification by a newly developed questionnaire. Alcoholism Clin Exp Res 16(2):266-271, 1992.

OtherRef
Gau SSF, Liu CY, Lee CS, Chang JC, Chang CJ, Li CF, Chen CC, Cheng ATA. Development of a Chinese version of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for Heavy Drinking. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2005;29(7):1172-1179.
Connor JP, Feeney GFX, Young RM. A Comparison of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for "Heavy Drinking" with a single item craving measure: construct validity and clinical utility. Substance Use & Misuse 2005;40:551-561.
Modell JG; Glaser FB; Cyr L; Mountz JM. Obsessive and compulsive characteristics of craving for alcohol in alcohol abuse and dependence. Alcoholism Clin Exp Res 16(2):272-274, 1992
Goodman WK ; Price LH ; Rasmussen SA ; Mazure C ; et al. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1989;46:1006-1016.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Y+BOCS%20/%20Yale+Brown+Obsessive+Compulsive+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS)</a>
<a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/y_bocs.htm">NIAAA's Assessing Alcohol Problems</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Assessment
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

InstURLHost
NIAAA

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.

ValidRely
Validity studies have also been done, using measures of criterion (predictive, concurrent, "postdictive").

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/Y-BOCS-hd_inst




AccessNo
269

Name
Young Adult Alcohol Problems Screening Test

Acronym
YAAPST

Developer
Hurlbut, Stephanie C.
Sher, Kenneth J.

Description
The YAAPST questionnaire assesses lifetime, past-year, and past-year's frequency of negative consequences of alcohol use among college students. The YAAPST assesses both traditional consequences (e.g., hangovers, blackouts, driving while intoxicated) and consequences presumed to occur at higher rates in a college student population (e.g., missing class, damaging property, getting involved in regrettable sexual situations). The YAAPST was originally comprised of 27 items, but 9 items were subsequently added. It is available in a pencil-and-paper self-administered format and can be administered in 5-10 minutes.
In clinical settings, the YAAPST can be used as a screening measure for lifetime and recent alcohol abuse. It can also be employed for the descriptive information it provides, identifying specific consequences and indicating their frequency of occurrence. Additionally, the scale may be used for diagnostic purposes by choosing a cut score (based on the desired specificity and sensitivity, compared with DIS/DSM-III diagnoses). The YAAPST is also a useful research tool with good psychometric properties. It can be used to augment traditional quantity and frequency items as well as items assessing frequency of heavy drinking.

Availability
Copyright 1992, Heldref Publications (now Taylor & Francis). No charge for use.

Contact
Kenneth J. Sher, Ph.D.<br>
Psychology Department<br>
210 McAlester Hall<br>
University of Missouri-Columbia<br>
Columbia, MO 65211<br>
email: <a href="mailto:sherk@missouri.edu">sherk@missouri.edu</a>

InstURL
http://dionysus.psych.wisc.edu/MediaWiki/index.php/Young_Adult_Alcohol_Problems_Screening_Test_%28YAP%29

SourceRef
Hurlbut, SC and Sher, KJ. Assessing alcohol problems in college students. J Am College Health 41:49-58, 1992.

OtherRef
Devos-Comby L; Lange JE. Standardized measures of alcohol-related problems: a review of their use among college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):349-361.
Torres Gonzalez MC, Palma Riveros MM, Uribi JI, Moreno Luna S. Validation of the Young Adult Alcohol Problems Screening Test "YAAPST” in a group of undergraduate students of the Pintificia Universidad Javeriana. Univ Psychol Bogotá (Colombia) 2006;5(1):175-190. (in Spanish) <a href="http://www.oalib.com/paper/2384840#.VRReBOFGzD8">English abstract online</a>

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20YAAPST%20/%20Young+Adult+Alcohol+Problems+Screening+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Young Adult Alcohol Problems Screening Test (YAAPST)</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA (1995 edition, not included in later editions; only features about four sample items, so didn't bother scanning this (MB, 200706))

InstrumentType
Assessment
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200501

Year
1992

InstURLHost
Addiction Research Laboratory Wiki, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin

AdminScoring
No special training is required for the administration of this instrument.
Scoring is done by a SAS program, which provides scores for lifetime (ever occurred), recent (occurred in past year), and the severity of problems (weighted by frequency of occurrence during the past year). The program is available from the authors.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done using test-retest and internal consistency measures. Validity studies have also been done, using measures of content, criterion, and construct.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/YAAPST_adai_inst




AccessNo
274

Name
NIAAA Alcohol Consumption Questions

Developer
NIAAA Task Force on Recommended Questions of the National Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Description
The Task Force on Recommended Alcohol Questions, a task force of NIAAA's Council met on October 15-16, 2003, in Bethesda, MD, to develop recommended minimum sets of alcohol consumption questions, for researchers in other fields who only have resources to ask a limited number of alcohol-related questions. The recommended sets of 3, 4, 5 or 6 items are presented. All of the sets of questions are aimed at eliciting patterns of consumption, not just amount consumed. <p>The 3 item set asks about the frequency of past 12 month drinking, the number of drinks consumed on a typical drinking day in the past 12 months and about the frequency of binge drinking in the past 12 months, in order to capture information about both level of consumption and drinking patterns, as recommended above. The 4 item set adds a question about the maximum number of drinks consumed in a 24-hour period in the past 12 months. This question is important because it provides additional information about drinking patterns and because it is highly correlated with alcohol use disorders. It is inserted before the binge drinking question which then becomes question 4 in the 4 item set. The 5 item set adds a question about maximum drinks in a 24 hour period in the respondent's lifetime, as the last question in the set. And finally, the 6 item set adds, as the fourth question immediately following the item about maximum drinks in a 24-hour period in the past 12 months, an item which asks about the frequency of consuming this maximum number of drinks in the past 12 months. <p>The task force consensus was that asking about alcohol consumption over the past 12 months was the best choice of timeframe.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain. The question sets are all available for free on the NIAAA web site.

InstURL
http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/guidelines-and-resources/recommended-alcohol-questions

SourceRef
NIAAA NIAAA Task Force on Recommended Questions of the National Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Recommended Sets of Alcohol Consumption Questions, October 15-16, 2003. Published on the web October 20, 2004.

OtherRef
Rehm J, Greenfield TK, Rogers JD. Average volume of alcohol consumption, patterns of drinking and all-cause mortality. Results from the U.S. National Alcohol Survey. American Journal of Epidemiology 153, 64-71, 2001.
Caetano R, Tam T, Greenfield TK, Cherpitel CJ, Midanik LT. DSM-IV alcohol dependence and drinking in the U.S. population: A risk analysis. Annals of Epidemiology 7, 542-549, 1997.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20NIAAA+Alcohol+Consumption+Questions%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: NIAAA Alcohol Consumption Questions</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://bit.ly/NIAAA4Q_inst">NIAAA-2Q/NIAAA-4Q</a>

SourceInfo
NIAAA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
NIAAA

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200501

Year
2004

InstURLHost
NIAAA

Notes
Updated 2/16/2012, MB

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/Alcohol-Consumption_inst




AccessNo
275

Name
Retrospective Alcohol and Other Substance Use Measure

Acronym
RETROSUB

Developer
Windle, Michael

Description
The Retrospective Alcohol and Other Substance Use Measure (RETROSUB) was designed to assess key elements of alcohol and other substance use, including the frequency and quantity of use, binge drinking, drinking style (e.g., steady, social or occasional, weekend), and treatment for alcohol and other substance use problems. The measure consisted of 44 items that were part of an interview protocol. The measure included a (repeat) sequence of eight items that targeted each year probed. Questions were posed in terms of alcohol or substance use during a 1-year period identified by the interviewer. The measure may be used as part of a battery to screen for levels of potential problems among incoming students in college settings or to provide reliable historical patterns of substance use for etiologic studies that are initiated with young adult samples.

Contact
Michael Windle<br>
UAB Center for the Advancement of Youth Health<br>
912 Building<br>
1530 3rd Ave. S.<br>
Birmingham, AL 35294-1200<br>
tel: 205-975-9643<br>
<a href="mailto:windle@uab.edu">windle@uab.edu</a>

ADAI
[copy of instrument NOT included in source reference]

SourceRef
Windle M. Retrospective use of alcohol and other substances by college students: Psychometric properties of a new measure. Addict Behav 2005;30:337-342.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RETROSUB%20/%20Retrospective+Alcohol+%26+Other+Substance+Use+Measure%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Retrospective Alcohol and Other Substance Use Measure (RETROSUB)</a>

SourceInfo
source reference

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Assessment
Screening

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200501

Year
2005

Notes
Guided by timeline followback and other retrospective assessments of alcohol and substance use (Fals-Stewart W, et.al., 2000; Sobell & Sobell, 1996). No copy of the instrument in the source article.

Status
public

Population
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RETROSUB_inst




AccessNo
284

Name
UNCOPE

Acronym
UNCOPE

Developer
Hoffmann, Norman G.

Description
The UNCOPE is a six-item screening tool composed of questions selected from existing instruments and assorted research reports. Keywords in the questions form the acronym UNCOPE (e.g. Use, Neglected, Cut down, etc.). It provides a simple and quick means of identifying risk for abuse and dependence for alcohol and other drugs, when neither is already clearly identified as a problem. Appropriate venues for its use would be mental health and medical clinics, employee assistance counseling, marital and family counseling. It is not appropriate for evaluating persons arrested for driving under the influence, those presenting for treatment, or those being evaluated for any issue associated with substances.<p>
<ul>
<b>U</b> - Have you spent more time drinking or using than you intended to?<br>
<b>N</b> - Have you ever neglected some of your usual responsibilities because of using alcohol or drugs?<br>
<b>C</b> - Have you felt you wanted or needed to cut down on your drinking or drug use?<br>
<b>O</b> - Has anyone objected to your drinking or drug use?<br>
<b>P</b> - Have you found yourself preoccupied with drinking or using?<br>
<b>E</b> - Have you ever used alcohol or drugs to relieve emotional discomfort, such as sadness, anger, or boredom?<br>
</ul>

Availability
The UNCOPE is available free on the web and has been printed in various publications. The questions may be used free of charge for oral administration in any medical psychosocial, or clinical interview. Attribution to the developer is requested when citing the instrument.

Contact
The Change Companies<br>
5221 Sigstrom Dr.<br>
Carson City, NV 89706<br>
tel: 888-889-8866<br>
<a href="mailto:info@changecompanies.net">info@changecompanies.net</a><br>
<a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">http://www.changecompanies.net</a>

InstURL
http://www.evinceassessment.com/UNCOPE_for_web.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\UNCOPE 284.pdf
[downloaded from Evince page]

SourceRef
Zywiak WH; Hoffmann NG; Floyd AS. Enhancing alcohol treatment outcomes through aftercare and self-help groups. Medicine & Health/Rhode Island 82(3):87-90, 1999.

OtherRef
Hoffmann NG; Hunt DE; Rhodes WM; Riley KJ. UNCOPE : A brief substance dependence screen for use with arrestees. J Drug Issues 2003;33(1):29-44
Campbell TC; Hoffmann NG; Hoffmann TD; Gillaspy JA. UNCOPE: A screen for substance dependence among state prison inmates. The Prison Journal 2005;85(1):7-17
Breshears EM; Yeh S; Young NK. Understanding Substance Abuse and Facilitating Recovery: A Guide for Child Welfare Workers. Rockville MD: SAMHSA National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare, 2004.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20UNCOPE%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: UNCOPE</a>
<a href="http://www.cffutures.org/presentations/webinars/uncope-screening-tool-substance-use-child-welfare-settings">UNCOPE: A Screening Tool for Use in Child Welfare Settings</a>.

SourceInfo
pdf doc linked above (Evince web page)

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200503

Year
1999

InstURLHost
Evince Clinical Assessments

AdminScoring
Information about scoring and psychometrics of the UNCOPE is included on the document linked above and in the cited references.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/UNCOPE_inst




AccessNo
285

Name
Cigarette Dependence Scale

Acronym
CDS-12
CDS-5

Developer
Etter, Jean-Francois
Le Houezec, J.
Perneger, Thomas V.

Description
CDS-12 is a 12-item, reliable measure of cigarette dependence. The scale is a brief, self-administered, continuous measure, useful for clinicians and researchers. A shorter, five-item version of the scale, the CDS-5, is also available.<p>
Except for tolerance, CDS-12 covers the main components of DSM-IV and ICD-10 definitions of dependence: compulsion, withdrawal symptoms, loss of control, time allocation, neglect of other activities, and persistence despite harm. The CDS-12 has better content validity and internal consistency than the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) and was a slightly better predictor of withdrawal symptoms. This scale may represent an alternative to FTND for measuring cigarette dependence.

Availability
French and English versions are appended to the source reference (Etter, 2003) and the English version is appended to the supporting reference (Etter, 2005).

Contact
Jean-Francois Etter<br>
Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine<br>
University of Geneva, CMU<br>
1 rue Michel-Servet<br>
CH-1211 Geneva 4 Switzerland<br>
<a href="mailto:jean-francois.etter@imsp.unige.ch">jean-francois.etter@imsp.unige.ch</a><br>
<a href="http://www.stop-tabac.ch">http://www.stop-tabac.ch</a>

InstURL
http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/tcrb/cds_12.html

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Cigarette Dependence Scale 285.pdf
[from Etter 2005]

SourceRef
Etter J; Le Houezec J; Perneger TV. A self-administered questionnaire to measure dependence on cigarettes: the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Neuropsychopharmacology 28:359-370, 2003. [<a href="http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v28/n2/full/1300030a.html">Full text</a>]

OtherRef
Berlin I, Singleton EG, Heishman SJ. A comparison of the Fagerström Test for Cigarette Dependence and Cigarette Dependence Scale in a treatment-seeking sample of pregnant smokers. Nicotine Tobacco Res 2016;18(4):477-83. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntv108
Courvoisier D; Etter J. Using item response theory to study the convergent and discriminant validity of three questionnaires measuring cigarette dependence. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2008;22(3):391-401.
Etter J. A comparison of the content-, construct- and predictive validity of the Cigarette Dependence Scale and the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2005;77(3):259-268. [includes copy of the scale]
Piper ME ; McCarthy DE ; Baker TB. Assessing tobacco dependence : a guide to measure evaluation and selection. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2006;8(3):339-351.
Etter J; Le Houezec J; Huguelet P; Etter M. Testing the Cigarette Dependence Scale in 4 samples of daily smokers: psychiatric clinics, smoking cessation clinics, a smoking cessation website and in the general population. Addictive Behaviors 2009;34(5):446-50.
Courvoisier DS; Etter J. Comparing the predictive validity of five cigarette dependence questionnaires. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010; 107(2-3):128-133.



Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CDS%20/%20Cigarette+Dependence+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Cigarette Dependence Scale (CDS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref and Other Ref (Etter, 2003, 2005)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, PM

EntryDate
200501

Year
2003

InstURLHost
NCI Tobacco Control Research

ValidRely
Both the CDS-12 and CDS-5 fulfill several criteria of content and construct validity and are sensitive to change over time. More details about the psychometrics of these instruments are available in the source and supporting references.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
Smokers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CDS_inst




AccessNo
289

Name
Drug Attitude Inventory

Acronym
DAI

Developer
Hogan, Thomas P.
Awad, A.G.
Eastwood, Robin

Description
The Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI) assesses the patient's subjective response to medications. The instrument focuses on unpleasant and negative subjective responses that are common adverse effects of anti-psychotic medications. In clinical settings, the DAI may be used to identify patients at highest risk for poor compliance with prescribed medications related to subjective medication response. Such patients may benefit from a medication change. Other psychotherapeutic interventions may also be appropriate. The DAI is a brief, easy-to-use self-report instrument that consists of 10 items and takes 10 minutes to complete. It provides a reliable and valid assessment of dysphoric response to antipsychotic medication treatment.

Availability
The DAI has been published by Hogan et.al. (1983). Copies may also be obtained from the author (Awad). No formal permission is required to use the DAI; however, it should be properly cited in all publications. It is available without cost. A scoring manual is included in Awad (1993) or may be obtained from the author. The DAI has been translated into Chinese, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Polish, and Spanish.

Contact
A. George Awad, M.D.<br>
Clarke Institute of Psychiatry<br>
250 College Street, Ste. 724<br>
Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada<br>
tel: 416-979-6865

ADAI
The measure is included on the CD-ROM that accompanies the APA Handbook.

SourceRef
Hogan TP, Awad AG, Eastwood R. A self-report scale predictive of drug compliance in schizophrenics: reliability and discriminative validity. Psychol Med 1983;13:177-183.

OtherRef
Townsend L, Floersch J, Findling RL. Adolescent attitudes toward psychiatric medication: The utility of the Drug Attitude Inventory. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2009;50(12):1523-31. [<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/19686336/?tool=pubmed">free online</a>]
Rossi, Alessandro; Arduini, Luca; De Cataldo, Stefano; Stratta, Paolo. Subjective response to neuroleptic medication: A validation study of the Italian version of the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI). [Italian]. Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale 2001;10(2): 107-114.
Awad AD. Subjective response to neuroleptics in schizophrenia. Schizophr Bull 1993;19:609-618.

SourceInfo
APA

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
APA

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200503

Year
1983

AdminScoring
Patients with low literacy or severe psychotic symptoms may need assistance from the staff to complete the DAI. No training is required to read the items to patients who are unable to read the items themselves.

GoldStar
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/goldstar2.gif

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DAI_inst




AccessNo
300

Name
Hooked on Nicotine Checklist

Acronym
HONC

Developer
DiFranza, Joseph R
Savegeau, Judith A
Fletcher, K.
Ockene, J.K.
Rigotti, N.A.
McNeil, A.D.
Coleman, M.
Wood, C.

Description
The Hooked on Nicotine Checklist (HONC) is a 10-item screening tool originally developed to assess loss of autonomy over tobacco in adolescent smokers. It is a standardized index that can be applied across the lifespan because it is sufficiently sensitive to pinpoint the onset of lost autonomy in novice smokers and reliably distinguishes between degrees of lost autonomy among those who have been smoking for many years. The ability to use the HONC with both adult and adolescent smokers, including low-dose smokers, allows for comparisons between these populations and represents a significant strength of the HONC.<p>
The HONC may be useful to practicing clinicians as a self-administered office tool. It identifies youths for whom help and encouragement with cessation would be appropriate. As a self-assessment tool, the HONC might promote progression to a more advanced stage of change, stimulating youths to attempt cessation earlier when success is more likely. The HONC could be used in mass media campaigns to educate youths to recognize the first signs of dependence. In research applications, a HONC score of 1 or higher would be more appropriate for defining the transition from "experimental" to "established" smoking than either "lifetime use of 100 cigarettes" or "daily smoking," as these measures do not assess dependence. The HONC is being adopted as a measure of dependence and a predictor of relapse in ongoing smoking cessation trials.

Availability
A comprehensive manual for the HONC (as well as a copy of the scale itself with translations in French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish, and Portuguese) can be downloaded from the Family Medicine and Community Health web site: <a href="http://fmchapps.umassmed.edu/honc/TOC.htm">http://fmchapps.umassmed.edu/honc/TOC.htm</a>.

Contact
Joseph R. DiFranza, M.D.<br>
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health<br>
University of Massachusetts Medical School<br>
55 Lake Ave. N.<br>
Worcester, MA 01655<br>
tel: 508-856-5658<br>
<a href="mailto:difranzj@ummhc.org">difranzj@ummhc.org</a>

InstURL
http://www.tobaccorecovery.org/media/files/The%20Hooked%20on%20Nicotine%20Checklist%20%28HONC%29.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Hooked on Nicotine Checklist 300.pdf
[from Wellman 2005 ref]

SourceRef
DiFranza JR; Savageau JA; Fletcher K; Ockene JK; Rigotti NA; McNeill AD; Coleman M; Wood C. Measuring the loss of autonomy over nicotine use in adolescents: The Development and Assessment of Nicotine Dependence in Youths (DANDY) Study. Archives of Pediatric Adolescent Medicine 2002;156:397-403.

OtherRef
Wellman RJ ; DiFranza JR ; Pbert L ; Fletcher KE ; Flint A ; Young MH ; Druker S. A comparison of the psychometric properties of the hooked on nicotine checklist and the modified Fagerstrom tolerance questionnaire. Addictive Behaviors 2006;31(3):486-495.
Wellman RJ ; Savageau JA ; Godiwala S ; Savageau N ; Friedman K ; Hazelton J ; DiFranza JR. A comparison of the Hooked on Nicotine Checklist and the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence in adult smokers. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2006;8(4):575-580.
Wellman RJ, DiFranza JR, Savegeau JA, Godiwala S, Friedman K, Hazelton J. Measuring adults' loss of autonomy over nicotine use: The Hooked on Nicotine Checklist. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2005;7(1):157-161
Wheeler KC; Fletcher KE; Wellman RJ; DiFranza JR. Screening adolescents for nicotine dependence: The Hooked on Nicotine Checklist. Journal of Adolescent Health 2004;35:225-230.
Sledjeski EM; Dierker LC; Costello D; Shiffman S; Donny E; Flay BR; Tobacco Etiology Research Network (TERN). Predictive validity of four nicotine dependence measures in a college sample. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2007;87:10-19.
Kleinjan M; van den Eijnden RJJM; van Leeuwe J; Otten R; Brug J; Engels RCME. Factorial and convergent validity of nicotine dependence measures in adolescents: Toward a multidimensional approach. Nicotine and Tobacco Research 2007;9(11):1109-1118.
Scragg R ; Wellman RJ ; Laugesen M ; DiFranza JR. Diminished autonomy over tobacco can appear with the first cigarettes. Addictive Behaviors 2008;33(5):689-698.
Carpenter MJ; Baker NL; Gray KM; Upadhyaya HP. Assessment of nicotine dependence among adolescent and young adult smokers: a comparison of measures. Addictive Behaviors 2010;35(11):977-982.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20HONC%20/%20Hooked+on+Nicotine+Checklist%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Hooked on Nicotine Checklist (HONC)</a>

SourceInfo
Wellman (2005) ref.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
ns, PM

EntryDate
200508

Year
2002

InstURLHost
TobaccoRecovery.org

AdminScoring
The 10-item self-administered screening tool takes about 5 minutes to complete. A smoker's endorsement of any item indicates some loss of autonomy over tobacco, and the sum of endorsed items indicates the degree to which autonomy has been lost.

ValidRely
Construct validity was demonstrated by its utility in predicting failed cessation and the progression of tobacco use. In addition, the psychometric properties were excellent (DiFranza, 2002). The Wellman (2005) reference includes more detailed information on validity and reliability in adult smokers.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
Smokers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/HONC_inst




AccessNo
303

Name
Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument

Acronym
MAYSI

Developer
Grisso, Thomas

Description
The MAYSI was developed in 1994 with an updated version, the MAYSI-2, released in 2000 (no questions were changed for the MAYSI-2). It is a 52-item brief screening instrument designed to identify potential mental health needs or emotional disturbances, including alcohol or drug use, for youths aged 12-17 years old at any entry or transitional placement point in the juvenile justice system. Subscales include: Alcohol/Drug Use, Angry-Irritable, Depressed-Anxious, Somatic Complaints, Suicide Ideation, Thought Disturbance, and Traumatic Experiences. Only a fifth-grade reading level is required, though questions can also be read to children unable to read themselves.

Availability
Spanish language paper-and-pencil version and English language CD-ROM are available. If you would like to use the MAYSI-2, you may do so if you complete and send in the form (the MAYSI-2 registry) that is provided in the manual. Once you have registered, however, you may use the instrument without any charges.

Contact
Professional Resource Press<br>
P.O. Box 15560<br>
Sarasota, FL 34277-1560<br>
<a href="http://www.prpress.com/MAYSI-2-2006-Massachusetts-Youth-Screening-Instrument-Users-Manual-Technical-Report-_p_170.html">http://www.prpress.com/MAYSI-2-2006-Massachusetts-Youth-Screening-Instrument-Users-Manual-Technical-Report-_p_170.html</a>

SourceRef
Grisso T ; Barnum R. Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument (MAYSI): Preliminary manual and technical report. Worcester, MA : University of Massachusetts Medical School, 1998.

OtherRef
Grisso, T., & Barnum, R. (2000). Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2): User's manual and technical report. Worschester, MA: University of Massachusetts Medical School.
Grisso T; Barnum R; Fletcher KE; Cauffman E; Peuschold D. Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument for mental health needs of juvenile justice youths. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2001;40(5):514-8. [about the MAYSI-2]

SourceInfo
NFATTC

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

Recommended
NFATTC

EnteredBy
MB, PM

EntryDate
200507

Year
1994

Notes
Selected as an evidence based adolescent screening instrument in: Dembo, Richard. Introduction. Subst Use & Misuse 2005;40(7):879-885.

AdminScoring
The MAYSI (and MAYSI-2) consists of 52 items and takes approximately 8-10 minutes for administration. It is a pencil and paper self-report inventory. Scores for scales are the number of "yes" responses circled by the youth. A scoring key is used by the scorer and then transferred to a Scoring Profile. The Scoring Profile indicates if score is beyond two levels called "Caution" and "Warning." These levels indicate need for special attention, evaluation, or intervention.
No specific training is required for test administration.

ValidRely
Reliability studies have been done on the MAYSI (test-retest). Measures of construct validity have also been done.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MAYSI_inst




AccessNo
310

Name
Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test - Geriatric version

Acronym
MAST-G

Developer
Blow, Frederick C.

Description
Warning signs of substance abuse (e.g. sleep problems, falls, or confusion) can be confused with or masked by other illness or chronic conditions associated with aging. The MAST-G was developed by the University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center specifically for older adults. It has has high sensitivity and specificity among older adults recruited from a wide range of settings, including primary care clinics, nursing homes, and older adult congregate housing locations.

<p> The MAST-G has 24 questions and can be administered as part of the intake process when alcohol problems are suspected. A response of "yes" to six or more questions indicates a need for followup. The short form of the MAST-G can be used when time does not permit use of the MAST-G. (The CAGE was recommended for patients over 60 by the Consensus Panel authors of CSAT TIP 24, which is directed at primary care providers.)

Availability
Copyright Regents of the University of Michigan, 1991. Available in TIP 26, which is available for free on-line (see link in Instrument URL field below).

Contact
Frederick C. Blow, PhD<br>
Universityof Michigan Alcohol Research Center<br>
400 E. Eisenhower Parkway, Suite A<br>
Ann Arbor, MI 48104<br>
tel: 313-998-7952

InstURL
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64419/

ADAI
TIP 26, HTML version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64419/

SourceRef
Blow FC, Brower KJ, Schulenberg JE, Demo-Dananberg LM, Young JP, Beresford TP. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test - Geriatric version (MAST-G): A new elderly-specific screening instrument. Alcoholism: Clin Exper Res 1992;16:372 [abstract of presentation at annual meeting of RSA, 1992, San Diego, CA]

OtherRef
Moore AA ; Seeman T ; Morgenstern H ; Beck JC ; Reuben DB. Are there differences between older persons who screen positive on the CAGE questionnaire and the Short Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test - Geriatric Version? J Am Geriatr Soc 2002;50:858-862

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MAST-G%20/%20Michigan%20Alcoholism%20Screening%20Test%20Geriatric%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Michican Alcoholism Screening Test - Geriatric version (MAST-G)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20156%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST)</a>

SourceInfo
see TIP 26

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

Recommended
TIP 26

EnteredBy
ns

Year
1991

InstURLHost
HSTAT

Status
public

Population
Adults

MatrixRecd
Megan

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MAST-G_inst




AccessNo
311

Name
Simple Screening Instrument for Substance Abuse
Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse

Acronym
SSI-SA
SSI-SOA
SSI-AOD

Developer
Winters, Ken C
Zenilman, Jonathan M
(Consensus Panel Co-chairs)

Description
The SSI-SA was designed for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) to encompass a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms for substance use disorders, and particularly to screen patients in mental health settings for co-occurring substance abuse disorders. It is consistent with a biopsychosocial view of substance use disorders, the view adopted by the World Health Organization and the American Psychiatric Association. The SSI-SA has 16 items, of which 14 were derived from existing drug and alcohol screening tools. Fourteen of the items are scored, thus scores can range from 0 to 14; a score of 4 or greater has become the established cut-off point warranting a referral for a full assessment. This scale has also been called the "Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drugs" or SSI-SOA.<p>

The SSI-SA measures five domains: 1) Substance consumption; 2) Preoccupation and loss of control; 3) Adverse consequences; 4) Problem recognition; and 5) Tolerance and withdrawal. <p>

The SSI-SA is available in both interview and self-administered formats. It has been used with a variety of populations including those in correction-based drug treatment programs, treatment for co-occurring disorders, drug courts, adolescent medical patients, and homeless patients. Its simplicity makes it easy to incorporate into treatment services. Ideally the screening test should be given in its entirety, but if that is not feasible, a subset of 4 items can be administered -- questions 1,2,3 and 16 -- which constitute the short form of the instrument.<p>

The Simple Screening Instrument for Substance Abuse is recommended in CSAT TIP 42 (see below) for use in mental health settings to screen for substance abuse issues.

Availability
The SSI-SA is in the public domain and can be used without charge or permission, and can be reproduced without limit, according to the instructions.

InstURL
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64197/

ADAI
TIP 42, Appendix H, HTML version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64197/

SourceRef
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders. (Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 42). Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005. Appendix H: Screening Instruments, pp. 497-512.
Winters K; Zenilman J. Simple screening instrument for outreach for alcohol and other drug abuse and infectious diseases (Vol. 11 Publication number SMA 02-3683). Rockville, MD : Center for Substance Abuse Treatment: US Department of Health and Human Services (SAMHSA).

OtherRef
Kills Small NJ; Simons JS; Stricherz M. Assessing criterion validity of the Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (SSI-AOD) in a college population. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(10):2425-2431.
Knight JR; Goodman E; Pulerwitz T: DuRant RH. Reliabilities of short substance abuse screening tests among adolescent medical patients. Pediatrics 2000;105(4 pt 2): 948-953
Knight JR; Wechsler H; Kuo M; Seibring M; et al. Alcohol abuse and dependence among U.S. college students. J Stud Alcohol 2002;63:263-270

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SSI+SA%20/%20Simple+Screening+Instrument+for+Substance+Abuse%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Simple Screening Instrument for Substance Abuse (SSI-SA)</a>

RelatedInst
Modified Simple Screening Instrument for Substance Abuse <a href="http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/qi/qi-mssi-sa-en.pdf">
http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/qi/qi-mssi-sa-en.pdf</a>

SourceInfo
TIP 42 Appendix H; see also TIP 11 (original source)

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
TIP 16
TIP 42

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200505

Year
1994

InstURLHost
TIP 42 (CSAT)

Notes
Early versions had other names: Simple Screening Instrument for Outreach for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse; Simple Screening Instrument (SSI), and Simple Screening Instrument for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (SSI-AOD).

ValidRely
Studies have shown the SSI-SA to have high sensitivity and excellent test-retest reliability. (see source reference).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SSI-SA_inst




AccessNo
312

Name
Mental Health Screening Form - III

Acronym
MHSF-III

Developer
Carroll, Jerome FX
McGinley, John L

Description
The Mental Health Screening Form-III (MHSF-III) is a 17-item instrument designed as a mental health screening tool for clients seeking admission to substance abuse treatment programs. Preliminary examination of the instrument has shown it to be reliable and valid.<p>

Each question is answered either "yes" or "no." All questions reflect the respondent's entire life history; therefore all questions begin with the phrase "Have you ever. . ." The preferred mode of administration is for staff members to read each item to respondents and get their "yes" and "no" responses, then follow up "yes" responses with more probing. The MHSF-III can also be given directly to clients to complete, providing they have sufficient reading skills. <p>

The first four questions on the MHSF-III are not unique to any particular diagnosis; however, questions 5 through 17 reflect symptoms associated with the following diagnoses/diagnostic categories: Q5, Schizophrenia; Q6, Depressive Disorders; Q7, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder; Q8, Phobias; Q9, Intermittent Explosive Disorder; Q10, Delusional Disorder; Q11, Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders; Q12, Eating Disorders (Anorexia, Bulimia); Q13, Manic Episode; Q14, Panic Disorder; Q15, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Q16, Pathological Gambling; and Q17, Learning Disorder and Mental Retardation.<p>

The Mental Health Screening Form-III is recommended in CSAT TIP 42 (see below) for use in substance abuse treatment settings to screen for mental health problems.

Availability
Copyright 2000 by Project Return Foundation, Inc. The MHSF-III may be reproduced or copied, in entirety, without permission. Citation of the source is appreciated.

InstURL
http://www.idph.state.ia.us/bh/common/pdf/substance_abuse/integrated_services/jackson_mentalhealth_screeningtool.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Mental Health Screening Form - III 312.pdf [downloaded from SAMHSA site]

SourceRef
Carroll JFX, McGinley JJ. A screening form for identifying mental health problems in alcohol/other drug dependent persons. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 2001;19(4):33-47.

OtherRef
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders. (Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 42). Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005. Appendix H: Screening Instruments, pp. 497-512.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Mental+Health+Screening+Form%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Mental Health Screening Form - III (MHSF-III)</a>

SourceInfo
TIP 42 Appendix H; see also Contact URL

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire
Psychological assessment

Recommended
TIP 42

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200505

Year
2000

InstURLHost
Iowa Dept of Public Health

AdminScoring
The instrument requires minimal training to use. Most clients complete it in 15 minutes. The MHSF-III features a "Total Score" line to reflect the total number of "yes" responses. The maximum score on the MHSF-III is 18 (question 6 has two parts). This feature will permit programs to do research and program evaluation on the mental health-chemical dependence interface for their clients.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MHSF-III_inst




AccessNo
319

Name
Internet Addiction Scale

Acronym
IAS

Developer
Nichols, Laura A.
Nicki, Richard

Description
The Internet Addiction Scale (IAS) is a 31-item self-report instrument based on the 7 substance dependence criteria from the DSM-IV, plus 2 additional criteria recommended by Griffiths (1998). Scale items are rated on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = never, 2 = rarely, 3 = sometimes, 4 = frequently, 5 = always), with higher scores representing greater Internet addiction.

Contact
Laura A. Nichols<br>
Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick<br>
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 6E4<br>
Canada<br>
<a href="mailto:z77az@unb.ca">z77az@unb.ca</a>

ADAI
[scale items NOT included in source reference]

SourceRef
Nichols LA, Nicki R. Development of a psychometrically sound Internet Addiction Scale: A preliminary step. Psychol Addict Behav 2004;18(4):381-4.

OtherRef
Nichols, L. A., & Nicki, R. M. (2000, June). Does Internet addiction really exist? A need to develop a psychometrically sound assessment scale. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Psychological Association, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Griffiths M. Internet addiction: Does it really exist? Psychology and the Internet. In: Jayne Gackenbach (ed.). Psychology and the Internet. New York : Academic Press, 1998, pp. 61-75.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Internet+Addiction+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Internet Addiction Scale (IAS)</a>

SourceInfo
source article

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, PM

EntryDate
200505

Year
2004

AdminScoring
The IAS should be scored by adding Likert responses across the 31 items. The developers suggest a cutoff score of 93 (3 × 31 items) as indicative of possible Internet addiction.

ValidRely
The IAS is a highly reliable and internally consistent measure (Cronbach's [alpha] = .95). The IAS has good content validity, and its construct validity was also supported, as Family and Social Loneliness were found to be strongly associated with IAS scores.

Status
public

Population
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IAS_inst




AccessNo
321

Name
CAGE - Adapted to Include Drugs

Acronym
CAGE-AID

Developer
Brown, Richard L.
Saunders, Laura A.

Description
The CAGE-AID modifies the CAGE questions for use in screening for drugs other than alcohol. Like the CAGE, the CAGE-AID focuses on lifetime use; although individuals who are drug dependent may screen positive, individuals who are at risk may not not. In a study of its usefulness in a community family practice (Brown & Rounds, 1991), it had a sensitivity of 79 percent and a specificity of 77 percent. The authors suggested that stigma associated with illicit drugs may have limited its sensitivity. Limitations of the CAGE-AID are similar to the CAGE, in that it does not distinguish between active and inactive problems and has not been validated for identifying hazardous or harmful use.
<p>

1. Have you ever felt that you ought to <b>C</b>ut down on your drinking or drug use?<br>
2. Have people <b>A</b>nnoyed you by criticizing your drinking or drug use?<br>
3. Have you ever felt bad or <b>G</b>uilty about your drinking or drug use?<br>
4. Have you ever had a drink or used drugs first thing in the morning (<b>E</b>ye-opener) to steady your nerves, e.g. get rid of a hangover, or get the day started?

<p>

One or more "yes" responses constitute a positive screening test. Note, however, that due to language barriers, individual interpretation of the questions, or other confounding factors, individuals answering "no" to all CAGE -AID questions may still be at risk due to elevated drinking or drug use levels.

<p>

The CAGE-AID has been validated as four-item self-report and parent-report versions as a screen for substance use disorders among adolescents in mental health care.

Availability
This measure is in the public domain.

InstURL
http://www.integration.samhsa.gov/clinical-practice/screening-tools

ADAI
TIP16/24, HTML version http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=hstat5.table.46449

SourceRef
Brown RL, Rounds LA. Conjoint screening questionnaires for alcohol and other drug abuse: Criterion validity in a primary care practice. Wis Med J 1995;94:135-140.

OtherRef
Hinkin CH, Castellon SA, Dickson-Fuhrman E, Daum G, Jaffe J, Jarvik L. Screening for drug and alcohol abuse among older adults using a modified version of the CAGE. Am J Addict 2001;10:319-326.
Couwenbergh C; Van Der Gaag RJ; Koeter M; De Ruiter C; Van Den Brink W. Screening for substance abuse among adolescents: validity of the CAGE-AID in youth mental health care. Substance Use and Misuse 2009;44(6):823-834.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CAGE+AID%20/%20CAGE+adapted+to+include+drugs%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: CAGE-AID</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2058%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CAGE</a>

SourceInfo
tip 16, tip 24

InstrumentType
Screening

Recommended
TIP 16
TIP 24

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200505

Year
1991

InstURLHost
SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions

AdminScoring
One or more "yes" responses constitute a positive screening test. Note, however, that due to language barriers, individual interpretation of the questions, or other confounding factors, individuals answering "no" to all CAGE -AID questions may still be at risk due to elevated drinking or drug use levels.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Co-occurring clients
Adults

AltURL
http://adai.uw.edu/instruments/pdf/CAGE-AID.pdf

AltURLHost
Download on ADAI website.

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAGE-AID_inst




AccessNo
330

Name
Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test - Revised

Acronym
SAAST-R

Developer
Vickers-Douglas, Kristin S
Patten, Christi A
Decker, Paul A
Offord, Kenneth P
Colligan, Robert C
Islam-Zwart, Kayleen A
Wolter, Troy D
Croghan, Ivana T
Hall-Flavin, Daniel
Hurt, Richard D

Description
The SAAST-R is a brief (31-item) alcoholism screening measure for use in research and clinical practice. Although the original SAAST (Swenson and Morse, 1975) is a sensitive and valid alcohol screening measure, several research and clinical issues related to use of the SAAST supported the need for a revision. This revised version of the SAAST allows for: improved assessment of lifetime experience of alcohol-related problems; differentiation between current and past drinking status; separation of respondents who are in recovery from alcoholism from those manifesting current alcoholism; inclusion of screening items associated with the DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence or abuse in the item pool; and updating the language of the items.
It may be useful in epidemiological studies when the researcher is interested in capturing lifetime experience of alcohol use-related problems and current drinking status with a brief self-report measure, or when researchers are collecting this information by mail.

Availability
Copyright information is unavailable. The test items are included in the source article.

Contact
Kristin S. Vickers-Douglas, Ph.D.<br>
Mayo Clinic<br>
200 First St., SW<br>
Rochester, MN 55905<br>
<a href="mailto:vickersdouglas.kristin@mayo.edu">vickersdouglas.kristin@mayo.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Self Administered Alcoholism Screening Test Revised 330.pdf [from source reference]

SourceRef
Vickers-Douglas KS ; Patten CA ; Decker PA ; Offord KP ; Colligan RC ; Islam-Zwart KA ; Wolter TD ; Croghan IT ; Hall-Flavin D ; Hurt RD. Revision of the Self- Administered Alcoholism Screening Test (SAAST-R): a pilot study. Substance Use & Misuse 2005;40(6):789-812. [includes listing of scale items]

OtherRef
Swenson WM ; Morse RM. The use of a self-administered alcoholism screening test (SAAST) in a medical center. Mayo Clin Proc 1975;50:204-208.
Patten CA; Vickers KS; Offord KP; Decker PA; Colligan RC; Bronars C; Reese MM; Seime RJ; Hall-Flavin DK; Hurt RD. Validation of the Revised Self-Administered Alcohol Screening Test (SAAST-R). American Journal on Addictions 2006;15(6):409-421.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SAAST-R%20/%20Self+Administered+Alcoholism+Screening+Test+Revised%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test - Revised (SAAST-R)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20215%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Self-Administered Alcoholism Screening Test (SAAST)</a>

SourceInfo
Source article

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200506

Year
2005

AdminScoring
In scoring the SAAST-R, the total number of items, 1-29, endorsed in the alcoholic direction was summed. Item 19 consists of six separate items and each counted individually in the scoring. Items 30 and 31 were not included in the scoring algoirthm. Instead, the responses to these items are to assist the clinician or researcher in considering the total SAAST-R score in the context of the patient's most recent alcohol use and lifetime experience regarding alcohol use. Total scores can range from 0 to 34.

ValidRely
Results from the pilot study suggest that the SAAST-R is highly correlated with the original SAAST, has a similar factor structure, good internal consistency, and correctly identifies those in recovery from alcoholism.<p>The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the SAAST-R have not been determined. A SAAST-R validation study is now in progress to address this issue with additional refinements to the instrument.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SAAST-R_inst




AccessNo
331

Name
Mood Disorder Questionnaire

Acronym
MDQ

Developer
Hirschfeld, Robert M.A.
Williams, Janet B.W.
Spitzer, Robert L.
Calabrese, Joseph R.
Flynn, Laurie
Keck, Paul E. Jr.
Lewis, Lydia
McElroy, Susan L.
Post, Robert M.
Rapport, Daniel J.
Russell, James M.
Sachs, Gary S.
Zajecka, John

Description
The MDQ is a validated screening tool for bipolar disorder in a psychiatric outpatient population. It consists of 15 questions and takes about 5 minutes to complete. The first 13 questions about possible symptoms are answered with either "yes" or "no." The other two questions assess family history, past diagnoses, and disease severity. Bipolar disorder is commonly misdiagnosed; use of the MDQ can identify 70% of persons with bipolar disorder while eliminating the diagnosis for 90% to 100% of persons without the condition. An adolescent self-report version of this scale is also available (A-MDQ), along with a parents' version (P-MDQ) in which parents report on symptoms of mania in their children.

Availability
The questionnaire, instructions for its use, and the scoring algorithm can all be found in the source reference as well as on the web.

Contact
Dr. Robert M. Hirschfeld<br>
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical Branch<br>
University of Texas at Galveston<br>
1.302 Rebecca Sealy<br>
301 University Blvd.<br>
Galveston, TX 77555-0188<br>
<a href="mailto:rohirsch@utmb.edu">rohirsch@utmb.edu</a>

InstURL
http://www.integration.samhsa.gov/images/res/MDQ.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Mood Disorder Questionnaire 331.pdf
[from source ref]

SourceRef
Hirschfeld RM; Williams JB; Spitzer RL; et.al. Development and validation of a screening instrument for bipolar spectrum disoder: The Mood Disorder Questionnaire. American Journal of Psychiatry 2000;157:1873-1875.

OtherRef
Das AK; Olfson M; Gameroff MJ; Pilowsky DJ; Blanco C; Feder A; Gross R; Neria Y; Lantigua R; Shea S; Weissman MM. Screening for Bipolar Disorder in a Primary Care Practice. JAMA 2005 Feb 23; 293(8):956-963.
Hirschfeld RM; Holzer C; Calabrese JR; Weissman M; Reed M; Davies M; Frye MA; Keck P; McElroy S; Lewis L; Tierce J; Wagner KD; Hazard E. Validity of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire: A General Population Study. American Journal of Psychiatry 2003 Jan 1;160(1):178-180.
Wagner KD; Hirschfeld RM; Emslie GJ; Findling RL; Gracious BL; Reed ML. Validation of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire for bipolar disorders in adolescents. J Clin Psychiatry 2006;67(5):827-30. [A-MDQ and P-MDQ]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Mood+Disorder+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Carter WP; Torguson L; Gardner NC. Bipolar disorder: addressing selective compliance in patients with bipolar depression: an expert panel discussion. Behavioral Health Management 2005 May/Jun;25(3):39-48.
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire
Psychological assessment

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200506

Year
2000

InstURLHost
SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions

Notes
Updated by MB, 8/8/2006

AdminScoring
The MDQ can be administered either by the clinician or self-administered by the patient, and takes about 5 minutes to complete. It can be quickly
and easily scored by a physician, nurse, or any trained medical staff assistant.

ValidRely
This instrument has demonstrated validity and sensitivity.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MDQ_inst




AccessNo
332

Name
Athlete Drinking Scale

Acronym
ADS

Developer
Martens, Matthew P.
Watson, Jack C., II
Royland, Elizabeth M.
Beck, Niels C.

Description
The Athlete Drinking Scale measures intercollegiate athlete alcohol use and alcohol-related problems by assessing sport-related factors. It includes 3 subscales: Positive Reinforcement, Team/Group, and Sport-Related Stress. Questions include such things as "I enjoy the feeling of getting drunk," "I drink to have a good time with my teammates," and "If I've performed well, I feel like I can go out and drink a little more than usual." The authors believe that the ADS may have promise as an educational, screening, and intervention tool with intercollegiate athletes, but additional criterion validity studies need to be conducted.

Availability
The full text of the instrument is available in the appendix of the source article.

Contact
Matthew P. Martens<br>
Dept. of Educational and Counseling Psychology, ED220<br>
University at Albany, State University of New York<br>
1400 Washington Ave.<br>
Albany, NY 12222<br>
<a href="mailto:mmartens@uamail.albany.edu">mmartens@uamail.albany.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Athlete Drinking Scale 332.pdf
[from source ref]

SourceRef
Martens MP ; Watson, JC, II ; Royland EM ; Beck NC. Development of the Athlete Drinking Scale. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2005 Jun;19(2):158-164. [includes copy of scale]

OtherRef
Herring TE, et al. Utility of the Athlete Drinking Scale for assessing drinking motives among high school athletes. Addict Behav 2016;60:18-23. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.03.026
Martens MP, Labrie JW, Hummer JF, Pedersen ER. Understanding sport-related drinking motives in college athletes: Psychometric analyses of the Athlete Drinking Scale. Addictive Behaviors 2008;33(7):974-977.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Athlete+Drinking+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Athlete Drinking Scale (ADS)</a>
<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Athlete+Drinking+Scale%22[All+Fields]">PubMed Search: Athlete Drinking Scale (ADS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200507

Year
2005

ValidRely
The internal consistency and construct validity of this scale's subscales have been supported, however more psychometric studies need to be conducted.

Status
public

Population
College students
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AthleteDrinkingScale_inst




AccessNo
344

Name
Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire

Acronym
PDSQ

Developer
Zimmerman, Mark
Mattia, Jill I.

Description
The PDSQ is a 112 item, self-administered, psychiatric screening tool which has been tested extensively in primary care and general psychiatric populations. It was designed to screen for 13 DSM-IV disorders in five areas. The final version of the questionnaire contains 13 subscales (major depressive disorder [MDD], bulimia, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD], panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder [GAD], obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD], alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, somatization, hypochondriasis, and psychosis). Additionally, there is a six-item psychosis screen.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. Available for purchase from Western Psychological Services: <a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,70444&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL">http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,70444&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL</a>

ADAI
[source reference does NOT include list of scale items]

SourceRef
Zimmerman M, Mattia JI. The reliability and validity of a screening questionnaire for 13 DSM-IV Axis I disorders (the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire) in psychiatric outpatients. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 1999;60:677-683.

OtherRef
Rush B, Castel S, Brands B, Toneatto T, Veldhuizen S. Validation and comparison of diagnostic accuracy of four screening tools for mental disorders in people seeking treatment for substance use disorders. J Subst Abuse Treat 2013;44(4):375-83.
Magruder KM, Sonne SC, Brady KT, Quello S, Martin RH. Screening for co-occurring mental disorders in drug treatment populations. Journal of Drug Issues 2005;35(3):593-606.
Zimmerman M, Mattia JI. The Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire: Development, reliability and validity. Comprehensive Psychiatry 2001;42(3):175-189.
Zimmerman M, Mattia JI. A self-report scale to help make psychiatric diagnoses: The Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire. Archives of General Psychiatry 2001;58:787-794.

Resources
<a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,70444&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL">Western Psychological Services site on the PDSQ</a>

SourceInfo
Other ref (Magruder, 2005)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening
Psychological assessment

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200511

Year
1999

AdminScoring
Administration takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes.
The 112 yes-or-no items can be quickly hand scored to obtain a Total Score (which functions as a global indicator of psychopathology) plus scale scores for 13 disorders. Cutoff scores, critical items, and follow-up interview guides are provided for each disorder.

ValidRely
Each of the subscales have achieved good to excellent levels of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant, convergent, and concurrent validity.

Status
public

Population
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PDSQ_inst




AccessNo
346

Name
CRAFFT

Acronym
CRAFFT

Developer
Knight, John R.
Shrier, Lydia
Bravender, Terrill.D.
Farrell, Michelle
Vander Bilt, Joni
Shaffer, Howard J.

Description
This instrument is a brief test for screening alcohol and other drugs use in adolescents. A 6-item test was constructed by combining and modifying items from the RAFFT test, with additional items from the DAP and the POSIT. CRAFFT is a mnemonic based on individual items: The 6 items are:

<ul><li>Have you ever ridden in a <b>CAR</b> driven by someone (including yourself) who was high or had been using alcohol or drugs?
<li>Do you ever use alcohol or drugs to <b>RELAX</b>, feel better about yourself, or fit in?
<li>Do you ever use alcohol or drugs while you are by yourself (<b>ALONE</b>)?
<li>Do you ever <b>FORGET</b> things you did while using alcohol or drugs?
<li>Do your family or <b>FRIENDS</b> ever tell you that you should cut down on your drinking or drug use?
<li>Have you ever gotten into <b>TROUBLE</b> while you were using alcohol or drugs?</ul><p>

These 6 items evaluate certain events or behaviors over the entire lifetime, irrespective of when they occurred.

Availability
The six items are printed in the description above, and are widely available on the internet.

Contact
John R. Knight, MD<br>
Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research<br>
Children's Hospital<br>
300 Longwood Ave<br>
Boston, MA 02115<br>
<a href="mailto:knight_j@a1.tch.harvard.edu">knight_j@a1.tch.harvard.edu</a>

InstURL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRAFFT_Screening_Test

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Articles\CRAFFT Knight 1999.pdf
[this is the entire article -- would not let me extract just Table 1, which
contains the 9 original scale items and a note about which 6 ended up in
the final instrument]

SourceRef
Knight JR; Shrier LA; Bravender TD; Farrell M; Vander Bilt J; Shaffer HJ. A new brief screen for adolescent substance abuse. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescecent Medicine 1999 Jun;153(6):591-6. <a href="http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/153/6/591">Free online</a>

OtherRef
Bernard M; Bolognini M; Plancherel B; Chinet L; Laget J; Stephan P; Halfon O. French validity of two substance-use screening tests among adolescents: A comparison of the CRAFFT and DEP-ADO. Journal of Substance Use 2005 Dec;10(6):385-395.
Knight JR; Sherrit L; Shrier LA; Harris SK; Gates EC; Chang G. Validity of a brief alcohol screening test among adolescents: A comparison of the AUDIT, POSIT, CAGE, and the CRAFFT. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2003;27:67-73.
Knight JR; Sherrit L; Shrier LA; Harris SK; Chang G. Validity of the CRAFFT substance abuse screening test among adolescent clinic patients. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2002;156:607-614.
Cummins L; Huang C; Karen K; Burns KM; Blume AW; Larimer ME; et al. s Validity of the CRAFFT in American-Indian and Alaska-Native adolescents: Screening for drug and alcohol risk. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2003;64:727-732.

Resources
Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research's CRAFFT page <a href="http://www.ceasar-boston.org/CRAFFT/index.php">http://www.ceasar-boston.org/CRAFFT/index.php</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CRAFFT%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: CRAFFT</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20197%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">RAFFT</a>
Drug and Alcohol Problem Quickscreen (DAP)
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20188%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Problem-Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT)</a>

SourceInfo
Source reference

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM, NS

EntryDate
200512

Year
1999

InstURLHost
Wikipedia CRAFFT entry

AdminScoring
The subject provides simple yes or no answers to the 6 items. The test takes about 3 minutes to complete and can be administered as an interview or a self-report. Each positive answer to an item counts as 1 point. The "optimal" cut-off score for identifying substance use, abuse and dependence has been set at 2. Others have found that a cut-off score or 3 is optimal for identifying substances other than alcohol or cannabis.

ValidRely
The test had good internal consistency, indicating that each item is clinically useful for detecting problems with AOD. The sensitivity and specificity rates were high among subjects who had used AOD.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
American Indian/Alaska Native

MatrixRecd
Bukstein article

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CRAFFT_inst




AccessNo
347

Name
Dépistage de Consommation Problématique d’Alcool

Acronym
DEP-ADO

Developer
Guyon, L.
Landry, M.

Description
This instrument was developed in French by Canadian researchers and thus is easy to use with French-speaking patients. It is a screening instrument designed to evaluate the problem use of alcohol and other substances among young people. It was specifically designed for field workers and attempts to estimate the actual frequency of the use of the various substances. It was strongly inspired by the Indice de Gravite d'une Toxicomanie (IGT-ADO) scale (substance use seriousness score). It is made up of 8 questions; the subject provides yes or no answers, except for questions 1 and 8 for which the frequency during the last 12 months is asked.

Availability
RISQ is the creator and owner of the DEP-ADO and holds exclusive rights to it. Persons and organizations wishing to employ the questionnaire may photocopy it and use it for free, on the condition that the questionnaire (and appendices) must remain intact, and that the source is indicated. It is available in French and English. Detailed administration and coding/scoring instructions, as well as a copy of the scale itself (in both languages), can be found at the Recherche et intervention sur les substances psychoactives (RISQ) - Québec web site: <a href="http://bit.ly/DEP-ADO">http://bit.ly/DEP-ADO</a>.

A copy in French can be found on the EMCDAA Evaluation Instruments Bank: <a href="http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/html.cfm/index4366EN.html">http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/html.cfm/index4366EN.html</a>

Contact
France Fortin, secrétaire<br>
Recherche et intervention sur les Substances Psychoactives - Québec (RISQ / CIRASST)<br>
950, rue de Louvain Est<br>
Montréal QC H2M 2E8<br>
tel: 514-385-3490 #1133<br>
<a href="mailto:france.fortin@ssss.gouv.qc.ca">france.fortin@ssss.gouv.qc.ca</a>

InstURL
http://bit.ly/DEP-ADO

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Articles\Depistage de Consommation Problematique d Alcool 347.pdf
[English version, downloaded from RISQ site]

SourceRef
Guyon L; Landry M. Histoire d'un outil de depistage attendu: La DEP-ADO. Actions Tox 2001;1:5-6.

OtherRef
Bernard M; Bolognini M; Plancherel B; Chinet L; Laget J; Stephan P; Halfon O. French validity of two substance-use screening tests among adolescents: A comparison of the CRAFFT and DEP-ADO. J Substance Use 2005 Dec;10(6):385-395.
Brunnelle N; Landry M; Guyon L; Tremblay J; Bergeron J; Desjardins L. Le depistage de la consommation problematique ches les adolescents: Pourquoi une nouvelle version de la DEP-ADO? L'intervemant 2004;20(4):4-5.
Landry M; Tremblay J; Guyon L; Bergeron J; Brunelle N. La Grille de depistage de la consommation problematique d'alcool et de drogues chez les adolescents et les adolescentes (DEP-ADO): Developpement et qualites psychometriques. Droguez, sante et Societe 2004;3(1): <a href="http://www.drogues-sante-societe.org">http://www.drogues-sante-societe.org</a>

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DEP-ADO%20/%20Dépistage+de+Consommation+Problématique+d+Alcool%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Dépistage de Consommation Problématique d’Alcool (DEP-ADO)</a>

SourceInfo
EIB
Other ref (Bernard M., 2005)
RISQ document: http://www.risq-cirasst.umontreal.ca/PDF/DEP-ADO_explanatory%20Notes%20DepAdo_V3.1_oct05.pdf

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200512

Year
2001

InstURLHost
Recherche et intervention sur les substances psychoactives - Québec (RISQ) site

Notes
Updated by MB, 8/9/2006

AdminScoring
The DEP-ADO is administered in a one-to-one interview, with the interviewer noting answers directly on the sheet in the spaces indicated. The test can be completed in 5-10 minutes. Scores are obtained from a scoring grid established according to the potential seriousness of the substance use. A score of 13 or less indicates no obvious problem ("green light"), between 14 and 19 means a problem is developing ("yellow light"), and a score of 20 or more indicates an obvious problem ("red light"). Though the DEP-ADO is designed as an interview instrument, it can be used as a self-report as long as the interviewer is present to answer questions.

ValidRely
Multiple studies have supported the validity and reliability of this measure.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DEP-ADO_inst




AccessNo
356

Name
Behaviors and Experiences Inventory

Acronym
BEI

Developer
Hoffmann, Norman G.
Mee-Lee, David
Shulman, Gerald D.

Description
The BEI is a structured set of 50 questions designed to elicit information about behaviors and experiences before the age of 15 and after the age of 18. The questions cover reading issues, a history of sexual, physical, and emotional victimization, and indications of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Conduct Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD). <p>

The BEI is intended for use in the evaluation of individuals where behavioral problems and a history of victimization may be likely. It was designed for use with who are being evaluated for clinical services after having been arrested or upon release from correctional facilities. It is not a comprehensive assessment for these conditions and experiences, but is intended as a screening tool to alert clinicians to issues in these areas.

Availability
The BEI has been copyrighted by Norman G. Hoffmann, Ph.D. and may not be adapted or photocopied. It can be ordered from <a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">The Change Companies</a> in packets of 25 forms for $52.50 (the manual is an additional $15).

Contact
The Change Companies<br>
5221 Sigstrom Dr.<br>
Carson City, NV 89706<br>
tel: 888-889-8866<br>
<a href="mailto:info@changecompanies.net">info@changecompanies.net</a><br>
<a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">http://www.changecompanies.net</a>

SourceRef
Hoffmann NG ; Mee-Lee D ; Shulman GD. BEI (Behavioral and Experiences Inventory) Manual. Smithfield, RI: Evince Clinical Assessments, 1998.

Resources
<a href="http://evinceassessment.com/product_bei.html">Evince Clinical Assessments: BEI</a>

SourceInfo
Evince Assessments web site

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening
Psychological assessment

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200601

Year
1998

AdminScoring
The BEI is intended to be used orally, with the clinician or assistant reading the questions and recording the responses. In interview format, it should take approximately 15-20 minutes to administer. The BEI can also be used as a pencil-and-paper inventory, however, the clinician should make sure that the respondent can read and understand the questions. Dyslexia and other reading difficulties are common among individuals with ADHD and ASPD. Written administration of the BEI may be somewhat shorter if the respondent’s reading skills are good. <p>
The BEI can be scored and interpreted in a matter of minutes. A scoring template provides a means of organizing and recording the findings of the BEI so as to facilitate interpretation by a clinician with expertise in the diagnosis of the conditions in question. Other professionals can use the BEI in making referrals when sufficient indications of a problem exist.

ValidRely
Internal consistency reliabilities for the scales in BEI range from just over .70 to approximately .85. The scale for ADHD has a coefficient of .74 and the six-item subscale for inattention has a coefficient of .72, which is high for such a short scale. The coefficients for conduct disorder and ASPD are .84 and .74 respectively.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BEI_inst




AccessNo
358

Name
Triage Assessment of Psychiatric Disorders

Acronym
TAPD

Developer
Hoffmann, Norman G.

Description
The TAPD is a brief structured interview that provides triage information for nine Axis I and five Axis II diagnostic categories. The TAPD is presented as a triage instrument rather than simply a screen because it is explicitly based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria and typically will provide evidence for one of three conclusions: 1) information elicited by the TAPD may be sufficient to support a DSM-IV diagnosis with minimal additional inquiry or clarification; 2) problems are suggested, but a more comprehensive evaluation will be required to support or rule out a diagnosis; or 3) the negative responses to the TAPD make a diagnosis for a given condition very unlikely. <p>
The TAPD is appropriate for screening clients in a variety of clinical settings. The breadth of conditions covered make it a useful instrument for initial inquiries in mental health facilities, substance abuse programs, EAP offices, and primary health care settings. <p>
A brief inquiry to identify potential problem areas can greatly assist in confirming assessments and facilitating treatment planning. The TAPD also helps clinicians document that they conducted a reasonable inquiry over a sufficient domain of problem areas. This is particularly useful where the results are negative due to the respondent’s deliberate falsification or underreporting. In such cases, the clinician can document that the attempt was made to identify prevalent conditions.

Availability
The TAPD is copyrighted by Norman G. Hoffmann and may not be adapted or photocopied. The TAPD can be purchased in packets of 25 forms, and an administration/scoring guide is also available.

Contact
The Change Companies<br>
5221 Sigstrom Dr.<br>
Carson City, NV 89706<br>
tel: 888-889-8866<br>
<a href="mailto:info@changecompanies.net">info@changecompanies.net</a><br>
<a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">http://www.changecompanies.net</a>

Resources
<a href="http://evinceassessment.com/product_tapd.html">Evince Clinical Assessments: TAPD</a>

SourceInfo
Evince Assessments web site

InstrumentType
Screening
Treatment planning
Clinician-administered interview
Psychological assessment

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200601

AdminScoring
The TAPD is designed such that, in many of the diagnostic categories, several general screening questions are used with branching instructions to skip questions in areas when it is improbable that the individual will meet diagnostic criteria for a given disorder. For example, if an individual denies periods of depressed mood and/or diminished interest or pleasure in activities, criteria for a major depressive episode will not be met according to DSM-IV criteria. <p>
The TAPD can be administered in about 15-20 minutes by a clinician or an appropriately trained staff person with good interviewing skills. It is also possible to establish local or clinic decision rules for referral to further evaluation based on the TAPD responses. Because the TAPD findings should be interpreted in the context of the DSM-IV, only an appropriately trained clinician should be given this responsibility. Although a technician or other interviewer can administer the TAPD and record responses, many experienced clinicians will administer the interview as part of their initial assessment. This allows them to focus further assessments and avoid spending time on areas that are unlikely to require attention. In such cases, the TAPD data are simply integrated into a more general summary of findings.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TAPD_inst




AccessNo
359

Name
Employee Wellness Evaluation

Acronym
EWE

Developer
Hoffmann, Norman G.

Description
The EWE is a general screen for some of the more common behavioral and emotional problems. It also serves to identify some job-related issues. The EWE contains scales to assess risk for alcohol abuse, depression, excess stress, suppressed anger, dissatisfaction with management/supervisors, family-job stress/conflict, poor morale, or dissatisfaction with life in general.<p>
The EWE is normed on employee populations and identifies those whose responses place them in the upper ranges of problems as compared to other employees. The screen can be used in Employee Assistance or other human resources applications to screen and provide feedback to individuals or to estimate the relative prevalence of problems in a given workforce.

Availability
The EWE has been copyrighted by Norman G. Hoffmann, Ph.D. and may not be adapted or photocopied. It can be ordered from <a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">The Change Companies</a> in packets of 25 forms for $52.50 (the manual is an additional $15). Evince Clinical Assessments provides consultation and evaluation services based on the EWE. Standard evaluation services include analyses of data generated by the EWE and related information, production of a formal report, and consultation with EAP staff and/or management. These services are available to EAP’s in private sector organizations as well as government agencies.

Contact
The Change Companies<br>
5221 Sigstrom Dr.<br>
Carson City, NV 89706<br>
tel: 888-889-8866<br>
<a href="mailto:info@changecompanies.net">info@changecompanies.net</a><br>
<a href="http://www.changecompanies.net">http://www.changecompanies.net</a>

SourceRef
Hoffmann NG. EWE: Employee Wellness Evaluation Manual. Smithfield, RI: Evince Clinical Assessments, 1995.

OtherRef
Hoffmann NG ; Johnson D. Enhancing detective of hidden problems with a routine screen. Presentation given at the 30th EAPA Annual Conference, Vancouver, BC, October 2001.

Resources
<a href="http://evinceassessment.com/product_ewe.html">Evince Clinical Assessments: EWE</a>

SourceInfo
Evince Assessments web site

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200601

Year
1995

AdminScoring
About 10 to 15 minutes must be allowed for the respondent to answer the items as a pencil-and-paper questionnaire. Scoring is a clerical task requiring 2 to 5 minutes. Though the EWE can be scored by any staff person, feedback to individuals, interpretation of the findings, or other clinical uses should be conducted only by a qualified, licensed professional. The manual and supporting materials for the EWE provide instructions for use, normative information, and statistical summaries on employees and their dependents.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/EWE_inst




AccessNo
364

Name
Substance Use Inventory

Acronym
SUI

Developer
Weiss, Roger D.
Hufford, Cathryn
Najavits, Lisa M.
Shaw, Sarah R.

Description
This brief measure asks detailed questions regarding participants' use and administration route of a variety of substances in the previous seven days, including alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana, along with shorter sections about sedatives, PCP, stimulants, and hallucinogens. Respondents are asked how many times in the past seven days each substance was used and what the administration route was (smoked, oral, injected, e.g.), as well as the average dollar amount of each drug used each day and the maximum dollar value of each drug used in a single day. The scale ends with a few questions about craving and urges to use. This scale can be used for baseline and follow-up assessments, as well as for treatment phase assessments.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Roger D. Weiss, MD<br>
<a href="mailto:rweiss@mclean.harvard.edu">rweiss@mclean.harvard.edu</a>

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Substance_Use_Inventory_364.pdf
[formatted for SDS]

SourceRef
Weiss RD ; Hufford C ; Najavits LM ; Shaw SR. Weekly Substance Use Inventory. Unpublished measure, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 1995.

OtherRef
Najavits LM ; Weiss RD ; Shaw SR ; Muenz LR. "Seeking Safety": Outcome of a new cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for women with posttraumatic stress disorder and substance dependence. Journal of Traumatic Stress 1998;11(3):437-456.
Reback CJ ; Larkins S ; Shoptaw S. Changes in the meaning of sexual risk behaviors among gay and bisexual male methamphetamine abusers before and after drug treatment. AIDS and Behavior 2004;8(1): 87-98.
Ballenger JF; Best SR; Metzler TJ; Wasserman DA; Mohr DC; Liberman A; Delucchi K; Weiss DS; Fagan JA; Waldrop AE; Marmar CR. Patterns and predictors of alcohol use in male and female urban police officers. American Journal on Addictions 2011;20(1):21-29.

SourceInfo
Other references and a copy of SDS's PDF.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200602

Year
1995

Notes
A revised version of this instrument was referenced in a NIDA Blending presentation (http://www.mac1988.com/blendingcolorado/ppts/Hien.pdf), but I couldn't find anything else on the web about it. Najavits was also referenced in that presentation, so I'm sure it was the same instrument. [MB, 2006]
Recommended by ADAI-SDS

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SUI_inst




AccessNo
376

Name
Research Institute on Addictions Self-Inventory

Acronym
RIASI

Developer
Nochajski, Thomas H.

Description
The RIASI is a 49-item instrument developed as a brief screen to identify individuals who might require a more thorough diagnostic assessment for an alcohol-use disorder and as a potential predictor of subsequent DUI recidivism. It consists of 41 true-false items and 8 items in which the respondent fills in the frequency or quantity of certain behaviors or events. The RIASI represents a careful and empirical development of a screening device for use with the DWI population. Developed specifically for the New York State Drinking Driver Programs, it is now being used in several states. As with the MAC, the RIASI is designed to screen for alcoholism using "covert content items," i.e., items which do not directly mention drinking. 31 items are distal measures, meaning the person cannot readily determine how to fake good or bad in response to the question, also these questions address issues of hostility, sensationseeking, depression and other personality characteristics linked to DWI.

Availability
There is no fee for use of this instrument. A copy of the instrument is
available from Thomas H. Nochajski, Ph.D.

Contact
Thomas H. Nochajski, Ph.D<br>
Senior Research Scientist<br>
Center for Health and Social Research<br>
Associate Professor<br>
School of Social Work, SUNY Buffalo<br>
660 Baldy Hall</br>
Amherst, New York 14260<br>

tel: 716-654-3381<br>
<a href="mailto:nochajth@buffalostate.edu">nochajth@buffalostate.edu</a> or <a href="mailto:thn@buffalo.edu">thn@buffalo.edu</a>

ADAI
Dennis must have a copy -- cited in an RSA poster 2005.

SourceRef
Nochajski, T.H. & Miller, B.A. (1995). Training Manual for the Research Institute on Addictions Self-Inventory (RIASI). Buffalo, NY: Research Institute on Addictions.

OtherRef
Nochjaski TH, Miller BA, Augustino DK, Kramer R. Use of non-obvious indicators for screening DWI offenders. In: Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety - T'95. Kloeden CN, McLean AJ (eds.) Adelaide, Australia: NHMRC Road Accident Research Unit, University of Adelaide, 1995, p. 449-454. <a href="http://casr.adelaide.edu.au/T95/paper/s17p3.html">http://casr.adelaide.edu.au/T95/paper/s17p3.html</a>
Nochajski TH, Wieczorek WF. Identifying potential drinking-driving recidivists: Do non-obvious indicators help? Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community 1:69-83, 1998.
Shuggi R, Mann RE, Zalcman RF, Chipperfield B, Nochajski TH. Predictive validity of the RIASI: Alcohol and drug use and problems six months following remedial program participation. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 32:121-133, 2006.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RIASI%20/%20Research+Institute+on+Addictions+Self+Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Research Institute on Addictions Self-Inventory (RIASI)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200602

Year
1995

AdminScoring
The RIASI can be completed and scored in 15 minutes.

ValidRely
"The RIASI represents a careful and empirical development of a screening device for use with a particular population. Developed specifically for the New York State Drinking Driver Programs, it is now being used in several state(s)..." (NIAAA, Assessing Alcohol Problems, 2003, p. 33-34.)

Status
public

Population
DUI/DWI drivers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RIASI_inst




AccessNo
379

Name
Reduce Annoyed Guilty Start

Acronym
RAGS

Developer
Sobell, Linda C.
Sobell, Mark B.
Levin, C.
Cleland, P. A.
Ellingstad, T.
Toll, Benjamin A.

Description
The Reduce Annoyed Guilty Start test was developed by Sobell and Sobell (1999) as a drug specific counterpart to the CAGE. The RAGS contains four questions, is self-administered, and specifically asks about lifetime drug use. The RAGS questions are: (a) Have you ever felt you should Reduce or stop your drug use? (b) Have people ever Annoyed you by criticizing your use of drugs? (c) Have you ever felt Guilty aobut using drugs? and (d) Have you ever needed drugs to Start your daily activities.

Availability
The four items of the RAGS are listed in the Description field above. A Spanish language version of the RAGS is available in the Bedregal 2006 reference.

ADAI
Questions are listed in the "Description" field above.

SourceRef
Levin C ; Sobell L ; Cleland P. ; Ellingstad T ; Sobell M ; Toll B ; et al. (1999). RAGS: A new brief drug abuse screening instrument. Poster session presented at the annual convention of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy.

OtherRef
Bedregal LE ; Sobell LC ; Sobell MB ; Simco E. Psychometric characteristics of a Spanish version of the DAST-10 and the RAGS. Addictive Behaviors 2006 Feb;31(2):309-319.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RAGS%20/%20Reduce+Annoyed+Guilty+Start%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Reduce Annoyed Guilty Start (RAGS)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2058%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CAGE</a>

SourceInfo
Other ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
pm

EntryDate
200602

Year
1999

ValidRely
The RAGS exhibits good internal consistency (coefficient alpha=0.78) and excellent test-retest reliability (r=0.64). In addition, a discriminant function analysis demonstrated that the RAGS was highly sensitive and specific to drug abusers compared to college students with no alcohol and/or drug problem and alcohol abusers. The Spanish version of the RAGS has also demonstrated good psychometric properties. For more detailed psychometric information, see the references above.

Status
public

Population
College students
Hispanics

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RAGS_inst




AccessNo
383

Name
Symptom Checklist-90-Revised

Acronym
SCL-90-R

Developer
Derogatis, Leonard R.

Description
The SCL-90-R is a 90-item, brief, multidimensional checklist designed to assess psychopathology and psychological distress. It measures 9 primary symptom dimensions and intensities: somatisation, obsessive compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism, PLUS Global Severity Index, positive symptom distress index, and positive symptom total. The SCL-90-R has been employed in many studies to measure therapeutic change during treatment and is recommended as a standard instrument for psychotherapy outcome research. It can also be used as a screening instrument for comorbidity. Norms are provided for four groups: non-patient adult, non-patient adolescent, psychiatric outpatient, and psychiatric inpatient.

Availability
This scale is available from Pearson Assessments: <a href="http://pearsonassessments.com/catalog/scl90r.pdf">http://pearsonassessments.com/catalog/scl90r.pdf</a>. A starter kit (for hand scoring), which includes the manual, 50 answer sheets with test items, 50 profile forms, 2 worksheets, and answer keys, is available for each of the four normed populations (nonpatient adults, nonpatient adolescents, e.g.). Each kit is $100. The SCL-90-R can also be scored by computer using Q Local Software. Details on this service, as well as a mail-in scoring service, are available at Pearson Assessments.<p>
The SCL-90-R is available in English, Spanish, and French.

Contact
Pearson Assessments<br>
<a href="http://pearsonassessments.com/">http://pearsonassessments.com/</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Symptoms Checklist SCL-90-R 383.pdf
Print copy in instrument binder.

SourceRef
Derogatis LR. SCL-90-R, Administration, Scoring, and Procedures Manual 1. Baltimore, Clinical Psychometric Research, 1977.

OtherRef
Deady M. A Review of Screening, Assessment and Outcome Measures for Drug and Alcohol Settings. NSW Health Department, 2009, 225p. Free online: <a href="http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf">http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf</a>.
Martinez S; Stillerman L; Waldo M. Reliability and validity of the SCL-90-R with Hispanic college Students. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 2005;27(2):254-264.
Sander W ; Jux M. Psychological distress in alcohol-dependent patients; evaluating inpatient treatment with the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R). European Addiction Research 2006;12:61-66.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SCL+90%20/%20Symptom+Checklist%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Symptom Checklist (SCL-90)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2055%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20214%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">SCL-20 Hopkins Symptom Checklist Depression Scale</a>

SourceInfo
Other refs, Pearson Assessments site.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Assessment
Screening

Recommended
CAMH

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200603

Year
1977

AdminScoring
The SCL-90-R contains 90 items and can be completed in just 12-15 minutes. It can then be hand-scored, computer-scored, or scored via a mail-in service provided by Pearson Assessments. The SCL-90-R may be hand or computer scored.

ValidRely
This instrument has demonstrated internal consistency coefficient alphas for the nine symptom dimensions ranged from .77 for psychoticism to a high of .90 for depression. Test-retest reliability coefficients range between .80 and .90 after one week of therapy. Validity studies of the SCL-90-R have demonstrated levels of concurrent, convergent, discriminant, and construct validity comparable to other self-report inventories.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
Co-occurring clients
Hispanics

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SCL-90-R_inst




AccessNo
392

Name
Drug Attitude Scale

Acronym
DAS

Developer
Campbell, Stephen N.

Description
This scale is used to measure personal attitudes and behaviors associated with substance use and misuse. It has been utilized in a number of clinical settings as a screening insturment. The scale was developed from 45 questions presumed to be attitudinal in content that were collected to represent a wide variety of areas that are affected by drug use and alcohol misuse. The final scale has 25 questions, and provides an effective means of finding individuals in the population who have poor attitudes toward drugs and alcohol (i.e., refuses to acknowledge the dangers of illicit drugs). The scale is designed for use with English-speaking and English-reading individuals of either sex, ages 12 and over.

Availability
A copy of the scale is available in the Campbell 2006 reference above (Appendix A).

Contact
Stephen N. Campbell

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Drug Attitude Scale 392.pdf
[from Campbell, Chang, 2006 ref -- is also the "Subst Abuse Attitude
Scale"?]

SourceRef
Campbell S., Siroki S. (1989) Assessment, Treatment and Intervention for Dual Diagnosis. Presented at the 14th Annual Conference of the Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services, Miami, FL June 30, 1989.

OtherRef
Campbell S, Chang A. Reliablilty testing and validation of the Drug Attitude Scale. Substance Use & Misuse 2006;41(5):763-770.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DAS%20/%20Drug+Attitude+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug Attitude Scale (DAS)</a>

SourceInfo
Other ref (Campbell, 2006)

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200605

Year
1989

AdminScoring
The DAS takes 5-8 minutes to complete. Items are rated on a Likert scale of 1-5.

ValidRely
Initial testing of the DAS suggests that this scale represents a useful addition to the areas of substance user assessment and rehabilitation. Reliability coefficients were moderately high for all subgroups as well as the entire sample. Factor loading demonstrated that the scale items correlate around the dimension it is designed to assess and that the scoring key is accurate.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DAS_inst




AccessNo
404

Name
Inwald Survey 2 - Adolescent Version

Acronym
IS2-A

Developer
Inwald, Robin E.

Description
The Inwald Survey 2 (IS2) is used to aid in the identification of adolescents who tend to disregard rules and/or societal norms. It focuses on characteristics that have been associated with antisocial/violent behavior patterns. The IS2-A contains 119 true-false items, using thirteen subscales: Denial of Shortcomings (Validity Scale), Risk-Taking Tendencies, Lack of Temper Control, Safety Patterns, Firearms Interest, Disciplinary Difficulties, Lack of Social Sensitivity, Lack of Responsibility, Lack of Leadership Interest, Unlawful Behavior, Lack of Adult Protector, Alcohol Use, and Drug Use.

Availability
This scale is available from Hilson Research, Inc., which also offers web-based versions of the test for easy administration and scoring.

Contact
Robin E. Inwald, Ph.D.<br>
Hilson Research, Inc.<br>
P.O. Box 150239<br>
82-28 Abingdon Road<br>
Kew Gardens, NY 11415<br>
tel: 800-926-2258<br>
<a href="http://www.hilsonresearch.com/">http://www.hilsonresearch.com/</a>

OtherRef
Inwald RE; Resko JA. Preemployment screening for public safety personnel. IN: VandeCreek L; Knapp S; Jackson TL (eds). Innovations in Clinical Practice: A Source Book, Vol. 14. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press/Professional Resource Exchange, Inc., 1995, pp. 365-382.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20131%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Hilson Adolescent Profile (HAP)</a>

SourceInfo
TIP 31

InstrumentType
Screening

Recommended
TIP 31

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200607

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IS2-A_inst




AccessNo
407

Name
Patient Health Questionnaire

Acronym
PHQ

Developer
Spitzer, Robert L.
Williams, Janet B.W.
Kroenke, Kurt

Description
The Patient Health Questionnaire is a self-report version of the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), which was designed by Spitzer et al for the screening of psychiatric disorders in an adult primary practice setting. The PHQ comprises the two components of the original PRIME-MD, the patient questionnaire and clinician evaluation guide, combined into a single, three-page questionnaire that can be entirely self-administered by the patient. A four page for women has also been added that includes questions about menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and recent psychosocial stressors. Users have the choice of using the entire four-page instrument, just the three page diagnostic portion, a two-page version (Brief PHQ) that covers mood and panic disorders and nondiagnostic information (menstruation, pregnancy questions, e.g.), or only the first page of the two page version (covering only the mood and panic disorders).
<p>Another version of the PHQ, the PHQ-9, is a depression module that scores each of the 9 DSM-IV criteria for depression. The original PRIME-MD assessed 18 current mental disorders. By grouping several specific mood, anxiety, and somatoform categories into larger rubrics, the PHQ greatly simplifies the differential diagnosis by assessing only 8 disorders.
<p>A 2-item screener, the PHQ-2 inquires about the frequency of depressed mood and anhedonia over the past 2 weeks, scoring each as 0 (not at all) to 3 (nearly every day). (Kroenke K et al, 2003).

Availability
The PHQ and PHQ-9 (in English and Spanish) are available from the Georgetown University's Center for Trauma and the Community (CTC): <a href="http://ctc.georgetown.edu/toolkit/">http://ctc.georgetown.edu/toolkit/</a>.
<p>The PHC-2 is available from the <a href="http://brightfutures.aap.org/pdfs/Developmental%20Assessment%204/PHQ-2%20Instructions%20for%20Use.pdf">American Academy of Pediatrics Bright Futures.</a>

Contact
Georgetown Center for Trauma and the Community<br>
<a href="http://ctc.georgetown.edu/"http://ctc.georgetown.edu/</a>

InstURL
http://ctc.georgetown.edu/toolkit/

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Patient Health Questionnaire 407.pdf
[from Georgetown site; full version (converted doc to pdf)]
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Patient Health Questionnaire 9 item 407.pdf [from Georgetown site; the 9-item English version]

SourceRef
Spitzer RL; Kroenke K; Williams JB. Validation and utility of a self-report version of PRIME-MD: the PHQ primary care study. Primary care evaluation of mental disorders. Patient Health Questionnaire. JAMA 1999;282:1737-1744. (<a href="http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/282/18/1737">free online</a>)

OtherRef
Spitzer RL; Williams JB; Kroenke K; Hornyak R; McMurray J. Validity and utility of the PRIME-MD patient health questionnaire in assessment of 3000 obstetric-gynecologic patients: the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire Obstetrics-Gynecology Study. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2002;183:759-769.
Kroenke K; Spitzer RL; Williams JB. The PHQ-9: Validity of a brief depression severity measure. Journal of General Internal Medicine 2001;16:606-613.
Kroenke K; Spitzer RL; Williams JB. The Patient Health Questionnaire-2: Validity of a two-item depression screener. Medical Care 2003;41:1284-1292.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20186%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB, NS

EntryDate
200607

Year
1997

InstURLHost
Georgetown CTC (see "Assessment Instruments")

AdminScoring
The physician time required to review the PHQ is typically less than five minutes (the clinician-administered PRIME-MD takes significantly more time to administer). After administering the PHQ, the clinician scans the completed questionnaire, verifies positive responses, and then applies diagnostic algorithms that are abbreviated at the bottom of each page. The data can also be entered into a computer program that applies the algorithms instead.

ValidRely
The self-administered PHQ has diagnostic validity comparable to that of the original clinician-administered PRIME-MD. This was demonstrated both by agreement with an independent MHP interview (criterion validity) as well as by the strong association of PHQ diagnoses with indices of functional impairment and health care use (construct validity). Additional psychometric information can be found in the source reference.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PHQ_inst




AccessNo
409

Name
Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Parents

Acronym
POSIP

Developer
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Rahdert, Elizabeth H.

Description
The POSIP was designed to identify potential problem areas that require further in-depth assessment. The questionnaire items were derived from POSIT questionnaire items in the following areas: Substance use and abuse (17 items), Mental health (22 items), Family relations (11 items), Peer relations (10 items), Aggressive behavior/delinquency (16 items). Differences in the specific problem areas indicate differences in perception of and/or reporting on those problem areas between the parent/guardian and adolescent, or between two parents/guardians who are filling out the questionnaire together. The POSIP is not a diagnostic instrument and additional tests are required for full assessment. As a brief problem screen, the POSIP can be used in a wide variety of settings, including inpatient and outpatient programs, various case management systems and with special populations. It can be used by staff from schools, juvenile justice systems, and mental health and drug treatment programs to gather case-level data for clinical decisions and/or aggregate data for needs-assessment surveys. The POSIP is designed for use with the POSIT amd POSIT Follow-up screening instruments. The POSIP consists of 75 yes/no items and can be completed in 15-20 minutes.

Availability
POSIP is not copyrighted and is free-of-charge. Persons wanting to use the POSIP can use it. The only request in that Elizabeth Rahdert and the National Institute on Drug Abuse are acknowledged in written materials. The POSIP is available in English and Spanish.

Contact
Elizabeth Rahdert, Ph.D.<br>
Division of Clinical and Services Research<br>
National Institute on Drug Abuse<br>
National Institutes of Health Room 4229<br>
6001 Executive Boulevard<br>
Bethesda, Maryland, 20892-9563<br>
tel: 301-443-0107<br>
<a href="mailto:Elizabeth_Rahdert@nih.gov">Elizabeth_Rahdert@nih.gov</a>

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Problem_Oriented_Screening_Instrument_for_Parents_409.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Problem_Oriented_Screening_Instrument_for_Parents_409.pdf

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20188%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT)</a>

SourceInfo
EIB

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200607

Year
1991

InstURLHost
ADAI

AdminScoring
The POSIP consists of 75 yes/no items and can be completed in 15-20 minutes. No special training is required to administer the POSIP.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/POSIP_inst




AccessNo
415

Name
Counselor Compassion Fatigue Scale

Acronym
CCFS

Developer
Fisher, Silvia Kay
Fisher, Ronnie

Description
The CCFS contains 20 items designed to assess compassion fatigue in counselors, which is associated with counselors who have achieved an unpleasant level of exhaustion, frustration, and fatigue due to the multiple stressors associated with the profession of counseling. The CCFS is a Likert scale with five (N=5) rating categories, indicating the degree to which each statement is true for the counselor. Total scores range from 20 to 100, with higher scores indicating that the counselor may have a higher degree of “compassion fatigue.” All 20 CCFS items are scaled in the same direction to simplify the counselor’s ability to rate him/herself on each statement. Although the CCFS can be administered on paper and pencil, personally during an interview, or over the telephone, some counselors may prefer to complete this instrument privately.

<p>Information generated from counselors’ feedback using the CCFS can be used to plan appropriate interventions to improve counselors’ coping skills or to facilitate value clarification. The CCFS is intended only to provide supplemental information that may be used in practice. No clinical decisions should be made on the basis of the CCFS or any other single instrument

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of this scale is available in the source reference (Fisher & Fisher, 2006).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Counselor Compassion Fatigue Scale 415.pdf

SourceRef
Fisher SK; Fisher R. Assessment tools: Counselor Compassion Fatigue Scale (CCFS). Counselor 2006;7(1):40.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CCFS%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Counselor Compassion Fatigue Scale (CCFS)</a>

SourceInfo
Counselor site, source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200607

Year
2006

Status
public

Population
Counselors

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CCFS_inst




AccessNo
416

Name
Addiction Disorder Screen-7

Acronym
ADS-7

Developer
Howatt WA

Description
The Addictive Disorders Screen–7 (ADS-7) is an addictive disorder screening tool to predict potential risk for seven addictive disorders: chemical dependency (drugs),chemical dependency (alcohol), compulsive buying (or shopping addiction), compulsive gambling, eating disorders, workaholism, and sex addictions. The ADS-7 has been designed to assess new clients’ potential risk. This addictive disorder-screening tool is for assessing risk in the assessment process; it is not a diagnostic tool.
<p>
The ADS-7 has 49 questions, which are to be answered with regard to behavior over the past six months, including today. The ADS-7 takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

Availability
Copyright 2005. This instrument was developed for public domain use. ADAI does not have a copy of this scale or any contact information for the developer.

ADAI
[see source ref]

SourceRef
Howatt WA. Addiction screening tools vs. addiction clinical measures: Introducing the Addiction Disorder Screen (ADS)-7. Counselor 2006;7(1):48-53.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20ADS+7%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Addiction Disorder Screen-7 (ADS-7)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200608

Year
2005

AdminScoring
Scoring is as follows for each question: 0 Never; 1 Once; 2 Fewer than three times; 3 Fewer than six times; 4 More than seven times. The client’s scores indicate potential risk in certain addictive disorders. The scoring grid helps establish potential risk levels and where further investigation may be warranted.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ADS-7_inst




AccessNo
418

Name
Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence - Smokeless Tobacco

Acronym
FTND-ST

Developer
Ebbert, Jon O.
Patten, Christi A.
Schroeder, Darrell R.

Description
This scale, a modified version of the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND or FTQ), was designed to measure nicotine dependence in smokeless tobacco users. Though the FTND for cigarette smokers requires a cigarette brand nicotine content rating, this information is scarce or non-existant for most smokeless tobacco brands. Eliminating this rating in the FTND-ST was an important step forward in finding the best way to assess nicotine dependence in smokeless tobacco users. <p>
The FTND-ST has six items, including: "How soon after you wake up do you place your first dip?," "How often do you intentionally swallow tobacco juice?", "How many cans/pouches per week do you use?", and "Do you chew if you are so ill that you are in bed most of the day?"

Availability
A copy of the scale items can be found in Table 1 of the source reference.

Contact
Jon O. Ebbert<br>
Nicotine Research Program<br>
Primary Care Internal Medicine<br>
Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic<br>
200 1st St. SW<br>
Rochester, MN 55905<br>
<a href="mailto:ebbert.jon@mayo.edu">ebbert.jon@mayo.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence Smokeless Tobacco 418.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Ebbert JO; Patten CA; Schroeder DR. The Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence - Smokeless Tobacco (FTND-ST). Addictive Behaviors 2006;31(9):1716-1721

OtherRef
Thomas JL ; Ebbert JO ; Patten CA ; Dale LC ; Bronars CA ; Schroeder DR. Measuring nicotine dependence among smokeless tobacco users. Addictive Behaviors 2006;31(9):1511-1521.
Ferketich AK; Wee AG; Shultz J; Wewers ME. A measure of nicotine dependence for smokeless tobacco users. Addict Behav 2007;32(9):1970-5.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20115%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200608

Year
2006

AdminScoring
Each item on the FTND-ST has multiple answer choices, each one assigned a specific number of points. A total score is calculated as the sum of the individual item answer point values.

ValidRely
This scale correlates well to other nicotine dependence assessment instruments. Though it has a low internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.47), this is similar to previously reported alpha coefficients of self-report scales measuring cigarette smoking dependence. However, future research is needed using larger samples of smokeless tobacco users to more fully examine the psychometric properties of the FTND-ST.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/FTND-ST_inst




AccessNo
419

Name
Alcohol Urge Questionnaire

Acronym
AUQ

Developer
Bohn, Michael J.
Krahn, Dean D.
Staehler, Beth A.

Description
The AUQ is an 8-question, self-administered measure of drinking urges. Questions are in the form of a 7-point Likert scale with participants endorsing the extent to which they agree or disagree with statements relating to desire to drink (4 items), expectation of a desired outcome from drinking (2 items), and inability to avoid drinking if alcohol was available (2 items).

Availability
The AUQ is available from the author.

Contact
Michael J. Bohn, M.D.<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
University of Wisconsin Medical Schol<br>
Madison, WI 53792-2475

InstURL
https://www.phenxtoolkit.org/index.php?pageLink=browse.protocoldetails&id=520301

SourceRef
Bohn MJ; Krahn DD; Staehler BA. Development and initial validation of a measure of drinking urges in abstinent alcoholics. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 1995;19:600-606.

OtherRef
Drobes DJ; Thomas SE. Assessing craving for alcohol. Alcohol Research & Health 1999;23(3):179-186. Available online: <a href="http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh23-3/179-186.pdf">http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh23-3/179-186.pdf</a>.
Drummond DC; Phillips TS. Alcohol urges in alcohol-dependent drinkers: Further validation of the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire in an untreated community clinical population. Addiction 2002;97(11):1465-1472.
Flannery BA; Poole SA; Gallop RJ; Volpicelli JR. Alcohol craving predicts drinking during treatment: An analysis of three assessment instruments. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2003;64(1):120-126
MacKillop J. Factor structure of the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire under neutral conditions and during a cue-elicited urge state. Alcoholism: Clinican and Experimental Research 2006;30(8):1315-1321.
Rosenberg H; Mazzola J. Relationships among self-report assessments of craving in binge-drinking university students. Addict Behav 2007;32(12):2811-8.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Descriptors%20/%20Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20AUQ%20/%20Alcohol+Urge+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Alcohol Urge Questionnaire (AUQ)</a>
<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=DetailsSearch&Term=%22Alcohol+Urge+Questionnaire%22[All+Fields]">PubMed Search: Alcohol Urge Questionnaire (AUQ)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref, other refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
TIP 28

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200608

Year
1995

InstURLHost
PhenX Toolkit (RTI International)

AdminScoring
Items are scored on a 7-point Likert scale, ranging from "strongly agree" to "strongly disagree."

ValidRely
The internal consistency of the AUQ is very high. The AUQ has high 1-day and moderate 1-week test-retest reliability among recently abstinent alcoholics and greater stability among alcoholics with more prolonged abstinence, suggesting that alcohol urges measured by the AUQ are less stable during the first few weeks of abstinence and become more stable thereafter. The AUQ also demonstrates concurrent, construct, and discriminant validity. Additional details on the psychometrics of this instrument can be found in the source reference.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AUQ_inst




AccessNo
429

Name
Missouri Alcoholism Severity Scale

Acronym
MASS

Developer
Evenson, Richard C.
Altman, Harold
Won Cho, Dong
Montgomery, Jan

Description
The MASS was created from the 157 items on the Missouri Alcoholism History Form (AHF), a research-oriented instrument used in the Missouri Division of Mental Health. In its final form, the MASS consists of 20 items, each eliciting information about core symptoms that reflect that National Council on Alcoholism criteria for the diagnosis of alcoholism. Items were chosen to indicate change so that a decrease in score over time suggest positive effect of treatment. Each item, focusing on such symptoms as hallucinations, shakes, blackouts, and need for a drink on wakening, is scored as three points. Answers to questions about quantity of drinking are scored with a variable number of points from 0 to 5. Studies have revealed a mean total score of 18.98 in alcoholics before treatment, and 6.91 after.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. ADAI does not have a copy of this scale.

SourceRef
Evenson RC; Altman H; Won Cho D; Montgomery J. Development of an alcoholism severity scale via an interative computer program for item analysis. Quart J Stud Alc 1973;34:1336-1341.

OtherRef
Evenson, Richard C; Reese, Paul J; Holland, Richard A. Measuring the severity of symptoms in outpatient alcoholics. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 1982;43(7):839-842.
Evenson RC. The Missouri Alcoholism Severity Scale: relationship with type of alcohol consumption. J Stud Alcohol 1986;47(5):381-3.
Seixas FA. The Missouri Alcoholism Severity Scale as a predictor of transfer from outpatient to inpatient treatment. Subst Alcohol Actions Misuse 1983;4(6):423-43.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Missouri+Alcoholism+Severity+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Missouri Alcoholism Severity Scale (MASS)</a>

RelatedInst
Missouri Alcohol History Form (AHF)

SourceInfo
Source ref, other refs.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200608

Year
1973

ValidRely
The MASS appears to be internally consistent and reliable over time.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MASS_inst




AccessNo
434

Name
Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale

Acronym
CES-D

Developer
Radloff, Lenore S.

Description
The CES-D is a 20-item, self-report depression scale. Items refer to the frequency of symptoms during last week. It can also be administered as a structured interview. The CES-D is a brief questionnaire that assesses the frequency and duration of the symptoms associated with depression. Studies with alcohol and drug abusers have shown the scale to be a reliable and valid measure of depressed feelings in these groups. CES-D also suitable for measuring change and improvements in depression following treatment. It has been used with both mates and females in general population surveys and in various clinical samples, including alcohol and drug abusers. The CES-D has been adapted for use with children. The scale has also been validated for use with adolescents, the elderly, and a number of different ethnic groups.<p>
As with other self-assessed depression scales, the CES-D should not be viewed as a diagnostic tool, but rather as a screening test to identify individuals or groups at risk for depression.

Availability
The original CES-D is in the public domain.

InstURL
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Center_for_Epidemiological_Studies_Depression_Scale_434.pdf

ADAI
http://adai.washington.edu/instruments/pdf/Center_for_Epidemiological_Studies_Depression_Scale_434.pdf

SourceRef
Radloff LS. The CES-D scale: A self-report depression scale for research in the general population. Applied Psychological Measurement 1977;1:385-401.

OtherRef
Schnoll RA, Leone FT, Hitsman B. Symptoms of depression and smoking behaviors following treatment with transdermal nicotine patch. J Addict Dis 2013;32:46-52. [about the use of the CES-D in predicting withdrawal, craving, and affect during nicotine withdrawal]
Grzywacz JG; Hovey JD; Seligman LD; Arcury TA; Quandt SA. Evaluating short-form versions of the CES-D for measuring depressive symptoms among immigrants from Mexico. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 2006;28(3):404-424.
McCaffery JM; Niaura R; Swan GE; Carmelli D. A study of depressive symptoms and smoking behavior in adult male twins from the NHLBI twin study. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2003;5(1):77-83.
Okun A; Stein RE; Bauman LJ; Silver EJ. Content validity of the Psychiatric Symptom Index, CES-depression Scale, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory from the perspective of DSM-IV. Psychol Rep 1996;79(3 Pt 1):1059-69.
Brink TL; Niemeyer L. Assessment of depression in college students: Geriatric Depression Scale versus Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Psychol Rep 1992;71(1):163-6.
Joseph S; Lewis CA. Factor analysis of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Psychol Rep 1996;76(1):40-42.
Rankin SH; Galbraith ME; Johnson S. Reliability and validity data for a Chinese translation of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression. Psychol Rep 1993;73(3 Pt 2):1291-8.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CES+D%20/%20Center+for+Epidemiological+Studies+Depression*%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale</a>

SourceInfo
EIB site

InstrumentType
Psychological assessment
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Clinician-administered interview

Recommended
CAMH

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200608

Year
1977

InstURLHost
ADAI

AdminScoring
Question scores are summed to provide an overall score ranging from 0 to 60. Scores of 16 or more are commonly taken as indicative of depression. No special training is necessary for the administration or scoring of this measure.

ValidRely
Multiple studies have demonstrated the strong validity and reliability of the CES-D. See Other References for details on the psychometrics.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Older adults
Adolescents
Hispanics

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CES-D_inst




AccessNo
454

Name
Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain

Acronym
SOAPP

Developer
Butler, Stephen F.
Budman, Simon H.
Fernandez, Katherine C.
Jamison, Robert N.

Description
The SOAPP is a brief, self-administered screening instrument designed to capture information that will identify chronic pain patients who may be at risk for problems with long-term opioid medication. It is available in versions with 5, 14, or 24 items, with a readability level of just over 4th grade. It can be completed by most patients without assistance in the waiting room, examination room, or prior to the health visit. The SOAPP is NOT intended to rule out/screen out chronic pain patients for opioid therapy; SOAPP data, along with other clinical findings, can help the provider determine the level of monitoring that may be necessary to safely prescribe long-term opioid therapy for a given patient.

Availability
The three versions SOAPP can be found on the website: <a href="http://www.painedu.org/soap.asp">http://www.painedu.org/soap.asp</a>, where an online training module and FAQs are also available. Registration is required but the questionnaires and other information is free. The questions in the 14-item SOAPP are also printed in Akbik et al (2006), cited above.

Contact
S.F. Butler<br>
Inflexxion, Inc.<br>
320 Needham Street, Suite 100<br>
Newton, MA 02464-1594, USA<br>
<a href="mailto:sfbutler@inflexxion.com">sfbutler@inflexxion.com</a>

InstURL
http://www.painedu.org/soap.asp

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain 1.0 SF 454.pdf
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain 1.0 14Q 454.pdf
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain 1.0 454.pdf

SourceRef
Butler SF, Budman SH, Fernandez K, Jamison RN. Validation of a screener and opioid assessment measure for patients with chronic pain. Pain, 112(1-2):65-75, 2004.

OtherRef
Akbik H, Butler SF, Budman SH, Fernandez K, Katz NP, Jamison RN. Validation and clinical application of the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain (SOAPP). Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 2006; 32(3):287-93.
Weaver M; Schnoll S. Addiction issues in prescribing opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Journal of Addiction Medicine 2007;1(1):2-10.

Resources
<a href="http://PainEDU.org">http://PainEDU.org</a>: information resource about pain for the public and clinicians.

SourceInfo
PainEDU website and source articles.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening
Treatment planning

EnteredBy
NS

EntryDate
200611

Year
2004

InstURLHost
PainEDU.org

AdminScoring
Scoring is done by adding up the ratings for each of the items in the SOAPP. For the 14- and 24-item versions, a score of 7 or above indicates that the patient may be at risk for problems, and should be monitored by the clinician if prescribed opiates for chronic pain.

ValidRely
Akbik et al (2006), found preliminary support for the internal reliability and predictive validity of the 14-item SOAPP. More information can be found at the PainEDU.org website.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SOAPP_inst




AccessNo
463

Name
Indian Health Service - Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire

Acronym
IHS-PESQ

Developer
Winters, Ken C.
DeWolf, Jerome
Graham, Donald
St. Cyr, Wehnona

Description
The Indian Health Service - Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (IHS-PESQ) is a brief questionnaire that screens for drug abuse problem severity, response distortion tendencies, and psychosocial risk factors. The IHS-PESQ is based on the original PESQ but uses two major modifications: first, peyote and mescaline were dropped from the list of hallucinogens, given their possible use as medicine in native religious ceremonies; and second, the scoring rules of the 18-item PESQ were revised so that three mutually exclusive groups could be identified: no AOD problem (green flag), mild/moderate AOD problem (yellow flag), and severe AOD problem (red flag) (the original PESQ just uses two groups: green and red).

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Ken C. Winters, PhD<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
University of Minnesota, F282/2A West<br>
2450 Riverside Ave.<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55454

SourceRef
Winters KC, DeWolf J, Graham D,St. Cyr, W. Screening American Indian youth for referral to drug abuse prevention and intervention services. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse 16(1):39-52, 2006.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20IHS-PESQ%20/%20Indian+Health+Service+Personal%20Experience%20Screening+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Indian Health Service - Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (IH-PESQ)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20178%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Personal Experience Screening Questionnaire (PESQ)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
NS, MB

EntryDate
200611

Year
2006

ValidRely
The psychometric properties of the problem severity scale were found to be favorable when tested in reservation-based American Indian students (grades 6-12). Comparing the validity and reliability of the IHS-PESQ on Native populations versus White populations found no major differences, providing initial support that use of the IHS-PESQ in American Indian youth does not lead to poorer psychometric properties compared to the use of the original PESQ in largely white samples. That said, further testing on the IHS-PESQ needs to be done, including further examination of the instrument's predictive validity.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
American Indian/Alaska Native

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IHS-PESQ_inst




AccessNo
464

Name
Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Symptoms Screener

Acronym
SAMISS

Developer
Whetten, Kathryn
Reif, Susan
Swartz, Marvin
Stevens, Rachel
Ostermann, Jan
Hanisch, Laura
Eron, Joseph J. Jr.

Description
The SAMISS is a brief (13 item) screening tool for detecting symptoms of co-occurring disorders. It was developed primarily from existing and tested scales. The SAMISS includes 13 items assessing mental illness symptoms and substance abuse. The substance use screening items include questions from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) regarding frequency and amount of alcohol use; questions from the Two Item Conjoint Screen for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems, which screen for substance abuse/dependence; one question regarding use of illicit drugs such as heroin or cocaine; and one quesiton about abuse of prescription drugs. Five of the six mental health screening questions were from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). These items queried for symptoms of depression, anxiety, and panic attacks in the last year. The final question asks about use of medications for depression or "nerve problems" in the prior 12 months. Patients are considered to have mental illness symptoms if they reported having any of the symptoms of depression, anxiety, or panic assessed by the CIDI questions or if they reported use of medications for depression or "nerve problems" in the prior 12 months.<p>

The SAMISS takes about 5-10 to administer, making it easy and quick to incorporate into standard patient care without requiring significant expenditures or sacrifices frmo other areas of patient care. However, the SAMISS is not a diagnostic instrument and has limited value in predicting specific psychiatric diagnoses.

Availability
The SAMIS is printed in Table 1 of the source reference (Whetten et al 2005). Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Kathryn Whetten, PhD<br>
Duke, Sanford School of Public Policy<br>
tel: 919-613-5430<br>
<a href="mailto:k.whetten@duke.edu">k.whetten@duke.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Symptoms Screener 464.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Whetten K; Reif S; Swartz M; Stevens R; Ostermann J; Hanisch L; Eron JJ. A brief mental health and substance abuse screener for persons with HIV. AIDS Patient Care and STDs 2005;19(2): 89-99.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SAMISS%20/%20Mental+Illness+Symptoms+Screener%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Symptoms Screener (SAMMIS)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2032%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2079%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref (ADAI rp)

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
ns, MB

EntryDate
200611

Year
2005

ValidRely
A study focusing on the use of the SAMISS to screen for co-occurring substance abuse and mental health issues in HIV/AIDS patients found that the SAMISS provided an effective way to quickly identify symptoms of mental illness and substance use problems among people living with HIV. The SAMISS also demonstrated a positive predictive value with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID). However, more research is needed to determine teh specific sensitivity and specificity of the SAMISS.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SAMISS_inst




AccessNo
465

Name
Fast Alcohol Consumption Evaluation

Acronym
FACE

Developer
Dewost, Anne-Violaine
Michaud, Philippe
Arfaoui, Sonia
Gache, Pascal
Lancrenon, Sylvie

Description
To meet the needs of French general practitioners (GPs), a short, five-question interview/screening test for alcohol-related problems that combines items from the AUDIT, CAGE, and TWEAK. The five items include AUDIT questions 1 (Frequency) and 2 (Usual quantity), CAGE questions 2 (Annoyed) and 4 (Eye-opener), and TWEAK question 5 (Black-out), with each question scored on a range of 0 to 4. The FACE provides an opportunity during normal medical practice to screen for heavy drinkers who may benefit from a brief counseling intervention by their GP.

Availability
The FACE Questionnaire and scoring instructions can be found in the source reference.

Contact
Anne-Violaine Dewost<br>
BMCM<br>
3, avenue du General Gallieni<br>
F-92000 Nanterre, France<br>
<a href="mailto:bmcm@anpa.asso.fr">bmcm@anpa.asso.fr</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Fast Alcohol Consumption Evaluation 465.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Dewost AV; Michaud P; Arfaoui S; Gache P; Lancrenon S. Fast Alcohol Consumption Evaluation: A screening instrument adapted for French general practitioners. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2006;30(11):1889-1895.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Fast+Alcohol+Consumption+Evaluation%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Fast Alcohol Consumption Evaluation (FACE)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2032%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2058%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CAGE</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20252%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">TWEAK</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200611

Year
2006

AdminScoring
For each gender the questionnaire contains two distinct cutoffs that separate nondependent heavy drinkers from the "no or low-risk group," and the "abuse or dependence group."

ValidRely
The FACE was validated as an interview questionnaire and is short, with acceptable test values to detect hazardous and harmful drinking separate from abuse or dependence. Sensitivity and specificity are satisfactory.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/FACE_inst




AccessNo
466

Name
Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire

Acronym
PDUQ

Developer
Compton, Peggy
Darakjian, Jack
Miotto, Karen

Description
Clinicians have increasingly begun to understand that physical dependence and tolerance do not constitute addiction in patients with chronic pain who take opioid analgesics regularly. In the context of sanctioned long-term opioid therapy, therefore, it can be difficult to identify addiction. The PDUQ is a 42-item screening tool developed to assist in the recognition of addictive disease in chronic pain patients who use opioid medications to relieve their pain. This screening tool evaluates the pain condition, opioid use patterns, social and family factors, family history of pain and substance abuse syndromes, patient history of substance abuse, and psychiatric history. The interview takes approximately 20 minutes to administer.

Availability
The instrument is printed in Appendix I of the source article (Compton et al 1998).

Contact
Peggy Compton, RN, PhD<br>
UCLA School of Nursing, Factor Building 4-246<br>
Box 956918<br>
Los Angeles, CA 90095-6918

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire 466.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Compton P, Darakjian J, Miotto K. Screening for addiction in patients with chronic pain and "problematic" substance use: Evaluation of a pilot assessment tool. J Pain Symptom Manage 1998;16(6):355-363.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20PDUQ%20/%20Prescription+Drug+Use+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire (PDUQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Compton article -- ADAI rp 09636

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
ns, MB

EntryDate
200611

Year
1998

ValidRely
This questionnaire appears promising in its ability to screen for addictive disease in this clinical population, but it is not intended to be used in isolation. Further testing of the tool by clinicians is needed to establish external validity and reliability.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PDUQ_inst




AccessNo
472

Name
Higher Power Relationship Scale

Acronym
HPRS

Developer
Rowan, Noell L.
Faul, Anna C.
Cloud, Richard N.
Huber, Ruth

Description
The HPRS is a brief instrument designed for easy administration and scoring that may be of use to social work educators, researchers, and practioners, particularly those who work in the field of addictions. Its 17 items measure the degree or magnitude of the relationships that individuals have with their "higher power" (a 12-step program concept that refers to the individuals' understanding of a power greater than themselves). A high score indicates a strong relationship with a higher power; a low score indicates a weaker relationship. The HPRS uses simple, inclusive language to enhance the utility of the scale for respondents.

Availability
A complete copy of the scale can be found in Appendix B of the source reference (p. 94-95). Copyright 2006 by Noell L. Rowan, all rights reserved.

Contact
Noell L. Rowan, LCSW<br>
Kent School of Social Work<br>
University of Louisville<br>
Louisville, KY 40292<br>
<a href="nlrowa01@louisville.edu">nlrowa01@louisville.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Higher Power Relationship Scale 472.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Rowan NL; Faul AC; Cloud RN; Huber R. The Higher Power Relationship Scale: A validation. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 2006;6(3):81-95.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20HPRS%20/%20%28Higher+Power+Relationship+Scale%29%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Higher Power Relationship Scale (HPRS)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200612

Year
2006

AdminScoring
Scoring of this scale is relatively simple. Since all the items are positively written, none require reverse coding. Scoring is done by summing the total number from the 17 items with a lower score indicating a weak relationship with a higher power and a higher score indicating a strong relationship with a higher power.

ValidRely
Study findings indicate that the HPRS is unidimensional, has excellent reliability, and has a low standard error of measurement (SEM). Strong content validity has been substantiated, and collectively, the data demonstrate support fro the HPRS in terms of construct validity.

Status
public

Population
Adults
African Americans

Permalink
http://bit.ly/HPRS_inst




AccessNo
473

Name
Two Item Conjoint Screen for Alcohol and Other Drug Problems

Acronym
TICS

Developer
Brown, Richard L.
Leonard, Tom
Saunders, Laura A.
Papasouliotis, Orestis

Description
A "conjoint" screening question is one that inquires about experiences with both alcohol and other drugs. Though conjoint screening questions carry some disadvantages (an alcohol-only user may avoid responding affirmatively to a question that also includes drugs, and conjoint questions also do not detect specific substances of abuse), they do carry benefits as well. For one thing, patients who use multiple substances may be more likely to respond positively to a conjoint question than to questions about each specific substance. Additionally, conjoint screening questions allow clinicians to screen for alcohol and drug problems much more rapidly. <p>

The TICS is a brief, conjoint screen that asks two essential questions: "In the last year, have you ever drunk or used drugs more than you meant to?" and "Have you felt you wanted or needed to cut down on your drinking or drug user in the last year?" A "yes" answer to either or both questions has demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of nearly 80% for current alcohol abuse or drug dependence, excluding nicotine. Like the CAGE, the TICS can easily be administered verbally from memory and incorporated into standard medical interviews. Compared with other screens on for alcohol or drug problems, the TICS is briefer and has similar or better sensitivity and specificity.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The TICS contains only two questions, both of which are in the description (above) and the source reference.

Contact
Richard L. Brown, MD, MPH<br>
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School<br>
777 South Mills St.<Br>
Madison, WI 53715

ADAI
The two questions of the scale are in the description above.

SourceRef
Brown RL; Leonard T; Saunders LA; Papasouliotis O. A two-item screening test for alcohol and other drug problems. J Fam Pract 1997;44(2):151-160.

OtherRef
Brown RL; Leonard T; Saunders LA; Papsouliotis O. A two-item conjoint screen for alcohol and other drug problems. J Am Board Fam Pract 2001;14(2):95-106.

SourceInfo
Brown 2001 (other refs above)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200612

Year
1997

AdminScoring
One or more affirmative responses should be regarded as a positive screening result for a substance abuse problem.

ValidRely
The clinical utility of screening devices is best characterized, not by the sensitivity or specificity, but by predictive values and likelihood ratios. In Brown RL et al (2001), the TICS was found to have a negative predictive value of 92.7%, indicating that only 7.3% of those with a negative screening result have a substance use disorder. The positive predictive value was 51.8%, indicating that slightly half of persons with a positive TICS actually have a disorder. More specifically, one positive response indicated a 36.5% chance of a disorder, whereas two positive responses indicated a 72.4% chance.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TICscreen_inst




AccessNo
477

Name
German Addictive Buying Scale

Acronym
GABS

Developer
Scherhorn, Gerhard
Reisch, Lucia A.
Raab, Gerhard

Description
Also called the "German Addictive Buying Indicator," this 16-item scale is based on the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) developed by Valence et al. in 1988 (see Other References, below). The GABS operationalizes buying or shopping addiction using questions related to difficulties in managing money, impulsive buying behavior, the use of buying as a coping mechanism, and the feeling of guilt following buying things. Participants mark options on a four-point Likert scale indicating their level of agreement with certain statements (from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree"). Sample items include: "When I have money, I feel the need to spend it," "After buying something, I often ask myself if it was really so important," "I often buy things just because they're cheap," and "I often don't dare to show others the things I've bought because I might seem like an irresponsible person."

Availability
A copy of the scale (in English) can be found in the appendix of the Rodriguez-Villarino et al 2006 article above (Other References). Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Gerhard Scherhorn<br>
Professor of Consumer Electronics<br>
University of Hohenhein, Institute of Home and Consumer Electronics<br>
PO Box 700562, D-7000<br>
Stuttgart 70, FRG.

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\German Addictive Buying Scale 477.pdf [from Rodriguez-Villarino et al, 2006; English version]

SourceRef
Scherhorn G; Reisch LA; Raab G. Addictive buying in West Germany: An empirical study. Journal of Consumer Policy 1990;13(4):355-387.

OtherRef
Rodriguez-Villarino R; Gonzalez-Lorenzo M; Fernandez-Gonzalez A; Lameiras-Fernandez M; Foltz ML. Individual factors associated with buying addiction: An empirical study. Addiction Research and Theory 2006;14(5):511-525.
Valence G; d'Astous A; Fortier L. Compulsive buying: Concept and measurement. Journal of Consumer Policy 1988;11:419-433.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20German+Addictive+Buying%29%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: German Addictive Buying Scale (GABS)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20478%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref, other ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200612

Year
1990

ValidRely
The GABS has been shown to be valid, one-dimensional, and reliable. It has strong construct validity and correlates with psychasthenia, depression, and self-esteem. The instrument's extreme-group validity was confirmed by the fact the average score of extreme buying addicts was significantly higher than that of normal buyers (45 vs. 27; p < 0.01). The GABS was also found to have a high degree of internal consistency when using respondents self-labeled as buying addicts (Cronbach's alpha of 0.87), and even more so when combining them when participants from the general population (Cronbach's alpha of 0.92).

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/GABS_inst




AccessNo
478

Name
Compulsive Buying Scale

Acronym
CBS

Developer
Valence, Gilles
d'Astous, Alain
Fortier, Louis
Faber, Ronald J.
O'Guinn, T.

Description
The Compulsive Buying Scale is designed to screen for buying or shopping addiction, assessing the level of compulsive-like buying behavior in a respondent. The original thirteen question version of this scale uses items built around three dimensions: tendency to spend (items 1, 2, 9, 10, 11, and 12), reactive aspect (items 3, 4, 5, and 8), and post-purchase guilt (items 6, 7, and 13). The items are sufficiently general to apply to excessive as well as moderate compulsive-like buying behavior. Items include statements such as "When I have money, I cannot help but spend part or the whole of it," "At times, I have felt somewhat guilty after buying a product, because it seemed unreasonable," and "I often have an unexplainable urge, a sudden and spontaneous desire, to go and buy something in a store." Respondents rate the each statement on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from "very often" to "never."<p>

In 1992, R. Faber and T. O'Guinn modified this scale to create a seven-item version also called the "Compulsive Buying Scale." The seven scale items in this version reflect a need to spend money (items 1 and 6), awareness that spending behavior is aberrant (item 2), loss of control (items 3 and 4), buying things to improve mood (item 5), and probable financial problems (item 7). Both versions of the scale perform well psychometrically.

Availability
The source references above contain the scale items.

Contact
Ronald J. Faber, PhD.<br>
Director of Graduate Studies<br>
University of Minnesota School of Journalism and Communication<br>
tel: 612-626-0061<br>
<a href="mailto:faber001@umn.edu">faber001@umn.edu<br>
url: <a href="http://sjmc.umn.edu/aboutus/fac_rfaber.html">http://sjmc.umn.edu/aboutus/fac_rfaber.html</a>

SourceRef
Valence G; d'Astous A; Fortier L. Compulsive buying: Concept and measurement. Journal of Consumer Policy 1988;11(4):419-433. (original 13-item version)
Faber RJ, O’Guinn TC: A clinical screener for compulsive buying. J Consumer Res 1992; 19(3):459–469. (modified 7-item version)

OtherRef
d'Astous A. An inquiry into the compulsive side of "normal" consumers. J Consumer Policy 1990;13(1):15-31.
Black DW; Monahan P; Schlosser S; Repertinger S. Compulsive buying severity: an analysis of Compulsive Buying Scale results in 44 subjects. J Nerv Ment Dis 2001;189(2):123-6
Koran LM; Faber RJ; Aboujaoude E; Large MD; Serpe RT. Estimated prevalence of compulsive buying behavior in the United States. [uses the seven-item screener] Am J Psychiatry 2006;163(1):1806-1812

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20477%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">German Addictive Buying Scale (GABS)</a>

SourceInfo
source refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200612

Year
1990

ValidRely
The Compulsive Buying Scale has demonstrated a satisfactory level of reliability and validity.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CBScale_inst




AccessNo
487

Name
Eating Attitudes Test

Acronym
EAT

Developer
Garner, David M.
Garfinkel, Paul E.

Description
The Eating Attitudes Test is designed to help a subject determine if their eating behaviors and attitudes warrant further evaluation. It is one of the most widely-used scales for assessing anorexia nervosa. There are three versions of the EAT: a 12-item version (EAT-12), a 26-item version (EAT-26) and a 40-item version (EAT-40). A simplified version of the scale (14 items with 5 factors) for younger children is also available (the ChEAT). Each version includes statements about various eating behaviors, each rated by the respondent on a Likert-type scale ranging from 0 (never) to 3 (always). Statements include behaviors such as "I am terrified about being overweight," "I am aware of the calorie content of foods that I eat," "I vomit after I have eaten," and "I like my stomach to be empty." The EAT-26 has been studied in a variety of populations, including adults, adolescents, and college students, and a large amount of literature has documented the use of the EAT in a variety of cultures, including Mexico, Brazil, Japan, Zulu populations in South Africa, Croatia, Arabic countries, Turkey, and many others. Though the EAT has been found to be very effective in detecting probable cases of eating disorders, the measure was originally developed to assess the specific behaviors and attitudes of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and its validity as a "case-finding" instrument has not always been supported.

Availability
The EAT is copyrighted by the authors. It is available (with permission) for free on the web on a variety of sites, including: <a href="http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/Eating_Disorders/concernedcounseling/eat/EATtest.htm">HealthyPlace.com</a> (interactive online version) and the <a href="http://studenthealth.missouri.edu/EatingAttitudesTest.doc">University of Missouri-Columbia Student Health site</a> (Word document with scoring instructions).

InstURL
http://www.healthyplace.com/communities/Eating_Disorders/concernedcounseling/eat/EATtest.htm

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Eating Attitutdes Test 487.pdf
[EAT-26 version]

SourceRef
Garner DM; Garfinkel PE. The Eating Attitudes Test: An index of symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Psychological Medicine 1979; 9: 273–279.

OtherRef
Deady M. A Review of Screening, Assessment and Outcome Measures for Drug and Alcohol Settings. NSW Health Department, 2009, 225p. Free online: <a href="http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf">http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf</a>.
Gross J; Rosen JC; Leitenberg H; Willmuth ME. Validity of the Eating Attitudes Test and the Eating Disorders Inventory in bulimia nervosa. J Consult Clin Psychol 1986;54(6):875-6.
Williams P; Hand D; Tarnopolsky A. The problem of screening for uncommon disorders -- a comment on the Eating Attitudes Test. Psychol Med 1982; 12(2):431-4.
Garner DM; Olmstead MP; Bohr Y; Garfinkel PE. The Eating Attitudes Test: Psychometric features and clinical correlates. Psychol Med 1982;12(4):871-8 [development of the EAT-26 from the EAT-40].
Carter PI; Moss RA. Screening for anorexia and bulimia nervosa in a college population: problems and limitations. Addictive Behaviors 1984;9(4):417-9.
Wells JE; Coope PA; Gabb DC; Pears RK. The factor structure of the Eating Attitudes Test with adolescent schoolgirls. Psychol Med 1985;15(1):141-6.
Lynch WC; Eppers-Reynolds K. Children's Eating Attitudes Test: Revised factor structure for adolescent girls. Eat Weight Disord 2005;10(4):222-35.
Canals J; Carbajo G; Fernandez-Ballart J. Discriminant validity of the Eating Attitudes Test according to American Psychiatric Association and World Health Organization criteria of eating disorders. Psychol Rep 2002;91(3 Pt 2):1052-6
Garfinkel PE; Newman A. The Eating Attitudes Test: Twenty-five years later. Eat Weight Disord 2001;6(1):1-24
Englesen BK; Hagtvet KA. The dimensionality of the 12-item version of the Eating Attitudes Test. Confirmatory factor analyses. Scand J Psychol 1999;40(4):293-300.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Eating+Attitudes+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Eating Attitudes Test (EAT)</a>

SourceInfo
source and other refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1979

InstURLHost
HealthyPlace.com

AdminScoring
All but one of the items (item 26) are scored by simply adding up the point values assigned by the Likert scale (i.e. "Always" is 3 points, "Never" is 0). Item 26, "I enjoy trying new rich foods," is scored in the reverse: Always (0), Usually (0), Often (0), Sometimes (1), Rarely (2), Never (3). A final score of over 20 suggests that the respondent may need further evaluation for an eating disorder.

ValidRely
The EAT-26 is a reliable, valid and economical instrument which may be used as an objective measure of the symptoms of eating disorders (including anorexia and bulimia).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/EAT_inst




AccessNo
499

Name
Children of Alcoholics Screening Test

Acronym
CAST

Developer
Jones, John W.

Description
The CAST was developed to help identify children who are experiencing or have experienced difficulties living with alcoholic parents. The questionnaire consists of 30 yes or no items, with scores ranging from 0 to 30. The cutoff score for identifying children of alcoholics is set at 6 or more. The higher the score, the more a family is affected by alcoholism. Scale items include questions such as "Have you ever thought that one of your parents had a drinking problem?", "Did you ever feel that you made a parent drink alcohol?", and "Have you ever felt sick, cried, or had a knot in your stomach after worrying about a parent's drinking?"

Availability
Copyright 1983 by John Jones.

InstURL
http://www.lightheart.com/PDF/CASTtest.pdf

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Children of Alcoholics Screening Test 499.pdf

SourceRef
Jones JW. The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test. Bulletin of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behavior 1983;2:155-163.
Jones JW. The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). Chicago: Family Recovery Press, 1981.
Jones JW. The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test. Chicago: Camelot, 1991.

OtherRef
Sheridan MJ. A psychometric assessment of the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST). J Stud Alcohol 1995;56(2):156-60.
Charland H; Cote G. The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST): Test-retest reliability and concordance validity. J Clin Psychol 1998;54(7):995-1003.
Dinning WD; Berk AL. The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test: Relationship to sex, family environment, and social adjustment in adolescents. J Clin Psychol 1989;45:335-339.
Staley D; El-Guebaly N. Psychometric evaluation of the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST) in a psychiatric sample. Int J Addict 1991;26:657-668.
Lease SH; Yanico BJ. Evidence of validity for the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test. Measurement Eval Counseling Development 1995;27:200-210.
Yeatman FR; Bogart CJ; Geer FA; Sirridge ST. Children of alcoholics screening test : Internal consistency, factor structure, and relationship to measures of family environment. J Clin Psychol 1994;50(6):931-936.
Hodgins DC ; Shimp L. Identifying adult children of alcoholics: methodological review and a comparison of the CAST-6 with other methods. Addiction 1995;90(2):255-267.
Amodeo M; Griffin ML. Sibling agreement on retrospective reports of parental alcoholism and other childhood events. Substance Use and Misuse 2009;44(7):943-964.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Children+of+Alcoholics+Screening+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20677%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Children of Alcoholics Screening Test - Short Form (CAST-6)</a>

SourceInfo
Other references

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1983

InstURLHost
The Lightheart Institute

ValidRely
The CAST has demonstrated high reliability and validity, including good internal consistency, high item-total scale correlations, and near perfect test-retest agreement (Charland & Cote, 1998). For detailed psychometric information, see Other References, above.

Status
public

Population
Children of alcoholics
Children
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAST_inst




AccessNo
511

Name
Drug History Questionnaire (or Psychoactive Drug History Questionnaire)

Acronym
DHQ
PDHQ

Developer
Sobell, Linda C.
Kwan, Even
Sobell, Mark B.

Description
The Drug History Questionnaire is a one-page form that takes about 5 to 10 minutes to complete and collects data for nine different drug classes: alcohol, cannabis, hallucinogens, depressants, inhalants, narcotics, stimulants, tranquilizers, and other drugs. For each drug class, the following information is collected: was the drug ever used and, if so: (a) number of years used; (b) whether the drug was ever prescribed; (c) year last used; and (d) frequency of past use during a typical month (e.g., 2-3 times a week, once a month, daily). A revised version of the DHQ also records the age a drug was first used and the route of administration. This scale is also sometimes referred to as the Psychoactive Drug History Questionnaire (PDHQ).

Availability
Copyright 2003 by Sobell & Sobell.

Contact
Linda S. Sobell, PhD<br>
<a href="mailto:sobelll@nova.edu">sobelll@nova.edu</a>

InstURL
http://www.nova.edu/gsc/forms/DrugHistoryQuest.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Drug History Questionnaire 511.pdf

SourceRef
Sobell LC; Kwan E; Sobell MB. Reliability of a Drug History Questionnaire (DHQ). Addict Behav 1995;20(2):233-241. [A copy of the scale can be found in the Appendix.]

OtherRef
Butler GK; Montgomery AM. Impulsivity, risk taking and recreational 'ecstasy' (MDMA) use. Drug Alcohol Depend 2004;76(1):55-62.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DHQ%20/%20Drug+History+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drug History Questionnaire (DHQ)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1995

InstURLHost
Nova Southeastern University

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DrugHistQ_inst




AccessNo
515

Name
Alcoholism Self-Test

Developer
National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

Description
This self-test helps a respondent review the role alcohol plays in their life. The questions incorporate many of the common symptoms of alcoholism and is intended to help the respondent determine whether or not they or someone they know needs to find out more about alcoholism. It is not intended to be used to establish the diagnosis of alcoholism, but can be a useful informational tool. The 26 yes/no items on this scale include questions such as "Can you handle more alcohol now than when you first started to drink?", "Have you been having more blackouts recently?", and "Do you ever feel depressed or anxious before, during, or after periods of heavy drinking?"

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcoholism Self-Test 515.pdf

SourceInfo
NCADD web site, print copy of scale.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1980

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AlcoholSelfTest_inst




AccessNo
516

Name
Mortimer-Filkins Test

Developer
Mortimer, R. G.
Filkins, L. D.

Description
This scale was designed spcifically to identify problem drinkers among DUI offenders and therefore has been used widely in DUI education and treatment programs. The Mortimer-Filkins contains 54 scored questions, 4 nonscored questions, and a somewhat complicated scoring procedure. For the most part, this test uses indirect means to identify problem drinkers. That is, most of the questions address issues that are highly correlated with problem drinking rather than direct questions about the use of alcohol. This makes it more difficult for a DUI offender to know why a particular question is being asked and therefore, it is more difficult to disguise a drinking problem. This test has been found to be highly stable and reliable, and is a reasonable tool for identification of DUI offenders at high risk of DUI recidivism.

Availability
The ADAI Library has archived a copy of this scale for research and educational purposes. Copyright information unavailable.

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Mortimer Filkins Test 516.pdf

SourceRef
Mortimer RG; Filkins LD; Lower JS. Development of court procedures for identifying problem drinkers: Final report. Report No. DOT-HS-800-631. U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration: Washington, DC, 1971.

OtherRef
Wendling A; Kolody B. An evaluation of the Mortimer-Filkins test as a predictor of alcohol-impaired driving recidivism. J Stud Alcohol 1982;43(7):751-66.
Jacobson GR. Detection, assessment, and diagnosis of alcoholism. Current techniques. Recent Dev Alcohol 1983;1:377-413.
Webb GR. The Mortimer-Filkins test of problem drinking: A review of psychometric properties. Br J Addict 1990;85:1491-1494.
Webb GR; Redman S; Hennrikus D; Sanson-Fisher RW. The reliability and stability of the Mortimer-Filkins Test. J Stud Alcohol 1992;53:561-567.
Snow RW; Wells-Parker E. Relationships between drinking problems and drinking locations among convicted drinking drivers. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2001;27(3):531-542.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Mortimer+Filkins+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Mortimer-Filkins Test</a>

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1971

Status
public

Population
Adults
Offenders
DUI/DWI drivers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MortimerFilkins_inst




AccessNo
517

Name
Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg Scale

Acronym
KMSK

Developer
Kellogg, Scott H.
McHugh, Pauline F.
Bell, Kathy
Schluger, James H.
Schluger, Rosemary P.
LaForge, K. Steven
Ho, Ann
Kreek, Mary Jeanne

Description
This scale was designed to quickly test for addiction to cocaine, heroin, and alcohol simply by asking about the time in the person's life when he or she was drinking or using these substances the most. It takes about five minutes to administer, and only three answers influence the patient's score: the duration of the heaviest period of use, the frequency of use during that time, and the amount typically consumed at one sitting during that time. While most other brief tests for drug or alcohol addiction ask about the negative consequences of substance abuse, such as neglect of work or family responsibilities, the KMSK is the first to focus solely on the intensity of alcohol or substance use, an important contributor to addiction.

Availability
This scale is available in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and Hebrew. A copy of the scale can be found in Appendix A of the source reference.

Contact
Mary Jeanne Kreek, PhD<br>
tel: 212-327-8248<br>
<a href="mailto:kreek@rockvax.rockefeller.edu">kreek@rockvax.rockefeller.edu</a>

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg Scale 517.pdf

SourceRef
Kellogg SH; McHugh PF; Bell K; Schluger JH; Schluger RP; LaForge KS; Ho A; Kreek MJ. The Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg scale: A new, rapid method for quantifying substance abuse and its possible applications. Drug Alcohol Depend 2003;69(2):137-150. [Includes a copy of the scale.]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20KMSK%20/%20Kreek+McHugh+Schluger+Kellogg+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg Scale (KMSK)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
2003

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/KMSK_inst




AccessNo
520

Name
FAS Screen

Developer
Burd, Larry
Cox, Chaun
Poitra, Betty
Wentz, Tom
Ebertowski, Mary
Martsolf, John T.
Kerbeshian, Jacob
Klug, Marilyn G.

Description
The FAS Screen is a rapid, 32 item tool developed for community-based screening of FAS in 4-18 year olds, an age range that encompasses the time when children are in contact with well-established screening systems (school readiness screening) and a developmental period when the signs of FAS are prominent. It focuses on three areas: growth impairment, neurologic dysfunction, and facial features. It has demonstrated acceptable performance characteristics and is cost-effective.

Availability
Copyright 1999 by Larry Burd, PhD. A copy of the scale can be found in the Appendix of the source reference.

Contact
Larry Burd, Ph.D., MCRH-CETP<br>
1300 S. Columbia Road<br>
Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA<br>
tel: 701-780 2477

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder (source reference with scale).
Source ref with scale: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Articles\FAS Screen Burd Cox et al 1999.pdf
Just the scale: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\FAS Screen 520.pdf

SourceRef
Burd L; Cox C; Poitra B; Wentz T; Ebertowski M; Martsolf JT; Kerbeshian J; Klug MG. The FAS Screen: A rapid screening tool for fetal alcohol syndrome. Addiction Biology 1999;4:329-336.

OtherRef
Poitra BA; Marion S; Dionne M; Wilkie E; Dauphinais P; Wilkie-Pepion M; Martsolf JT; Klug MG; Burd L. A school-based screening program for fetal alcohol syndrome. Neurotoxicology and Teratology 2003;25:725-729. [<a href="http://fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/documents/school_based_screening.pdf">free online</a>]
Burd L; Olson M; Juelson T. A strategy for community-based screening for fetal alcohol syndrome. Online resource (originally published in 2003, revised in 2005): <a href="http://www.excellence-earlychildhood.ca/documents/Burd-Olson-JuelsonANGxp_rev.pdf">http://www.excellence-earlychildhood.ca/documents/Burd-Olson-JuelsonANGxp_rev.pdf</a>.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20FAS+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: FAS Screen</a>

SourceInfo
refs.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Year
1999

AdminScoring
This screen should be administered by staff trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of FAS. A score of 20 or above on the FAS Screen indicates that a referral for further evaluation is warranted.

ValidRely
The source reference study found that the estimated values for the FAS Screen were: specificity 94.1%, sensitivity 100%, positive predictive value 9.1% and negative predictive value 100%.

Status
public

Population
Children
Adolescents
American Indian/Alaska Native

Permalink
http://bit.ly/FASScreen_inst




AccessNo
527

Name
Openness to Spiritual Ideas Questionnaire

Acronym
OSIQ

Description
This scale asks four questions regarding the respondent's openness to spiritual ideas (specifically those commonly associated with 12-step programs like Alcoholics Anonymous). The items include questions like: "How much do you believe in the existence of a 'Higher Power'?" and "How willing would you be to listen to another if they talk about 'spiritual matters' in a treatment program?" This scale can be used to gauge a respondent's suitability for a 12-step or other "spiritually-focused" treatment or recovery program.

Availability
The ADAI Library has archived a copy of this instrument for research and educational purposes.

ADAI
Print copy in instrument binder.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Openness to Spiritual Ideas Questionnaire 527.pdf

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening
Treatment planning

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/OSIQ_inst




AccessNo
536

Name
Hospital Screening Study

Acronym
HSS

Developer
Streissguth, Ann P.

Description
This measure was developed as part of the Pregnancy and Health Study at the University of Washington, which aimed to help reduce perinatal chemical dependency and its devastating effects by improving identification of drug use prior to or early in pregnancy. This scale was given to new mothers in Seattle in order to collect data on the kinds of drugs women are taking before and during their pregnancies. It lists several different substances (marijuana, heroin, cocaine, prescription medications, cigarettes, and alcohol) and asks the respondent to circle "yes" or "no" depending on whether or not they used the substance in the "month or so before pregnancy" or "during this pregnancy."

Contact
Ann P. Streissguth, PhD<br>
tel: 206-543-7155

ADAI
Source ref: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Articles\Hospital Screening Study Taylor 1999.pdf
Scale alone: G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Hospital Screening Study 536.pdf
Print copy in instrument binder (just the scale).

SourceRef
Taylor P (ed.). Guidelines for Screening for Substance Abuse During Pregnancy. Olympia, WA : WA State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health, 1999.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200701

Status
public

Population
Women
Pregnant women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/HSS_inst




AccessNo
556

Name
Substance Dependence Screening Questionnaire

Acronym
SDSQ

Developer
Vazquez, Fernando L.
Blanco, Vanessa
Lopez, Maria

Description
This brief, easily administered screening instrument is intended to identify persons meeting diagnostic criteria for drug dependence in non-clinical populations. The SDSQ comprises 11 items, the aim of which is to determine whether the subject is currently suffering or has ever suffered from substance dependence (maladaptive consumption of a psychoactive substance resulting in clinically significant impairment or distress) according to the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). It is based on the substance abuse sections of SCID-CV and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI).

Availability
Appendix A of the Source Ref contains the instrument (in English).

Contact
Fernando L. Vazquez<br>
Departmento de Psicologia Clinica y Psicobiologia<br>
Facultad de Psicologia<br>
Universidad de Santiago de Compostela<br>
Campus Universitario Sur<br>
15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain<br>
<a href="mailto:pcfer@usc.es">pcfer@usc.es</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Substance Dependence Screening Questionnaire 556.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Vazquez FL; Blanco V; Lopez M. Performance of a new substance dependence screening questionnaire (SDSQ) in a non-clinical population. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(5):1082-1087. [includes copy of scale]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20SDSQ%20/%20Substance+Dependence+Screening+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Substance Dependence Screening Questionnaire (SDSQ)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200703

Year
2007

AdminScoring
The SDSQ comprises 11 items (plus 5 additional items associated with item 1). Item 1 obtains relevant non-diagnostic information (the substance in question, intensity of consumption, current or past, etc.); items 2-7 cover the first six of the seven DSM-IV-TR criteria for substance dependence; and items 8-11 jointly cover the seventh criterion (continued use in spite of awareness of harm). Substance dependence is tentatively diagnosed if, in relation to a single 12-month perioid, the subject responds affirmatively to three or more of items 2-7, or to at least two of items 2-7 plus either or both of items 9 and 11 (items 8 and 10 merely determine whether items 9 and 10 are pertinent for any particular respondent.

ValidRely
The SDSQ shows good diagnostic validity, especially for women.

Status
public

Population
College students
Hispanics
Women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SDSQ_inst




AccessNo
567

Name
Indigenous Risk Impact Screen

Acronym
IRIS

Developer
Schlesinger, Carla M.
Ober, Coralie
McCarthy, Molly M.
Watson, Joanne D.
Seinen, Anita

Description
The Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS) was developed to screen for both alcohol/drug and mental health issues, with the broad aim of finding "at risk" individuals, of providing timely advice to clients about the potential risk, and of enabling Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and mainstream substance misuse and health agencies to better respond to client needs and provide appropriate and timely referrals.<p>
The IRIS screens, in a culturally appropriate manner, for both alcohol/drug and mental health risk within one instrument, recognizing the high co-occurrence of the two issues. It also measures alcohol and drug use in terms of total substance use, whereby the individual reports on his/her overall drug use, rather than each drug separately or primary drug use only. The IRIS drug and alcohol subscale shows promise in terms of its ability to screen for binge drinking.<p>
The IRIS screen would be feasible for use in general health-care settings as it is delivered quickly and easily comprehensible to Indigenous clients.

Availability
Appendix 1 of the Source ref (Schlesinger, 2007) contains the IRIS item set.

Contact
Carla Schlesinger<br>
Centre for Drug and Alcohol Studies<br>
The Prince Charles Hospital Health Service District<br>
Brisbane, Queensland 4000, Australia<br>
<a href="mailto:Carla_Schlesinger@health.qld.gov.au">Carla_Schlesinger@health.qld.gov.au</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Indigenous Risk Impact Screen 567.pdf

SourceRef
Schlesinger CM; Ober C; McCarthy MM; Watson JD; Seinen A. The development and validation of the Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS): a 13-item screening instrument for alcohol and drug and mental health risk. Drug and Alcohol Review 2007;26(2):109-117.

OtherRef
Deady M. A Review of Screening, Assessment and Outcome Measures for Drug and Alcohol Settings. NSW Health Department, 2009, 225p. Free online: <a href="http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf">http://www.ntcoss.org.au/sites/www.ntcoss.org.au/files/Review_of_Measures_09.pdf</a>.
Ober C, Dingle K, Clavarino A, et al. Validating a screening tool for mental health and substance use risk in an Indigenous prison population. Drug Alcohol Rev 2013;32(6):611-7.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Indigenous+Risk+Impact+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Indigenous Risk Impact Screen (IRIS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200704

Year
2007

AdminScoring
13 items; variable Likert scale.
Training and support in the appropriate use of the IRIS is available through the Centre for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Alcohol and Drug Service, the Prince Charles Hospital Health Service District.

ValidRely
The IRIS demonstrates strong internal consistency, convergent validity and evidenced valid cut-offs for determining symptomatic individuals in terms of drug and alcohol use and mental health problems in Indigenous Australian populations.

Status
public

Population
Co-occurring clients
Offenders

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IRIS_inst




AccessNo
568

Name
Problematic Use of Narcotics

Acronym
PUN

Developer
Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
Sieroslawski, Janusz

Description
The PUN is a brief screening test for illicit drug problem use by adolescents in Poland. The final version of the PUN uses 10 yes/no items addressing experiences associated with drug use in the past 12 months. Items include questions such as, "Have you ever skipped school classes or come late to school because of drugs?" "Have you ever bought drugs from drug dealer?" "Do you often feel desire for drugs?" and "Have you had problems with the police because of drug use?" It is easy to administer and score, and may significantly improve identification of adolescents with drug related problems by school counsellrs, teachers, primary health, and social care specialists.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The ten items in the final version of the PUN are listed in Table 1 of the source reference.

Contact
Katarzyna Okulicz-Kozaryn<br>
<a href="mailto:kokuliez@ipin.edu.pl">kokuliez@ipin.edu.pl</a><br>
Sieroslawski, Janusz<br>
<a href="mailto:sierosla@ipin.edu.pl">sierosla@ipin.edu.pl</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Problematic Use of Narcotics 568.pdf
[from source ref]

SourceRef
Okulicz-Kozaryn K; Sieroslawski J. Validation of the "problematic use of narcotics" (PUN) screening test for drug using adolescents. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(3):640-646.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Problematic+Use+of+Narcotics%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Problematic Use of Narcotics (PUN)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
pm, MB

EntryDate
200703

Year
2007

AdminScoring
Test scores are calculated by summing positive answers (indicating the presence of a problem associated with drug use).

ValidRely
This study provides supportive evidence for the validity of the PUN test to detect problematic drug use by adolescents. The test showed potential as a brief screening tool. It is easy to administer, score, and its psychometric properties are satisfactory.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PUN_inst




AccessNo
571

Name
Opioid Risk Tool

Acronym
ORT

Developer
Webster, Lynn R.
Webster, Rebecca M.

Description
Early awareness of aberrant medication-taking behavior and subsequent physician action could disrupt behavioral patterns of medication misuse and addiction, and improve treatment outcomes. The ORT is an office-based tool designed to predict the probablility of a patient displaying aberrant behaviors when prescribed opioids for chronic pain. It assesses patients for family and personal history of alcohol; illegal drug and prescription substance abuse; age; history of preadolescent sexual abuse; and specific mental disorders. Each risk factor is weighted and attributed a point value believed to reflect its risk relative to the other risk factors. The ORT has high sensitivity and specificity for determining patients at risk for opioid-related aberrant medication-taking behavior.
<p>
Note: Jones & Passik (2011) describe 2 variations of the ORT: the patient-completed ORT (PC-ORT) and the clinician-completed ORT (CC-ORT). The clinician-administered version demonstrated better prediction of aberant drug taking behavior than the patient version, possibly due to comprehension issues.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Lynn R. Webster, MD<br>
Lifetree Pain Clinic and Clinical Research<br>
3838 South 700 East, Suite 200<br>
Salt Lake City, UT 84106, USA<br>
tel: 801-261-4988<br>
<a href="mailto:lynnw@lifetreepain.com">lynnw@lifetreepain.com</a>

InstURL
http://www.partnersagainstpain.com/printouts/Opioid_Risk_Tool.pdf

SourceRef
Webster LR; Webster RM. Predicting aberrant behaviors in opioid-treated patients: preliminary validation of the Opioid Risk Tool. Pain Medicine 2005; 6(6):432-442. doi/10.1111/j.1526-4637.2005.00072.x/pdf

OtherRef
Weaver M; Schnoll S. Addiction issues in prescribing opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Journal of Addiction Medicine 2007;1(1):2-10.
Jones T, Passik SD. A comparison of methods of administering the Opioid Risk Tool. Journal of Opioid Management 2011;7(5):347-51.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Opioid+Risk+Tool%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Opioid Risk Tool (ORT)</a>

SourceInfo
Other ref (Weaver, 2007) and Source ref (Webster, 2005)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, NS

EntryDate
200704

Year
2005

InstURLHost
Partners Against Pain

AdminScoring
Each item in the ORT is weighted and assigned a point value believed to reflect its risk relative to the other risk factors. A score of 0-3 indicates "low risk" (of opioid medication misuse), 4-7 indicates "moderate risk," and a score of greater than 8 indicates high risk.

ValidRely
In a preliminary study, among patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain, the ORT exhibited a high degree of sensitivity and specificity for determining which individuals are at risk for opioid-related, aberrant behaviors. Further studies in a variety of pain and nonpain settings are needed to determine the ORT's universal applicability.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ORT_inst




AccessNo
572

Name
Pain Medication Questionnaire

Acronym
PMQ

Developer
Adams, Laura L.
Gatchel, Robert J.
Robinson, Richard C.
Polatin, Peter
Gajraj, Noor
Deschner, Martin
Noe, Carl

Description
The PMQ was developed to screen for addiction in patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. The 26-item instrument was constructed based on suspected behavioral correlates of opioid medication misuse, which heretofore have received limited empirical investigation. It is designed for use in a busy clinic environment, to identify patients on a range of potential risk, based on the extent to which they self-report certain related behaviors. No mention is specifically made of opioid medication in the scale items, so that patients taking any form of pain medication could be measured on the same set of behaviors and attitudes. A specific effort was made to use language in item-construction that was as neutral and non-threatening as possible, in order to encourage candid responding. A readability analysis found the instrument to fall at grade 7.5 level.<p>

Availability
For permisssion to use this instrument, contact Robert Gatchel. A copy of the instrument is located in the appendix at the end of the source reference (Adams, 2004).

Contact
Robert J. Gatchel<br>
The Eugene McDermott Center for Pain Management, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas<br>
5323 Harry Hines Boulevard<br>
Dallas, TX 75390 USA<br>
<a href="mailto:robert.gatchel@utsouthwestern.edu">robert.gatchel@utsouthwestern.edu</a>

ADAI
Source ref is in reprint file.
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Pain Medication Questionnaire 572.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Adams LL; Gatchel RJ; Robinson RC; et al. Development of a self-report screening instrument for assessing potential opioid medication misuse in chronic pain patients. J Pain Symptom Manage 2004; 27(5):440-459.

OtherRef
Weaver M; Schnoll S. Addiction issues in prescribing opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. Journal of Addiction Medicine 2007; 1(1):2-10.
Holmes CP; Gatchel RJ; Adams LL; Stowell AW; Hatten A; Noe C; Leland L. An opioid screening instrument: long-term evaluation of the utility of the Pain Medication Questionnaire. Pain Practice 2006 Jun;6(2):74-88.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Pain+Medication+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Pain Medication Questionnaire (PMQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref and Other refs.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200704

Year
2004

AdminScoring
Items are structured in the form of statements, to which patients indicate their degree of agreement or behavioral conformity on a 5-point Likert scale (with 0 meaning "Disagree" and 4 "Agree"). An overall score is derived by summing the item-scores for the 26 items, with a minimum possible score of 0 (26 items × 0 points) and a maximum possible score of 104 (26 items × 4 points). Higher overall scores were assumed to reflect a greater presence of behaviors associated with potential risk for opioid misuse. To minimize the probability of a negative or positive response bias, some items were developed to capture behaviors believed to be inversely related to risk for opioid misuse. Reverse numeration was applied to these items (e.g., Disagree = 4, Agree = 0).

ValidRely
Reliability coefficients for the PMQ were found to be of moderate but acceptable strength. Construct and concurrent validity were examined through correlation of PMQ scores to measures of substance abuse, physical and psychological functioning, and physicians' risk assessments.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PMQ_inst




AccessNo
576

Name
Acute Hangover Scale

Acronym
AHS

Developer
Rohsenow, Damaris J.
Howland, Jonathan
Minsky, Sara J.
Greece, Jacey
Almeida, Alissa
Roehrs, Timothy A.

Description
The 9-item Acute Hangover Scale is based on symptoms supported in experimental investigations of hangover. The scale is intended to be administered within 10-20 minutes after the subject has been awakened after a session of drinking, when hangover symptoms tend to be the most detectable. Subjects are asked to rate each hangover symptom on a scale of 1-7 using four anchors: None (0), Mild (1), Moderate (4) and Incapacitating (7). The symptoms included are Hangover, Thirsty, Tired, Headache, Dizzyness/Faintness, Loss of appetite, Stomach ache, Nausea, and Heart racing.

Availability
The nine symptoms used in the scale are printed in the source reference.

Contact
Damaris Rohsenow, PhD<br>
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies<br>
Box G-BH, Brown University<br>
Providence, RI 02912 USA<br>
tel: 1-401-444-1843<br>
<a href="mailto:Damaris_Rohsenow@brown.edu">Damaris_Rohsenow@brown.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Acute Hangover Scale 576.pdf

SourceRef
Rohsenow DJ, Howland J, Minsky SJ, Greece J, Almeida A, Roehrs TA. The Acute Hangover Scale: A new measure of immediate hangover symptoms. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(6):1314-1320.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Acute+Hangover+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Acute Hangover Scale (AHS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200705

Year
2007

AdminScoring
The answer format for the nine items uses the scale 0-7 with four anchors: None (0), Mild (1), Moderate (4) and Incapacitating (7).

ValidRely
The AHS showed excellent internal consistency reliability the morning after alcohol. The AHS mean score and each item were significantly affected by beverage but not demographics or typical drinking, supporting validity.

Status
public

Population
College students
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AHS_inst




AccessNo
589

Name
Brief Alcohol Screening Instrument for Medical Care

Acronym
BASIC

Developer
Bischof, Gallus
Reinhardt, Susa
Grothues, Janina
Meyer, Christian
John, Ulrich
Rumpf, Hans-Jurgen

Description
This very brief questionnaire (6 items) screens for alcohol use disorders and for at-risk drinking. It combines items from different questionnaires, three items from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C) and three from the Lubeck Alcohol dependence and abuse Screening Test (LAST). It is a paper-and-pencil questionnaire that is sensitive enough to be implemented into daily routine care in general medical care settings. The first three questions deal with frequency of drinking ("How often do you have a drink containing alcohol?") and the last three deal with more emotional or interpersonal issues ("Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?" or "Does your wife, husband, a parent, or a relative ever worry or complain about your drinking?"). The BASIC appears to be a useful, brief screening instrument that performs better than the LAST and AUDIT-C and performs equally well compared with the AUDIT.

Availability
The single items from the BASIC (and their scoring) are listed in the source reference.

Contact
Gallus Bischof, PhD<br>
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Research Group S:TEP<br>
University of Lubeck<br>
Ratzeburger Allee 160<br>
23538 Lubeck, Germany<br>
<a href="mailto:gallus.bischof@ukl.uni-leubeck.de">gallus.bischof@ukl.uni-leubeck.de</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Brief Alcohol Screening Instrument for Medical Care 589.pdf (from source ref -- see "Discussion" for items and scoring values)

SourceRef
Bischof G; Reinhardt S; Grothues J; Meyer C; John U; Rumpf HJ. Development and evaluation of a screening instrument for alcohol-use disorders and at-risk drinking: The Brief Alcohol Screening Instrument for Medical Care (BASIC). Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 2007; 68(4):607-614.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2033%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test - Consumption Items (AUDIT-C)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20590%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Lubeck Alcohol Dependence and Abuse Screening Test (LAST)</a>

SourceInfo
Source reference.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200706

Year
2007

AdminScoring
Scoring instructions can be found in the source reference along with the screening items. Each possible answer for each question in the BASIC has a point value assigned to it. At the end of administration, the points are added up. The recommended cut-off value for identifying Alcohol Use Disorders or at-risk drinking is 2 points.

ValidRely
The BASIC has high sensitivity and specificity and can be administered very quickly.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BASIC_inst




AccessNo
590

Name
Lubeck Alcohol Dependence and Abuse Screening Test

Acronym
LAST

Developer
Rumpf, Hans-Jurgen
Hapke, Ulfert
Hill, Andreas
John, Ulrich

Description
A brief, but sensitive, screening questionnaire is important when tryin to detect patients with alcohol dependence or abuse in general hospitals or general practices. The CAGE, while short, is not particularly sensitive, and the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), while sensitive, is not particularly short. For this reason, the authors created the LAST, which combines items from the CAGE and the MAST, in order to create a more sensitive and useful brief screening tool. The LAST uses 7 items, which are answered either "yes" or "no." Items include questions such as "Are you always able to stop drinking when you want to?" and "Have you ever been told you have liver trouble? Cirrhosis?" This instrument revealed a higher sensitivity than CAGE, SMAST, and MAST in the first general hospital sample (see source reference), and appears to be a refined tool for use in general medical settings.

Availability
The 7 items in the LAST are printed in Table 1 of the source reference.

Contact
Hans-Jurgen Rumpf<br>
Department of Psychiatry<br>
Medical University of Luebeck<br>
Research Group For Substance Abuse and Dependence<br>
Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538<br>
Leubeck, Germany

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Lubeck Alcohol Dependence and Abuse Screening Test 590.pdf

SourceRef
Rumpf H; Hapke U; Hill A; John U. Development of a screening questionnaire for the general hospital and general practices. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1997;21(5):894-898.

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200707

Year
1997

AdminScoring
Each item in the LAST is answered with either a "yes" or a "no." Point values for each answer are assigned (see source reference for point values) and after administration, the total points are added up. A score of 2 points or higher is indicative of alcohol dependence or abuse.

ValidRely
The LAST detects 10-15% more patients with alcohol dependence or abuse compared to the CAGE. Compared with the SMAST, the LAST also demonstrated greater sensitivity in a general hospital sample, though not in a general practice setting (see source reference). The reliability of the LAST is as good as in the MAST and CAGE.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/LAST_inst




AccessNo
596

Name
Substances and Choices Scale

Acronym
SACS

Developer
Christie, Grant
Marsh, Reginald
Sheridan, Janie
Wheeler, Amanda
Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau
Black, Stella
Butler, Rachael

Description
The Substances and Choices Scale (SACS) is an adolescent alcohol and other drug (AOD) self-report instrument. The SACS is a brief, simple AOD instrument that is reliable, valid and acceptable to young people and their clinicians. It has utility in screening for problematic use and measuring outcome and change over time, and should enhance the identification and treatment of AOD difficulties in adolescents across a range of health settings.
<p>
The SACS has three sections. The first section records the number of occasions the young person has used a variety of substances in the last month. The second section measures both substance use related symptoms and substance related harm. Scoring this section yields the 'SACS difficulties score' from 0 to 20. This score can be used to screen or measure change through a treatment episode. The third section asks about tobacco use.

Availability
The SACS is free of charge and is accessible via the internet.

Contact
Grant Christie<br>
CADS Youth Service ‘Altered High’<br>
WDHB, Level 2, 409 New North Road<br>
Kingsland, Auckland 1021, New Zealand<br>
E-mail: <mailto:grant.christie@waitematadhb.govt.nz>grant.christie@waitematadhb.govt.nz</a>

InstURL
http://www.sacsinfo.com/docs/SACSClinical.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Substances and Choices Scale.pdf

SourceRef
Grant C ; Marsh R ; Sheridan J ; Wheeler A ; Suaalii-Sauni T ; Black S ; Butler R. The Substances and Choices Scale (SACS) - the development and testing of a new alcohol and other drug screening and outcome measurement instrument for young people. Addiction 2007; 102(9):1390-1398.

Resources
Substances and Choices Scale website: <a href="http://www.sacsinfo.com">http://www.sacsinfo.com</a>

RelatedInst
Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)

SourceInfo
Source abstract.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM

EntryDate
200708

Year
2007

AdminScoring
The SACS a one-page pencil and paper self-report questionnaire designed to be administered by health professionals who are working with young people aged 13-18 years. It takes about 5 minutes to complete. The scoring system for the ‘SACS difficulties scale’ item responses (not true, somewhat true, certainly true) is similar to the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), with weightings for each response scored 0, 1, 2, respectively. It can be used alone or with the SDQ; together, the two instruments will assist in identifying young people at risk and assessing their needs at first presentation in order to determine best treatment options. Most importantly the combination of tools can measure outcome as young people progress through the treatment process.

ValidRely
In the study by Grant et al 2007, reliability of the SACS was sound, with coefficient alpha 0.91 and 3-week test-retest correlation 0.88. Congruent validity coefficients of the SACS versus the CRAFFT and the POSIT were 0.79 and 0.91, respectively. A ROC curve demonstrated the SACS as having a predictive value of 92%. Repeat SACS scores in a treatment sample indicated that the SACS had utility in measuring change. Feedback from participants indicated that the SACS was highly acceptable.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SACS_inst




AccessNo
597

Name
International Personality Disorder Examination

Acronym
IPDE

Developer
Loranger, Armand W.
Sartorius, Norman
Andreoli, Antonio
Berger, Peter
Buchheim, Peter
Channabasavanna, S. M.
Coid, Bina
Dahl, Alv
Diekstra, Rene F. W.
Ferguson, Brian
Jacobsberg, Lawrence B.
Mombour, W.
Pull, Charles
Ono, Yutaka
Regier, Darrel A.

Description
The IPDE was developed within the Joint Program for the Diagnosis and Classification of Mental Disorders of the World Health Organization (WHO) and U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and provides a uniform approach for assessing personality disorders for both the DSM-IVTM and the ICD-10 classification systems. The interview is the most widely used of its kind and is the only personality disorder interview based on worldwide field trials. The IPDE Manual contains the interview questions to assess either the 11 DSM-IV or the 10 ICD-10 personality disorders. The two IPDE modules (DSM-IV and ICD-10) contain both a self-administered screening questionnaire and a semistructured interview booklet with scoring materials. In general, the self-administered screener is administered first, followed by the clinical interview if the screener's scores suggest a personality disorder may be present.<p>

Results from the IPDE Interview allow the examiner to assign a definite, probable, or negative diagnosis for each personality disorder. The IPDE Interview questions are arranged in a format that provides the optimal balance between a spontaneous, natural clinical interview and the requirements of standardization and objectivity. The questions are arranged in sections (e.g., Background Information, Work, Self, Interpersonal Relationships) with open-ended inquiries provided at the beginning of each section to enable a smooth transition from the previous section. For each IPDE Interview question, the corresponding personality disorder and the specific diagnostic criterion is identified with precise scoring guidelines. Also at least one criterion must have been present prior to age 25 years before that particular personality disorder can be diagnosed.<p>

The IPDE has proven to be a user-friendly and clinically meaningful tool for clinicians throughout the international psychiatric community. It has demonstrated interrater reliability and temporal stability that is roughly similar to instruments used to diagnose psychoses, mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders.

Availability
This instrument is copyright protected.. Available from Psychological Assessment Resources (PAR), Inc.:
<a href="http://www3.parinc.com/products/product.aspx?Productid=IPDE">http://www3.parinc.com/products/product.aspx?Productid=IPDE</a>. An introductory kit (manual, 25 questionnaires, scoring and answer sheets) costs $192.

Contact
PAR, Inc.<br>
tel: 800-331-8378

SourceRef
Loranger AW, Sartorius N, Andreoli A, Berger P, Buchheim P, Channabasavanna SM, Coid B, Dahl A, Diekstra RF, Ferguson B, et al. The International Personality Disorder Examination. The World Health Organization/Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration international pilot study of personality disorders.
Archives of General Psychiatry 1994; 51(3):215-24.

OtherRef
Verheul R ; Hartgers C ; Van den Brink W ; Koeter MW. The effect of sampling, diagnostic criteria and assessment procedures on the observed prevalence of DSM-III-R personality disorders among treated alcoholics. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 1998; 59(2):227-36.
Echeburua E ; de Medina RB ; Aizpiri J. Alcoholism and personality disorders: an exploratory study. Alcohol Alcohol 2005;40(4):323-6.
Driessen M ; Veltrup C ; Wetterling T ; John U ; Dilling H. Axis I and axis II comorbidity in alcohol dependence and the two types of alcoholism.
Alcoholism Clinical & Experimental Research 1998; 22(1):77-86.

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

Recommended
APA Handbook

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200708

Year
1994

Notes
Source ref is located in ADAI rp 09256

AdminScoring
The IPDE Screening Questionnaire is a self-administered form that contains 77 DSM-IV or 59 ICD-10 items written at a 4th-grade reading level. The patient responds either True or False to each item and can complete the questionnaire in 15 minutes or less. The clinician then scores the screener and, if the results suggest presence of a personality disorder, proceeds with the clinical interview (which takes about an hour to administer).

Status
public

Population
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IPDE_inst




AccessNo
598

Name
Current Opioid Misuse Measure

Acronym
COMM

Developer
Butler, Stephen F.
Budman, Simon H.
Fernandez, Katherine C.
Houle, Brian
Benoit, Christine
Katz, Nathaniel
Jamison, Robert N.

Description
Clinicians recognize the importance of monitoring aberrant medication-related behaviors of chronic pain patients being prescribed opioid therapy. The COMM is a brief (17 items), self-report measure of current aberrant drug-related behavior, and may serve as a useful tool for those providers who need to document their patients' continued compliance and appropriate use of opioids for pain. The COMM is designed to address ongoing medication misuse by asking patients to describe how they are currently using their medication. Each question asks the relative frequency of a thought or behavior over the past 30 days from "0 = never" to "4 = very often." Thoughts or behaviors asked about include, "How often have you had trouble with thinking clearly or had memory problems?", "How often have you been in an argument?", "How often have you been worried about how you are handling your medications?", and "How often have you taken your medications different from how they are prescribed?" The scale uses a low cut-off score in order to over-identify misuse, rather than to mislabel someone as responsible when they are not; thus, this scale will result in false positives, however the authors believe it is better to identify patients who have only a possibility of misuse than to fail to identify those who are actually actively abusing their medication. Ideally, the results of the COMM can serve as an educational tool for patients and providers, and should not be used to deny care but rather to make appropriate decisions about the best ways to manage chronic pain.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Stephen F. Butler<br>
Inflexxion, Inc.<br>
Newton, MA 02464<br>
tel: +1-603-673-1317<br>
<a href="mailto:sfbutler@inflexxion.com">sfbutler@inflexxion.com</a>

InstURL
http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content//SMA12-4671/SMA12-4671.pdf#page=71

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Current Opioid Misuse Measure 598.pdf

SourceRef
Butler SF ; Budman SH ; Fernandez KC ; Houle B ; Benoit C ; Katz N ; Jamison RN. Development and Validation of the Current Opioid Misuse Measure. Pain 2007; 130:144-156

OtherRef
Jamison R, Katz N, Budman S, Fernandez K, Benoit C, Butler S. Cross validation of COMM-scale to monitor chronic pain patients. J Pain 2007; 8(4 suppl 1):S68.
Meltzer EC, Rybin D, Saitz R, Samet JH, Schwartz SL, Butler SF, Liebschutz JM. Identifying prescription opioid use disorder in primary care: Diagnostic characteristics of the Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM). Pain 2011;152(2):397-402
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT). Managing Chronic Pain in Adults With or in Recovery From Substance Use Disorders. (CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) series 54 ; DHHS Pub. No. (SMA) 12-4671). Rockville : Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2012.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20466%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire (PDUQ)</a>
<a href="http://bit.ly/POTQ_inst">Prescription Opioid Therapy Questionnaire</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200708

Year
2007

InstURLHost
CSAT TIP 54

Notes
The 17 items of the COMM are listed in Table 2 of the Source Ref. Source ref is in the reprint file.

AdminScoring
Each of the 17 questions asks the relative frequency of a thought or behavior over the past 30 days from "0=Never" to "4=Very Often." Thus, instead of identifying character and personality traits based on past history, the COMM is mostly interested in current behaviors and cognition. The low COMM cut-off score was selected to over-identify misuse.

ValidRely
The 17 items of the COMM were found to have good reliability and adequate validity in identifying which chronic pain patients currently on long-term opioid therapy would show evidence of medication misuse or abuse.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/COMM_inst




AccessNo
599

Name
Worry-Reduction Alcohol Expectancy Scale

Acronym
WRAES

Developer
Smith, Joshua P.
Tran, Giao Q.

Description
This 20-item measure assesses beliefs about the ability of alcohol consumption to reduce or diminish worry. It features a series of statements about the effects of alcohol and asks respondents to answer based on their personal thoughts, feelings, or beliefs about the effects of alcohol using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree). Statements, grouped into two subscales (Daily Living and Health/Safety) include, "When I drink, it is easier to 'let go' of my worries," "When I drink, my worrying about minor hassles is less intense," and "When I have had a stressful day, alcohol helps me to stop worrying." While the initial psychometric results of this scale are encouraging, studies are needed to test the instrument's ability to identify worriers at risk for developing drinking problems, its ability to predict drinking behaviors and consequences, and its sensitivity to treatment outcome.

Availability
A copy of the WRAES can be found in Appendix A of the source reference.

Contact
Joshua P. Smith<br>
Department of Psychology<br>
University of Cincinnati, College of Arts and Sciences<br>
PO Box 210376<br>
Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0376<br>
tel: 513-556-5663<br>
<a href="mailto:smijp@email.uc.edu">smijp@email.uc.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Worry Reduction Alcohol Expectancy Scale 599.pdf [from source ref]

SourceRef
Smith JP, Tran GQ. Development and initial validation of the Worry-Reduction Alcohol Expectancy Scale. Addict Behav 32(1):2383-2390, 2007.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20WRAES%20/%20Worry+Reduction+Alcohol+Expectancy+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Addiction Severity Index (ASI)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200709

Year
2007

AdminScoring
Total score is derived by summing the items.

ValidRely
Evaluation of this instrument's psychometrics showed a Cronbach's alpha of .96 and a test-retest correlation of r=.75. In addition, the difference between the mean correlation of the WRAES and convergent measures (r=.48) and the mean correlation of the WRAES and discriminant measures (r=.37) was statistically significant. Overall, the initial psychometric results are encouraging. For details, see source reference above.

Status
public

Population
Adults
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/WRAES_inst




AccessNo
601

Name
Cannabis Abuse Screening Test

Acronym
CAST

Developer
French Monitoring Center for Drug and Drug Addictions (OFDT)

Description
This six-item scale screens for different aspects of harmful cannabis use by assessing the frequency of the following events throughout an individual's lifetime (never, rarely, sometimes, quite often, and often): seemingly non-recreational use (smoking alone or before midday), memory disorders, being encouraged to reduce or stop using cannabis, unsuccessful attempts to quit, and problems linked to cannabis consumption. The reference period is the individual's entire life (it is designed for adolescents or young adults). This screener takes approximately five minutes to administer. This scale was drawn up by the OFDT (the French Monitoring Center for Drug and Drug Addictions), based on a review of existing subject material (Reynaud, 2002), and follows recommendations laid out by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA). It has been used since 2002 as part of the ESCAPAD survey, which is sent out annually by the OFDT.

Availability
The six items in the CAST (in English) are printed on page 236 of the Legleye S et al, 2007 reference. They are also available in French here: <a href="http://afdet.online.fr/formation/france/Questionnaire/Cannabis_CAST.doc">http://afdet.online.fr/formation/france/Questionnaire/Cannabis_CAST.doc</a>, as well as in the Beck F et al 2004 reference.

Contact
OFDT (Observatoire Francais des Drogues et des Toxicomanies)<br>
<a href="http://www.ofdt.fr/">http://www.ofdt.fr/</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Cannabis Abuse Screening Test 601.pdf [from Legleye S 2007 ref, see bulleted items]

SourceRef
Reynaud M. Usage nocif de substances psychoactives. La documentation francaise, 2002. [This is the review the OFDT used to develop the CAST]

OtherRef
Beck F; Legleye S; Spilka S. Drogues a l'adolescence. Niveaux et contextes d'usage de cannabis, alcool, tabac et autres drogues a 17-18 ans en France - ESCAPAD 2003. OFDT, 2004. Available (in French) online at: <a href="http://www.ofdt.fr/ofdtdev/live/publi/rapports/rap04/epfxfbka.html">http://www.ofdt.fr/ofdtdev/live/publi/rapports/rap04/epfxfbka.html</a>.
Legleye S; Karila L; Beck F; Reynaud M. Validation of the CAST, a general population Cannabis Abuse Screening Test. Journal of Substance Use 2007;12(4):233-242
Reynaud M; Karila L; Chinet L; Allen JP; Streel E; Pelc I. Original strategies of screening, evaluation, and care of adolescent substance abuse. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2005;29(7):1264-1267.
Legleye S; Piontek D; Kraus L. Psychometric properties of the Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST) in a French sample of adolescents. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2011;113(2-3):229-235.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Cannabis+Abuse+Screening+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST)</a>

SourceInfo
Legleye S 2007 ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200709

Year
2007

AdminScoring
Positive response thresholds vary from question to question. The threshold is set at "sometimes" for the first two questions (smoking before midday or alone), as they do not screen problems but frequencies of use in some contexts; and at "rarely" for the others. An individual's final score can therefore be from 0 to 6. A score of four or above indicates problematic cannabis use.

ValidRely
The CAST appears to be unidimensional and have high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.81). Among cannabis users who are low alcohol consumers, CAST presents very high sensitivity and specificity compared with the POSIT. The CAST seems to be an efficient tool in order to screen for cannabis use disorders among adolescents and young adults. (See Legleye et al, 2007 for details.)

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CannabisAST_inst




AccessNo
602

Name
Brief Sensation Seeking Scale

Acronym
BSSS

Developer
Hoyle, Rick H.
Stephenson, Michael T.
Palmgreen, Philip
Lorch, Elizabeth Pugzles
Donohew, R. Lewis

Description
The BSSS is a self-report measure of sensation seeking, a dispositional risk factor for various problem behaviors, including substance abuse. It is an abbreviated and revised 8-item form of Form V of the Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS-V; Zuckerman, Eysenck & Eysenck, 1978) and is intended for use with adolescents and young adults. In the BSSS, each of the four primary dimensions of sensation seeking (experience seeking, boredom susceptibility, thrill and adventure seeking, and disinhibition) is represented by two items. Responses are indicated on five-point Likert scales labeled from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree."
<p>In one study (Hoyle et al 2002), sensation seeking as measured by the BSSS was a particularly strong predictor of the intention to try marijuana in the future. A four-item version of the scale (the BSSS-4) is also available (see Vallone et al, 2007).

Availability
This scale can be found online at the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Service (CHIPTS) site: <a href="http://chipts.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2012/02/Brief-Sensation-Seeking-Scale_BSSS_.pdf">http://chipts.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2012/02/Brief-Sensation-Seeking-Scale_BSSS_.pdf</a>. The items in the scale can also be found in Table 1 of the source reference.

InstURL
http://chipts.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2012/02/Brief-Sensation-Seeking-Scale_BSSS_.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Brief Sensation Seeking Scale 602.pdf

SourceRef
Hoyle RH; Stephenson MT; Palmgreen P; Lorch EP; Donohew RL. Reliability and validity of a brief measure of sensation seeking. Pers Indiv Differences 2002;32:401-414.

OtherRef
Stephenson MT; Velez LF; Chalela P; Ramirez A; Hoyle RH. The reliability and validity of the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-8) with young adult Latino workers: implications for tobacco and alcohol disparity research. Addiction 2007;102(Suppl 2):79-91.
Vallone D; Allen JA; Clayton RR; Xiao, H. How reliable and valid is the Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS-4) for youth of various racial/ethnic groups? Addiction 2007;102(Suppl 2):71-78.
Stephenson MT; Hoyle RH; Palmgreen P; Slater MD. Brief measures of sensation seeking for screening and large-scale surveys. Drug Alcohol Depend 2003;72:279-286. [<a href="http://public.wsu.edu/~fournier/Teaching/psych312/Lab2AlcoholandSensationSeeking/Alcohol_Sensation_Readings/Stephenson.pdf">free online</a>]

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20BSSS%20/%20Brief+Sensation+Seeking+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (BSSS)</a>

RelatedInst
Sensation Seeking Scale (Form V)

SourceInfo
Stephenson et al 2007; Vallone et al 2007; source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
NS, MB

EntryDate
200709

Year
2002

InstURLHost
UCLA CHIPTS

ValidRely
For English-speaking Latino participants, the BSSS factor structure was second-order unidimensional and correlated positively with life-time cigarette use, intention to smoke in the future and amount and frequency of alcohol consumption. For Spanish-speaking Latino participants, a four-subfactor solution for the BSSS provided the best fit to the data although correlations between the four subscales and cigarette use were small. (Stephenson et al, 2007)

<P>The BSSS-4 is a useful tool for identifying youth at risk for smoking; however, it is less reliable and valid for African American youth compared with other youth. Future research should investigate whether other existing sensation seeking scales are equally reliable and valid across race/ethnicity, and whether an alternative scale could or should be developed that would measure sensation seeking more effectively among African American youth. (Vallone et al, 2007)

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Hispanics

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BSSS_inst




AccessNo
603

Name
Erectile Dysfunction Medication Use Questionnaire

Acronym
EDMUQ

Developer
Horvath, Keith J.
Calsyn, Donald A.
Terry, Christeine
Cotton, Ann

Description
The EDMUQ is a 10-item questionnaire to determine how common erectile dysfunction medication use is among men seeking substance abuse treatment. A significant proportion of men and women in drug and alcohol treatment report experiencing a current sexual problem. Little is known about the association between drug use, erectile dysfunction medication use, and sexual functioning among heterosexual substance users. The items in the EDMUQ address three specific ED medications: Viagra, Levitra, and Cialis. Respondents are asked to report when they first used one of these medications, how many times they have used them in their lifetime, how many times in the last 90 days, and when they last took a dose. They are also asked how they obtained the medications (prescription, bought off the street or Internet, or given to them by a friend or acquaintance), and what effects the medications may have had on their sexual experiences.

Availability
Full-text of instrument is in the Source Ref (Horvath, 2007).

Contact
Keith J. Horvath<br>
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health<br>
University of Minnesota<br>
1300 South 2nd Street, Suite 300<br>
Minneapolis, MN 55454<br>
<a href="mailto:horva018@umn.edu">horva018@umn.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Erectile Dysfunction Medication Use Questionnaire 603.pdf

SourceRef
Horvath KJ ; Calsyn DA ; Terry C ; Cotton A. Erectile dysfunction medication use among men seeking substance abuse treatment. Journal of Addictive Diseases 2007;26(4):7-13.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20EDMUQ%20/%20Erectile+Dysfunction+Medication+Use+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Erectile Dysfunction Medication Use Questionnaire (EDMUQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200709

Year
2007

Notes
ADAI author (Calsyn)

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/EDMUQ_inst




AccessNo
605

Name
Drinking Styles Questionnaire

Acronym
DSQ

Developer
Smith, Gregory T.
McCarthy, Denis M.
Goldman, Mark S.

Description
The DSQ collects information about drinker/nondrinker status, the age one started to drink, typical frequency of drinking, quantity typically consumed, frequency of drunkenness (including proportion of times drinking leads to drunkenness), most alcohol consumed on any one occasion, and whether the respondent has experienced hangovers, nausea or vomiting, blackouts during drinking episodes, or has gotten into trouble with family members, friends, or the police because of drinking. This measure is useful in identifying individual differences in alcohol consumption and related problems in a general, nonidentified population. It was primarily developed for use in adolescents.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Gregory Smith, PhD<br>
Associate Professor<br>
Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky<br>
105 Kastle Hall<br>
Lexington, KY 40506-0044<br>
<a href="mailto:gsmith@uky.edu">gsmith@uky.edu</a><br>

ADAI
We don't have a copy of this scale (the source ref describes the items in the text, but doesn't completely describe the possible answers respondents can choose from). A PDF of the source reference can be found here:
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Articles\DSQ Smith McCarthy Goldman 1995.pdf

SourceRef
Smith GT; McCarthy DM; Goldman MS. Self-reported drinking and alcohol-related problems among early adolescents: Dimensionality and validity over 24 months. J Stud Alcohol 1995;56(4):383-394.

OtherRef
McCarthy DM; Thompsen DM. Implicit and explicit measures of alcohol and smoking cognitions. Psychol Addict Behav 2006;20(4):436-444.
McCarthy DM; Miller TL; Smith GT; Smith JA. Disinhibition and expectancy in risk for alcohol use : Comparing Black and White college samples. J Stud Alcohol 2002;62(3):313-321.
Anderson KG; Smith GT. Specificity in personality and cognitive factors associated with drinking and depressive symptoms. Cognitive Ther Res 2006;30(6):711-722
Aarons GA; Goldman MS; Greenbaum PE; Coovert MD. Alcohol expectancies: Integrating cognitive science and psychometric approaches. Addict Behav 2003;28(5):947-961

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DSQ%20/%20Drinking+Styles+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Drinking Styles Questionnaire (DSQ)</a>

SourceInfo
source ref and other refs.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200710

Year
1995

ValidRely
This measure has demonstrated good reliability and validity in adolescent and college-age samples. Confirmatory factor analysis yielded two separate factors: a Drinking/Drunkenness factor and an Alcohol-Related Problems factor. Test-retest reliability was 0.81 for the Alcohol-Related Problems factor and 0.89 for Drinking/Drunkenness.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DrinkingSQ_inst




AccessNo
610

Name
Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire

Acronym
DAQ

Developer
Love, Alix
James, Darren
Willner, Paul

Description
This scale, derived in part from the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges, is a multi-dimensional questionnaire that measures cravings and urges for alcohol. The DAQ contains 36 items, in four categories: intentions to drink alcohol (10 items), desires to consume alcohol (10 items), anticipation of positive outcomes from drinking (8 items), and anticipation of relief of negative affect or alcohol withdrawal (8 items). Items are rated on a 7-point Likert-type scale, and include statements such as "Drinking now would make the bad things in my life seem less bad," "All my tension would completely disappear if I drank now," "I want a drink so much I can almost taste it," and "I will have a drink now whatever gets in the way." <p>

An abbreviated 14-item version of the DAQ was developed by Clark et al in an unpublished manuscript, and is frequently used in research and clinical settings. These authors derived four factors from the longer version and selected 14 items that loaded highly on each dimension (cited in Love et al., 1998.) The four dimensions were labeled Desires and Intentions to Drink, Negative Reinforcement, Control Over Drinking, and Mild Desires to Drink. The abbreviated DAQ uses a 5-point scale —ranging from 1 = “not at all” to 5 = “strongly agree” — which was demonstrated to provide a more normal distribution of responses.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A list of the DAQ's items can be found in Table 2 of the Love, et al, source reference.

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire 610.pdf

SourceRef
Love A, James D, Willner P. A comparison of two alcohol craving questionnaires. Addiction 1998;93:1091-1102
Clark D, James N, Petry N, Exner A, Williams A, Norman P. The development and validation of a questionnaire on cravings and urges for alcohol (unpublished).

OtherRef
Franken Ingmar HA; Russo M; van Honk J. Selective memory for alcohol cues in alcoholics and its relation to craving. Cognitive Therapy and Research 2003;27(4):481-488.
Field M; Mogg K; Zetteler J; Bradley BP. Attentional biases for alcohol cues in heavy and light social drinkers: The roles of initial orienting and maintained attention. Psychopharmacology 2004;176(1):88-93.
Willner P; Darren J; Morgan M. Excessive alcohol consumption and dependence on amphetamine are associated with subjective ratings of both "wanting" and "liking." Addiction 2005;100(10):1487-1495.
Schulze D; Jones BT. Desire for alcohol and outcome expectancies as measures of alcohol cue-reactivity in social drinkers. Addiction 2000;95(7):1015-20.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DAQ%20/%20Desires+for+Alcohol+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire (DAQ)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20316%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Desires for Speed Questionnaire (DSQ)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20613%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref; other refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB, NS

EntryDate
200710

Year
1998

ValidRely
The DAQ's factor structure is stable in a reliability analysis. It has been found to have good reliability and validity.

Status
public

Population
Adults
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DAQ_inst




AccessNo
613

Name
Desires for Drug Questionnaire

Acronym
DDQ

Developer
Franken, Ingmar H. A.
Hendriks, Vincent M.
van den Brink, Wim

Description
The DDQ is an adaptation of the Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire (DAQ) (the 14-item version), redesigned to measure craving for heroin instead of alcohol. It assesses three dimensions of current ("now") craving: desire and intention to use heroin, negative reinforcement of heroin use and control of heroin use, with good reliability and concurrent validity. Items are rated on a Likert-type scale, and include statements such as, "I want heroin so much I can almost taste it," "My desire to use heroin now seems overwhelming," and "I would feel as if all the bad things in my life had disappeared if I used heroin now."

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scales 14 items can be found in Table 3 of the source reference.

Contact
Ingmar Franken, PhD<br>
Erasmus University Rotterdam<br>
Institute of Psychology<br>
Woudestein, T12-35<br>
PO Box 1738<br>
3000 DR Rotterdam<br>
The Netherlands<br>
tel: 010-408-9563<br>
<a href="mailto:franken@fsw.eur.nl">franken@fsw.eur.nl</a><br>
<a href="http://www.psyweb.nl/homepage/ingmar_franken.htm">http://www.psyweb.nl/homepage/ingmar_franken.htm</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Desires for Drug Questionnaire 613.pdf

SourceRef
Franken IHA; Hendriks VM; van den Brink W. Initial validation of two opiate craving questionnaires - The Obsessive Compulsive Drug Use Scale and the Desires for Drug Questionnaire. Addict Behav 2002;27(5):675-685

OtherRef
Marissen MAE; Franken IHA; Blanken P; van den Brink W; Hendriks VM. Cue exposure therapy for the treatment of opiate addiction: Results of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics 2007;76:97-105
Marrissen MAE; Franken IHA; Waters AJ; Blanken P; van den Brink W; Hendriks VM. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment. Addiction 2006;101:1306-1312.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20DDQ%20/%20Desires+for+Drug+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20610%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Desires for Alcohol Questionnaire (DSQ)</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20316%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Desires for Speed Questionnaire (DSQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref, other refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200710

Year
2002

ValidRely
This scale is easy to administer in clinical populations and is a reliable instrument for use in clinical trials on pharmacological or psychotherapeutic interventions aimed at reducing craving and relapse. More study on concurrent and predictive validity of the DDQ is needed, however.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/DesiresDQ_inst




AccessNo
614

Name
Western Personality Inventory (Manson Evaluation & Alcadd Test)

Acronym
WPI
ME
AT

Developer
Manson, Morse P.
Huba, George J.

Description
The WPI combines two alcohol-related assessment tests, the Manson Evaluation and the Alcadd Test. The Manson Evaluation is a widely used test (more than 350,000 administered, according to the Western Psychological Services web site), and is designed to identify individuals whose behavior and personality structure indicate they are alcoholics or have serious alcoholic problems, as well as to identify non-alcoholic individuals with personality characteristics often found in alcoholics and who may become alcoholics if placed under certain coniditions of stress. It measures seven personality characteristics: Anxiety, Depressive Fluctuations, Emotional Sensitivity, Resentfulness, Incompleteness, Aloneness, and Interpersonal Relations. Written at a fourth-grade reading level and administered to individuals or groups in just 5-10 minutes, the Manson Evaluation has high reliability and validity and can quickly identify individuals whose personality traits are similar to those found in alcoholics. It is an excellent instrument for personnel screening, diagnosis, therapy, research, and alcohol abuse programs.<p>
The Alcadd Test is an objective paper-and-pencil test designed to provide an object measurement of alcoholic addiction in order to identify individuals whose behavior and personality structure indicate they are alcohol addicts or have serious alcoholic problems, and also to identify specific areas of maladjustment in alcoholics to facilitate therapeutic and rehabilitation activities. It also yields Alcoholic Probability Index, which tells you how likely it is that the individual taking the test is a member of an alcoholic population. It is also easily administered in just 5-10 minutes. Like the Manson Evaluation, the Alcadd demonstrates high reliability and validity and is an excellent tool for diagnosis, therapy, and research.

Availability
The WPI can be purchased from Western Psychological Services for about US$105. Alternatively, the manuals for the Manson and Alcadd can be purchased separately for US$50 each. Additional purchasing information can be found at the WPS web site: <a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,69269&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL">http://portal.wpspublish.com/portal/page?_pageid=53,69269&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL</a>.

Contact
Western Psychological Services<br>
tel: 800-648-8857 <br>
<a href="mailto:customerservice@wpspublish.com">customerservice@wpspublish.com<br>
<a href="http://portal.wpspublish.com">http://portal.wpspublish.com</a>

SourceRef
Manson MP, Huba, GJ. The Manson Evaluation Manual, Revised Edition. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services, 1987.
Manson MP. The Alcadd Test: Manual of directions and norms. Los Angeles: Western. Psychological Services, 1965.

OtherRef
Brown NW; Rawls R; Collier TM. Use of the Western Personality Inventory in the identification of potential alcohol abusers. Alcohol Treat Q 1989;6(3/4): 189-198.
Dunlop T. The Alcadd Test: An extension of norms. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 1978;5(2).
Dunlop T. The Alcadd Test: Effects of response set. Alcohol and Alcoholism 1980;15(2): 78-82
Gubernachuk E; Brockman L. The Manson Evaluation as an indicator of heroin independence. British Journal of Addiction 1976;71(4):353-358.
Cuevas D. Psychoneurotic and psychopathic personalities of polydrug abusers and effects of didactic instruction. Adv Alcohol Subst Abuse 1990;9(3-4):65-79.

SourceInfo
other refs, WPS web site

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

Recommended
TIP 7

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200710

Year
prior to 1952

AdminScoring
The scales can be scored either by hand or using a computer.

ValidRely
Both the Manson Evaluation and Alcadd Test have demonstrated strong validity and reliability in numerous studies.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/WPI_inst




AccessNo
616

Name
Penn Inventory for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Developer
Hammarberg, Melvyn

Description
The Penn Inventory is a 26-item self-report measure that assesses DSM-IV symptoms of PTSD. It can be used with clients with multiple traumatic experiences because symptoms are not keyed to any particular traumatic event. The response format resembles that of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) by having respondents endorse one statement from a series of four scaled sentences that best describes the degree, frequency, or intensity of their feelings during the past week. Scores for each statements range from 0 to 3. The Penn does not assess all of the 17 DSM symptoms of PTSD and it includes items that are not directly related to DSM criteria (e.g., self-knowledge). The following is a sample item from the Penn Inventory (respondents are asked to circle the number next to the one statement that best describes their feeling). <p>
<ul>
<li>0 = I have not experience a major trauma in my life.
<li>1 = I have experienced one or more traumas of limited intensity.
<li>2 = I have experienced very intense and upsetting traumas.
<li>3 = The traumas I have experience were so intense that memories of them intrude on my mind without warning.</ul>
<p>
A score of 35 or above indicates the presence of PTSD. Because the items in the Penn Inventory for PTSD are not restricted to military experience, this scale shows some promise for bridging the gap between combat-related and civilian-related PTSD. It appears to function adequately as a clinical screening tool and is valid and reliable.

Availability
The complete Penn Inventory is available by writing to Melvyn Hammarberg at the University of Pennsylvania (see contact information below).

Contact
Melvyn Hammarberg, PhD<br>
Associate Professor of Anthropology<br>
University Museum<br>
325 University Museum, University of Pennsylvania<br>
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6398<br>
tel: 215-898-0981<br>
<a href="mailto:mhammarb@ccat.sas.upenn.edu">mhammarb@ccat.sas.upenn.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~mhammarb/">http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~mhammarb/</a>

SourceRef
Hammarberg M. Penn Inventory for posttraumatic stress disorder: Psychometric properties. Psychological Assessment 1992;4(1):67-76.

OtherRef
Harrington T ; Newman E. The psychometric utility of two self-report measures of PTSD among women substance users. Addictive Behaviors 2007;32(12):2788-2798.
Scragg P ; Grey N ; Lee D ; Young K ; Turner S. A brief report on the Penn Inventory for posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Traumatic Stress 2001;14:605-611.
Numaguchi G; Hill RD; Kircher JC; Allen SN. The effectiveness of the Penn Inventory for predicting posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology in female civilians. Traumatology 2002;8(2):42-53.

Resources
<a href="http://ncptsd.kattare.com/ncmain/ncdocs/assmnts/penn_inventory_for_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_penn_inventory.html">Department of Veterans Affairs page on the Penn Inventory</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Penn+Inventory%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Penn Inventory for PTSD</a>

SourceInfo
Other ref (Harrington, 2007); source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200711

Year
1992

AdminScoring
The participants select 1 of 4 sentences that best fits their experience. The Penn Inventory provides a continuous score that ranges from 0 to 78, calculated by summing the scale numbers of the sentences that range from 0 to 3. Elevated total Penn Inventory scores indicate greater distress (the source reference suggests that a score of 35 or above suggests a diagnosis of PTSD).

ValidRely
The Penn Inventory demonstrates adequate internal consistency, test-retest reliability, sensitivity and specificity. See source reference and other references for more details on the psychometrics of this scale.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Women
Veterans

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PIPSD_inst




AccessNo
627

Name
Health Dynamics Inventory

Acronym
HDI

Developer
Saunders, Stephen M.
Wojcik, James V.

Description
This relatively brief, easy-to-use, self-report questionnaire was developed to evaluate mental health functioning. It evaluates three aspects of mental disorders described in the DSM-IV: (1) the experience of emotional or behavioral symptoms that define mental illness, such as dysphoria, worry, angry outbursts, low self-esteem, or excessive drinking, (2) the level of emotional distress related to these symptoms, and (3) the impairment or problems fulfilling the major roles of one's life being exhibited. It comprises three major scales: Morale, Symptoms, and Impairment. The Morale scale uses four items that ask respondents to rate the level of their mental health, distress, contentment, and happiness. The Symptoms scale addresses seven issues (subscales): depression, anxiety, attention problems, substance use, unusual thoughts/experiences, eating/weight concerns, and behavioral problems. The Impairment scale addresses three: occupational/task impairment, relationship impairment, and self-care impairment. For each item, respondents are asked to consider their experiences during the previous 2 weeks (this time frame was chosen because it seems to maximize the likelihood that the person will recall and report problems relatively accurately). This scale is available in a self-report version for respondents aged 14 through adulthood, and for parents to complete on their 14-18 year olds. It takes approximately 10-15 minutes to administer and can be taken either on paper or computer.

Availability
This scale is available in two formats: self-report and parent. It is also available in American Spanish. The HDI is published by <a href="https://www.mhs.com/ecom/(rdw1b3v24rprfaiiuo141fbu)/product.aspx?RptGrpID=HDI">MultiHealth Systems (MHS)</a> and is copyright protected. A complete kit that includes both the self-report and parent-report versions of the HDI (both questionnaires and response forms), as well as the manual, can be purchased from MHS for $260. Items can also be purchased separately. The Psychological Assessments Australia web site provides examples of interpretive reports for both the parent and self-report versions; (see "Sample Reports" at the bottom): <a href="http://www.psychassessments.com.au/Category.aspx?cID=50#sample">http://www.psychassessments.com.au/Category.aspx?cID=50#sample</a>

Contact
Clinton Agius<br>
MultiHealth Systems<br>
<a href="clinton.agius@MHS.com">clinton.agius@MHS.com</a><br>
<a href="http://www.mhs.com/mhs/">http://www.mhs.com/mhs/</a>

ADAI
Sample "interpretive" reports for the Self Report and Parent versions of the HDI (from Psychological Assessments Australia, see Availability field for URL) -- include descriptions of all the items, plus scoring keys:
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Health Dynamics Inventory Self Report Sample Interpretive Report 627.pdf

G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Health Dynamics Inventory Parent Sample Interpretive Report 627.pdf

SourceRef
Saunders SM, Wojcik JV. Reliability and validity of a brief self-report questionnaire to screen for mental health problems: The Health Dynamics Inventory. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings;2004;11(3):233-241. [DOI: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jocs.0000037617.04463.e1">10.1023/b:jocs.0000037617.04463.e1]</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref, email from Jim Wojcik (December 10, 2007)

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200712

Year
2004

Notes
Author Jim Wojcik contacted ADAI about including this scale in our collection in December 2007. He also said he would ask their MHS representative if we could have a copy of the scale for our files (not to put online).

AdminScoring
The HDI was written to be easily understood by persons with varying degrees of education, disability, and disturbance; items use a nontechnical language and are written at a sixth-grade reading level. For each scale or subscale, a score is obtained by summing the values for each item in the group. For the Morale scale, responses indicating greater or more frequent distress have a value of 1, with responses indicating less distress rating a 5 (therefore, high Morale scale scores indicate greater morale, and vice versa). Higher scores on the Symptom item responses indicate more frequent or intense experiences of the symptom (range 1-5). Likewise, responses to the Impairment items work the same way (higher scores indicate more impairment, at a range of 1-4). If a response is "NA," the average of the other subscale scores is substituted.

ValidRely
Results suggest that the HDI is both reliable and valid. It has adequate psychometric properties and validity, which indicates that the items of the scales and subscales of the HDI are internally consistent. Reliabilities were generally acceptable, ranging between .69 to .95. The validity of the HDI is supported by the finding that patients scored more pathologically than nonpatients on all but a few items, on all three major scales, and on all of the subscales. For details on the psychometrics of this instrument, see the source reference (Saunders & Wojcik, 2004).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents
Children

Permalink
http://bit.ly/HDI_inst




AccessNo
639

Name
AC-Co-Occurring Disorder Screen

Acronym
AC-COD

Developer
Cherry, Andrew L.
Dillon, Mary E.
Hellman, Chan M.
Barney, L. D.

Description
The AC-COD is an integrated screening tool that identifies people with a possible co-occurring disorder who need to be fully assessed for a concurrent mental health and substance abuse disorder. The screen consists of 17 common behavioral health questions used in the fields of mental health, addiction, domestic violence and trauma. It is a screening tool that can be used during the intake process at many different types of human service agencies that takes less than five minutes to administer, and is easy to score and understand. It could be helpful for identifying people with a possible co-occurring disorder whether the person presents at a mental health facility, a substance abuse treatment facility, or at a shelter for victims of domestic violence. The screen could also be useful in jails and detention settings, in medical clinics, in emergency rooms and in other settings to determine if a person needed to be fully assessed for a co-occurring disorder.

Availability
The AC-COD Screen is a copyrighted scale. Commercial use of the AC-COD scale is prohibited. However, this screen is available without charge to researchers, clinicians and agencies serving people with a co-occurring disorder with the compliments of the authors. A copy can be downloaded from the website.

Contact
Andrew L. Cherry<br>
School of Social Work, University of Oklahoma<br>
4502 E. 41st Street, Ste. 3J08<br>
Tulsa, OK 74133<br>
<a href="mailto:alcherry@ou.edu">alcherry@ou.edu</a>

InstURL
http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/C/Andrew.L.Cherry-1.Jr/AC-CODscreen.htm

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\AC-Co-Occurring Disorder Screen 639.pdf

SourceRef
Cherry AL ; Dillon ME ; Hellman CM ; Barney LD. The AC-COD Screen: rapid detection of people with the co-occurring disorders of substance abuse, mental illness, domestic violence, and trauma. Journal of Dual Diagnosis 2007;4(1):35-53.

OtherRef
Cherry AL. Mixing oil and water: Integrating Mental Health and Addiction services to treat people with a co-occurring disorder. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction 2007; An Online First article by Springer pub. SpringerLink Date: 5-10-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11469-007-9074-8

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20AC+COD%20/%20AC+Co+Occurring+Disorder+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: AC-Co-Occurring Disorder Screen</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200802

Year
2007

InstURLHost
Andrew L. Cherry's Univ. of OK Faculty page

AdminScoring
The screen consists of 17 items; it is designed to be easily administered and requires little or no training to use. It takes less than five minutes to administer. A "yes" in any of the four problem areas would signal the need for an assessment in that area.

Status
public

Population
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AC-COD_inst




AccessNo
645

Name
Satisfaction With Life Scale

Acronym
SWLS

Developer
Diener, Ed
Emmons, Robert A.
Larsen, Randy J.
Griffin, Sharon

Description
The SWLS is a short 5-item instrument designed to measure global cognitive judgments of satisfaction with one's life. Among the various components of subjective well-being, the SWLS is narrowly focused to assess global life satisfaction and does not tap related constructs such as positive affect or loneliness. The five items are: "In most ways, my life is close to my ideal," "The conditions of my life are excellent," "I am satisfied with my life," "So far, I have gotten the important things I want in life," and "If I could live my life over, I would change almost nothing." Using a scale of 1-7 (1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree), respondents indicate their agreement with each statement.

Availability
This scale is in the public domain and can be used freely without permission as long as credit is given to the scale's authors. A copy of the scale and scoring instructions, as well as versions in French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, and numerous other languages, can be found on author Ed Diener's web site: <a href="http://www.psych.uiuc.edu/~ediener/SWLS.htm">http://www.psych.uiuc.edu/~ediener/SWLS.htm</a>.

Contact
Ed Diener, PhD<br>
Department of Psychology<br>
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign<br>
603 E. Daniel St.<br>
Champaign, IL 61820<br>
tel: 217-333-4804<br>
<a href="mailto:ediener@uiuc.edu">ediener@uiuc.edu</a>

InstURL
http://www.tbims.org/combi/swls/index.html

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Satisfaction with Life Scale 645.pdf

SourceRef
Diener E, Emmons RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S. The Satisfaction with Life Scale. Journal of Personality Assessment 1985;49:71-75.

OtherRef
Luty J, Arokiadass SM. Satisfaction with life and opioid dependence. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2008;3:2.
Pavot WG, Diener E, Colvin CR, Sandvik, E. Further validation of the Satisfaction with Life Scale: Evidence for the cross-method convergence of well-being measures. Journal of Personality Assessment 1991; 57: 149-161.
Pavot W, Diener E. Review of the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Psychological Assessment 1993;5: 164-172.
Pavot W, Diener E. The Satisfaction with Life Scale and the emerging construct of life satisfaction. Journal of Positive Psychology 2008;3(2):137-152.

SourceInfo
Ed Diener's web site, source and other refs

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200803

Year
1985

InstURLHost
Center for Outcome Measurement in Brain Injury

AdminScoring
For each item, respondents circle a number on a 7-point scale that most closely correlates with their agreement with each statement. Number values are then added up to derive the total score. A score of 30-35 is considered "Very High" (highly satisfied), 25-29 is "High," 20-24 is "Average," 15-19 "Slightly Below Average," 10-14 is "Dissatisfied," and 5-9 is "Extremely Dissatisfied." For more information on understanding the SWLS scores, see <a href="http://www.psych.uiuc.edu/~ediener/Understanding%20SWLS%20Scores.pdf">http://www.psych.uiuc.edu/~ediener/Understanding%20SWLS%20Scores.pdf</a>.

ValidRely
The SWLS is shown to have favorable psychometric properties, including high internal consistency and high temporal reliability. Scores on the SWLS correlate moderately to highly with other measures of subjective well-being, and correlate predictably with specific personality characteristics.

Status
public

Population
College students
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SWLS_inst




AccessNo
664

Name
Alcohol Perceived Risks Assessment

Acronym
APRA

Developer
Duthie, L.A.
Baer, John S.
Marlatt, G. Alan

Description
This 16-item measure asks college students to rate the likelihood that they will experience specific problems from drinking alcohol while at college. It takes less than 4 minutes to administer and can provide the professional with a glimpse into the student's own awareness of risks for problems from heavy drinking. Students rate each potential problem on a scale from 1 to 7, with 1 meaning they believe they are "Extremely Unlikely" to experience the problem, and 7 meaning they are "Extremely Likely." Items include actions such as, "Drive after drinking," "Miss class due to a hangover," "Argue, act bad, or do mean things after drinking," and "Develop a drinking problem."

Availability
A copy of this scale can be found on page 181 of the Dimeff, Baer, et al, 1999 book cited in Supporting References below. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
John S. Baer, PhD<br>
Department of Psychology<br>
University of Washington, Seattle<br>
tel: 206-768-5224<br>
<a href="mailto:jsbaer@uw.edu">jsbaer@uw.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Alcohol Perceived Risks Assessment 664.pdf

SourceRef
Duthie LA, Baer JS, Marlatt GA. High risk status and personal risk perception for alcohol problems among college students. Poster presented at the annual convention of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, New York, November 1991

OtherRef
Dimeff LA, Baer JS, Kivlahan DR, Marlatt GA. Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS): A Harm Reduction Approach. New York: Guilford Press, 1999.

SourceInfo
BASICS book and the scale itself

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200806

Year
1991

Status
public

Population
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/APRA_inst




AccessNo
667

Name
Adolescent Chemical Dependency Inventory

Acronym
ACDI

Developer
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd.

Description
The Adolescent Chemical Dependency Inventory (ACDI) is designed for use in schools, adolescent counseling and chemical dependency treatment programs for troubled youth. The ACDI contains 104 items, has a low 6th grade reading level and takes 15 to 20 minutes to complete. It consists of five measures (scales): (1) Truthfulness Scale: Measures the youth's openness and truthfulness while completing the test. It identifies defensiveness and reveals faking; (2) Alcohol Scale: Measures alcohol use, abuse and alcohol-related problems. Alcohol refers to beer, wine and other liquor; (3) Drug Scale: Measures drug use, abuse and drug-related problems. Drugs include marijuana, crack, cocaine, amphetamines, barbiturates and heroin; (4) Distress Scale: This scale incorporates anxiety and depression. These are the most common reasons for troubled youth counseling; (5) Adjustment Scale: Overall adjustment includes home, personal and school adjustment; quality of relationships and a problem-free lifestyle are incorporated.<p>
The ACDI screens important attitudes and behaviors so that subsequent interviews can focus on identified problem areas or concerns. The ACDI provides a meaningful profile of juvenile adjustment. Reports are available on-site within 3 minutes. Tests can be administered individually or in groups. Staff report writing, substantiation of decision making and record keeping needs are met with ACDI reports. Early problem identification facilitates prompt assistance and intervention. Objective and standardized assessment compares each client's results with thousands of peers. Demonstrated reliability, validity and accuracy provides a sound basis for decision making.<p>

A modified version of this scale, the ACDI-Corrections Version II, is also available and was designed for juvenile court, probation department, and drug court use. Version II includes an additional scale, the Violence (Lethality) Scale.

Availability
The ACDI is copyrighted and costs $8 per test (groups that need over 800 copies qualify for discounted pricing). The $8 fee includes test booklets, scoring materials, training manuals, and all other documentation. Test booklets are available in English and Spanish. The ACDI is also available in Windows-formatted test diskettes. These diskettes require a simple one-time computer setup procedure after which ACDI data (25 or 50 test applications) diskettes are used. For information on how to obtain this scale, visit the Behavior Data Systems web site: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsJ_ACDI.asp">http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsJ_ACDI.asp</a>.

Contact
Behavior Data Systems<br>
<a href="http://www.bdsltd.com">http://www.bdsltd.com</a>

OtherRef
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd. ACDI: An Inventory of Scientific Findings. Phoenix, AZ: Behavior Data Systems, Ltd., 1998. Available online: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF/TestsJ_ACDI_Sci.pdf">http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF/TestsJ_ACDI_Sci.pdf</a>.

SourceInfo
brochure sent to us by Sheryl Karca, Other Ref document above

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200806

Year
1988?

AdminScoring
The ACDI has 105 items and takes on average 15 to 20 minutes to complete. It is an automated (computer-scored) self-report test for juveniles’ (14 to 18 years) assessment.

ValidRely
Database analysis demonstrates that ACDI scales maintain very high reliability coefficients. All ACDI scales have alpha coefficients well above the professionally accepted standard of .75 and are highly reliable. All coefficient alphas are significant at the p<.001 level. Early validity studies used criterion measures and were validated with other tests, e.g., Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) L and F-Scales, 16PF, Treatment Intervention Inventory, MacAndrews, ACDI-Corrections Version II, Juvenile Profile, experienced staff ratings, etc. Detailed psychometric information can be found in the "ACDI: An Inventory of Scientific Findings" document listed in Other References.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ACDI_inst




AccessNo
668

Name
Substance Abuse Questionnaire

Acronym
SAQ

Developer
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd.

Description
The Substance Abuse Questionnaire (SAQ) is an adult substance (alcohol and other drugs) abuse assessment instrument or test that also assesses aggressiveness, resistance and stress handling abilities. The SAQ has 153 items, takes 25 to 30 minutes to administer, and reports are available on-site within 2½ minutes of test data input. The SAQ is an adult (male and female) automated (computer-scored) self-administered test. It has six measures or scales: 1) Truthfulness Scale, which measures how truthful the client was while completing the SAQ; 2) Alcohol Scale, which measures the client's alcohol proneness and problems; 3) Drugs Scale, which measures illicit drug use and severity of abuse; 4) Aggressiveness Scale, which measures the client's self-assertiveness, social dominance, and tendency to act out; 5) Resistance Scale, which measures the client's resistance, uncooperativeness, and defensiveness; and 6) Stress Coping Abilities Scale, which measures one's ability to cope effectively with tension, stress, and pressure. The SAQ is much more than just a test for alcohol and drug use or abuse. It also measures client truthfulness when tested along with client aggressiveness, resistance and stress handling abilities. Many of these important behaviors are missed by other tests.<p>

The SAQ can be used in adult court and probation department assessments, substance abuse screening, counseling/treatment intake screening, and agency, counseling, and professional mental health evaluations. A modified version of this scale, the SAQ-Adult Probation III, is also available and was designed for male/female probationer assessment. It includes an additional scale, the Violence (Lethality) Scale.

Availability
The SAQ is copyrighted and costs $8 per test (groups that need over 800 copies qualify for discounted pricing). The $8 fee includes test booklets, scoring materials, training manuals, and all other documentation. Test booklets are available in English and Spanish. The scale is also available in Windows formatted diskettes, which can be used to score the scale and print reports.

Contact
Behavior Data Systems<br>
<a href="http://www.bdsltd.com">http://www.bdsltd.com</a>

ADAI
(no copy of the scale available)

OtherRef
Davignon, Donald D. Substance Abuse Questionnaire Standardization Study. (Unpublished manuscript.) October 2002. Available online: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF/SAQ-Article-Web.pdf">http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF/SAQ-Article-Web.pdf</a>.

SourceInfo
brochure sent by Sheryl Karca; Other Ref resource above.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200806

ValidRely
Database analysis demonstrates that SAQ scales maintain very high reliability coefficients. All SAQ scales have alpha coefficients well above the professionally accepted standard of .75 and are highly reliable. All coefficient alphas are significant at the p<.001 level. Early validity studies used criterion measures and were validated with other tests like the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) L-Scale and F-Scale, 16PF, SAQ-Adult Probation III, Defendant Questionnaire, Taylor Manifest Anxiety, etc.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SubstAbQuest_inst




AccessNo
669

Name
Juvenile Substance Abuse Profile

Acronym
JSAP

Developer
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd.

Description
The Juvenile Substance Abuse Profile (JSAP) is designed for troubled youth (male and female) assessment in juvenile courts, screening programs, school systems and treatment agencies. The JSAP has 116 items and takes 20 minutes to complete. It has 5 measures (scales): 1) Truthfulness Scale, which measures how truthful the juvenile was while completing the JSAP; 2) Alcohol Scale, which measures the client's alcohol proneness and problems; 3) Drugs Scale, which measures illicit drug use and severity of abuse; 4) Aggressiveness Scale, which measures how outgoing, bold, and self-assertive the juvenile is; and 5) Stress Coping Abilities Scale, which measures the youth's ability to handle stress (high scores, at or above the 90th percentile, indicate the presence of identifiable emotional or mental health problems).

Availability
The JSAP is copyrighted and costs $8 per test (groups that need over 800 copies qualify for discounted pricing). The $8 fee includes test booklets, scoring materials, training manuals, and all other documentation. Test booklets are available in English and Spanish. The scale is also available in Windows formatted diskettes, which can be used to score the scale and print reports. For information on the scale and how to obtain it, see the Behavior Data Systems web site: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsJ_JSAP.asp">http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsJ_JSAP.asp</a>.

Contact
Behavior Data Systems<br>
<a href="http://www.bdsltd.com">http://www.bdsltd.com</a>

ADAI
(no copy of the scale available)

SourceInfo
bdsltd web site; Other Ref resource above.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200806

ValidRely
Database analysis demonstrates that JSAP scales maintain very high reliability and validity coefficients. All SAQ scales have alpha coefficients well above the professionally accepted standard of .75 and are highly reliable. All coefficient alphas are significant at the p<.001 level. Several troubled youth studies used several validation methods. Early studies used criterion measures and were validated with other tests like the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) L-Scale and F-Scale, 16PF, Treatment Intervention Inventory-Juvenile, ACDI-Corrections Version II, etc.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/JSAP_inst




AccessNo
670

Name
Gambler Addiction Index

Acronym
GAI

Developer
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd.

Description
The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) is a test specifically designed for gambler assessment. The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) has 166 items and takes 35 minutes to complete. It is computer-scored with reports printed within 3 minutes on-site. The Gambler Addiction Index (GAI) is standardized on gamblers (male and female) ranging in age from 17 to 75 years of age. It contains 7 separate scales (measures): 1) Truthfulness Scale, measures how truthful the client was while completing the GAI; 2) Gambler Severity Scale, measures gambling interest and involvement on a continuum from normal to pathological; 3) Suicide Scale, identifies suicide-prone individuals; 4) Alcohol Scale, measures alcohol use and abuse; 5) Drugs Scale, measures illicit drug use and abuse; 6) DSM-IV Gambling Scale, identifies pathological gamblers according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria; and 7) Stress Coping Abilities Scale, measures how well the gambler copes with stress, tension, and pressure.

Availability
The GAI is copyrighted and costs $8 per test (groups that need over 800 copies qualify for discounted pricing). The $8 fee includes test booklets, scoring materials, training manuals, and all other documentation. Test booklets are available in English and Spanish. The scale is also available in Windows formatted diskettes, which can be used to score the scale and print reports. For information on the scale and how to obtain it, see the Behavior Data Systems web site: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsA_GAI.asp">http://www.bdsltd.com/TestsA_GAI.asp</a>.

Contact
Behavior Data Systems<br>
<a href="http://www.bdsltd.com">http://www.bdsltd.com</a>

ADAI
(no copy of the scale available)

OtherRef
Behavior Data Systems, Ltd. Gambler Addiction Index: An Inventory of Scientific Findings. Unpublished manuscript. Available online: <a href="http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF%5CTestsA_GAI-sci.pdf">http://www.bdsltd.com/PDF%5CTestsA_GAI-sci.pdf</a>

SourceInfo
bdsltd web site; Other Ref resource above.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200806

ValidRely
Database analysis demonstrates that GAI scales maintain very high reliability and validity coefficients. All GAI scales have alpha coefficients well above the professionally accepted standard of .75 and are highly reliable. All coefficient alphas are significant at the p<.001 level. Several troubled youth studies used several validation methods. Early studies used criterion measures and were validated with many other tests, e.g., Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) L-Scale and F-Scale, MacAndrews, experienced staff ratings, etc. Much of this research is summarized in the document titled "GAI: An Inventory of Scientific Findings" (see Other References, above).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/GAI_inst




AccessNo
677

Name
Children of Alcoholics Screening Test - Short Form

Acronym
CAST-6

Developer
Hodgins, David C.
Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor
El-Guebaly, Nady
West, Malcolm

Description
The CAST-6 is a shortened version of the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test. This short-form version was developed by identifying a subset of the 30 original CAST items that discriminated between adult children of alcoholics and nonalcoholics across a range of samples. Items in the CAST-6 include questions like, "Have you ever thought that one of your parents had a drinking problem?" or "Did you ever feel like hiding or emptying a parent's bottle of liquor?" Subjects answer either "yes" or "no" to each item, with a score of either 2 or more (liberal) or 3 or more (conservative) yes answers indicating subject's parent may have been a "problem drinker." The shorter format of the CAST-6 allows clinicians and researchers to concentrate assessment and measurement efforts on other areas of interest while quickly identifying adult children of alcoholics.

Availability
Copyright is unknown. The items of the CAST-6 are available in Table 3 of the Source Ref (Hodgins, 1993) and in the Appendix of Other Ref (Hodgins, 1995).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Children of Alcoholics Screening Test Short Form 677.pdf

SourceRef
Hodgins CD; Maticka-Tyncale E; El-Guebaly N; West M. CAST-6: Development of a short-form of the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test. Addictive Behaviors 1993;18:337-345.

OtherRef
Hodgins DC; Shimp L. Identifying adult children of alcoholics: methodological review and a comparison of the CAST-6 with other methods. Addiction 1995;90(2):255-267.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20499%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Children of Alcoholics Screening Test (CAST)</a>

SourceInfo
Hodgins, 1995.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200807

Year
1993

ValidRely
The CAST-6 has been confirmed as a useful brief screening measure, and is shown to be internally reliable and to have good retest reliability.

Status
public

Population
Children of alcoholics

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAST-6_inst




AccessNo
678

Name
Prescription Opioid Misuse Index

Acronym
POMI

Developer
Knisely, Janet S.
Wunsch, Martha J.
Cropsey, Karen L.
Campbell, Eleanor D.

Description
This 6-item interview is focused specifically on prescription opioid use behaviors. It was developed and used in a larger study designed to assess correlates of OxyContin abuse in pain patients prescribed OxyContin, patients treated for OxyContin addiction, and individuals incarcerated for OxyContin-related charges. The original 8-item POMI included questions regarding dose, frequency of use, the need for early refills, a doctor expressing concern of misuse, feeling high from the medication, taking medication due to stress, obtaining prescriptions from multiple physicians, and pain control. It also included a question regarding adequate pain relief to confirm that any increase in prescription use reported was not due to inadequate pain control. This question was initially added to elucidate behaviors characterstic of those individuals displaying pseudo-addiction, which occurs in a patient with unrelieved pain who becomes focused on obtaining medications and displays behaviors that may otherwise seem inappropriate "drug seeking." After the principal component analysis, however, this item and one other (the one about whether or not a doctor had expressed concern) were removed from the final version of the scale.<p>


The POMI appears to be a sensitive and specific instrument for identifying patients who misuse opioid medications, however additional research needs to be done to increase the generalizability of the findings.

Availability
The POMI is printed in Appendix A of the source article (Knisely et al 2008).

Contact
Martha Wunsch, MD<br>
1457 Harding Road<br>
Blacksburg, VA 24060<br>
tel: 540-239-7132<br>
<a href="mailto:mwunsch@vcom.vt.edu">mwunsch@vcom.vt.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Prescription Opioid Misuse Index 678.pdf

SourceRef
Knisely JS, Wunsch MJ, Cropsey K:, Campbell ED. Prescription Opioid Misuse Index: A brief questionnaire to assess misuse. J Subst Abuse Treat 2008;35(4):380-386. doi:10.1016/j.jsat.2008.02.001

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, MB

EntryDate
200808

Year
2008

AdminScoring
An affirmative answer to more than one question classifies an individual as an opioid misuser with high sensitivity and specificity.

ValidRely
In the source reference study (Knisely et al, 2008), 21 of 34 chronic pain patients (61.7%) met DSM-IV criteria for opioid abuse or dependence; however, 11 of 21 (52.3%) who met criteria were not classified as at risk for misuse based on the POMI score. In addition, 100% of those subjects who were known to have addiction problems were correctly classified as at risk for misuse. Thus, the POMI is believed to be a sensitive and specific way of identifying patients who misuse opioid medications.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Offenders

Permalink
http://bit.ly/POMI_inst




AccessNo
683

Name
Sydney Laval Universities Gambling Screen

Acronym
SLUGS

Developer
Blaszczynski, Alex
Ladouceur, Robert
Moodie, Crawford

Description
The Sydney Laval Universities Gambling Screen is a brief screening instrument for use in assessing impaired control, severity of harm and self-reported need for treatment for problem gambling. The brief screen contains seven items. It measures the level of subjective harm experienced by a respondent without reference to levels of expenditure or nature of that harm. The primary purpose of the screen is to determine the number of gamblers who report impaired control (putative pathological gamblers), problem gamblers gambling more time or money than can be afforded resulting in harm that may require intervention, and those who express a desire for treatment. The SLUGS is designed for use in epidemiological studies that will provide information on the number of self-identified problem and pathological gamblers and data on which realistic estimates of the need for service provision can be extracted.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The seven items of the scale can be found in the Source Ref (Blaszczynski, 2008).

Contact
Alex Blaszczynski<br>
School of Psychology F12<br>
University of Sydney<br>
Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia<br>
<a href="mailto:alexb@psych.usyd.edu.au">alexb@psych.usyd.edu.au</a>

SourceRef
Blaszczynski A ; Ladouceur R ; Moodie C. The Sydney Laval Universities Gambling Screen: preliminary data. Addiction Research & Theory 2008;16(4):401-411.

RelatedInst
South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS)

SourceInfo
Source Ref (Blaszczynski, 2008)

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200810

Year
2008

AdminScoring
Respondents are given seven items that contain a definition of the construct under measure, and are required to provide a response on a visual analogue scale with anchor points ranging from zero (never/minimal) to 100 (always/extreme).

Status
public

Population
College students
Gamblers
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SLUGS_inst




AccessNo
694

Name
Quick Drinking Screen

Acronym
QDS

Developer
Sobell, Linda Carter
Agrawal, Sangeeta
Sobell, Mark B.
Leo, Gloria I.
Young, Lisa Johnson
Cunningham, John A.
Simco, Edward R.

Description
This brief screening instrument contains four questions about drinking: (1) On average in the last 12 months, how many days per week did you drink? (2) When you did drink, on average, how many standard drinks would you have had in a day? (3) How many times in the past 12 months have you had 5 or more standard drinks on one occasion? (4) In the past 12 months, what was the greatest number of standard drinks you consumed in one day? Although the QDS does not provide detailed drinking information (e.g. patterns), it might be a preferred measure in particular situations, such as telephone screenings, gathering follow-up data when clients do not want to spend much time in an interview, etc. The QDS appears to be an expedient measure ideal for gathering summary drinking data both at assessment and at follow-up.

Availability
The items in the QDS are listed in the Description field above.

Contact
Linda C. Sobell, PhD, ABPP<br>
Center for Psychological Studies, Nova Southeastern University<br>
3301 College Ave.<br>
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314<br>
<a href="mailto:sobelll@nova.edu">sobelll@nova.edu</a>

SourceRef
Sobell LC, Agrawal S, Sobell MB, Leo MI, Young LJ, Cunningham JA, Simco ER. Comparison of a Quick Drinking Screen with the Timeline Followback for individuals with alcohol problems. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 2003;64(6):858-861

OtherRef
Roy M, Dum M, Sobell LC, Sobell MB, Simco ER, Manor H, Palmerio. Comparison of the Quick Drinking Screen and the Alcohol Timeline Followback with outpatient alcohol abusers. Substance Use & Misuse 2008;43(14):2116-2123
Dum M ; Sobell LC; Sobell MB; Heinecke N; Voluse A; Johnson K. A Quick Drinking Screen for identifying women at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Addictive Behaviors 2009;34(9):714-16.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20QDS%20/%20Quick+Drinking+Screen%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Quick Drinking Screen (QDS)</a>

RelatedInst
Timeline Followback (TLFB)

SourceInfo
Source ref, other ref.

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200901

Year
2003

ValidRely
When it is not necessary or possible to gather detailed daily drinking data, the QDS produces reliable brief summary measures of drinking.

Status
public

Population
Pregnant women
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/QDS_inst




AccessNo
699

Name
National Opinion Research Center DSM-IV Screen for Gambling Problems

Acronym
NODS
NODS-CLip

Developer
Gerstein, Dean
Hoffman, John
Larison, Cindy
Engelman, Laszlo
Murphy, Sally
Palmer, Amanda
Chuchro, Lucian
Toce, Marianna
Johnson, Robert
Buie, Tracy
Hill, Mary Ann
Volberg, Rachel
Harwood, Henrick
Tucker, Adam
Christiansen, Eugene
Cummings, Will
Sinclair, Sebastian

Description
The NODS is a brief self-report measure of gambling behavior. It is a 17-item measure that was developed specifically to assess the DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling. In the parent study (see source reference, below), the researchers began by administering four questions addressing gambling history to serve as screening items. Individuals who report ever having lost $100 or more in a day were then administered the 17-item NODS. These items address the 10 DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for pathological gambling: Preoccupation, Tolerance, Withdrawal, Loss of Control, Escape, Chasing, Lying, Illegal Acts, Risked Significant Relationship, and Bailout. They are scored using a a yes-no format.<p>

A shortened, 3-item screening version of this scale was developed in 2009, the NODS-CLiP. It uses the three lifetime items from the NODS: Loss of Control (Have you ever tried to stop, cut down, or control your gambling?), Lying (Have you ever lied to family members, friends or others about how much you gamble or how much money you lost on gambling?), and Preoccupation (Have there been periods lasting 2 weeks or longer when you spent a lot of time thinking about your gambling experiences, or planning out future gambling ventures or bets?). Psychometric examination of the NODS-CLiP found it to be highly sensitive, which tended to yield many false positives (about 7 for every 8 screened), possibly due to its focus on "lifetime" behaviors. It might, however, be useful for researchers and others who simply want to identify the most problem gamblers possible, without care for false positives.

Availability
The NODS is available on various Internet sites, including on page 18 of the source reference (available free online here: <a href="http://www2.norc.org/new/gamb-fin.htm">http://www2.norc.org/new/gamb-fin.htm</a>, which includes details of the development of this scale. The Arizona Office of Problem Gambling has a copy of both the NODS and NODS CLiP, as well as several other gambling tools, available for download: <a href="http://www.problemgambling.az.gov/screeningtools.htm">http://www.problemgambling.az.gov/screeningtools.htm</a>. Copyright information is unknown.

InstURL
http://www.problemgambling.az.gov/TAP_PDF/nods.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\National Opinion Research Center DSM-IV Screen for Gambling Problems 699.pdf

SourceRef
Gerstein D; Hoffman J; Larison C; et al. Gambling Impact and Behavior Study: Report to the National Gambling Impact Study Commission. Chicago: National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, 1999. Free online: <a href="http://www2.norc.org/new/gamb-fin.htm">http://www2.norc.org/new/gamb-fin.htm</a>.

OtherRef
Wickwire EM, Jr; Burke RS; Brown SA; Parker JD; May RK. Psychometric evaluation of the National Opinion Research Center DSM-IV Screen for Gambling Problems (NODS). American Journal on Addictions 2008;17(5):392-395.
Hodgins DC. Using the NORC DSM Screen for Gambling Problems as an outcome measure for pathological gambling: psychometric evaluation. Addictive Behaviors 2004;29:1685-1690.
Stinchfield R; Givini R; Frisch GR. A review of screening and assessment instruments for problem and pathological gambling. IN: Smith G; Hodgins DC; Williams R (eds.). Research and Measurement Issues in Gambling Studies. New York: Academic Press, 2007; pp. 179-213.
Toce-Gerstein, M., Gerstein, D., & Volberg, R. The NODS-CLiP: A rapid screen for adult pathological and problem gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies 2009;25(4):541-555.
[no author cited] BBGS vs. NODS-CLiP: Which brief screen for pathological gambling wins the battle of psychometrics? The Water 2009;14(6). Free online: <a href="http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html">http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html</a>

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20NODS%20/%20DSM+IV+Screen+for+Gambling+Problems%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: National Opinion Research Center DSM-IV Screen for Gambling Problems (NODS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref and other refaces., NODS-CLiP info taken from the Wager article, 2009 (no author cited), in Other References.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200901
200908

Year
1999

InstURLHost
Arizona Office of Problem Gambling

AdminScoring
Total scores can range from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating more gambling problems.

ValidRely
The test-retest reliability of the NODS was found to be highly reliable. It also appears to have strong internal consistency and validity.

Status
public

Population
Gamblers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/NODS_inst




AccessNo
711

Name
Maternal Substance Abuse Checklist

Acronym
MSAC

Developer
Coles, Claire D.
Kable, Julie A.
Drews-Botsch, Carolyn
Falek, Arthur

Description
The MASC is a cumulative index designed to help identify women at risk for having a child with alcohol-related neurological disorders. The MASC consists of 17 "yes/no" items about heavy alcohol consumption, maternal age, smoking, and other indicators of problem drinking, as well as deleritous medical or social consequences of drinking.

Availability
A copy of the scale's 17 items can be found in the appendix of the source reference.

Contact
Claire D. Coles, PhD<br>
Director, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Drug Exposure Center<br>
Marcus Autism Center<br>
1920 Briarcliff Rd.<br>
Atlanta, GA 30329-4010<br>
tel: 404-785-9400

SourceRef
Coles CD, Kable JA, Drews-Botsch C, Falek A. Early identification of risk for effects of prenatal alcohol exposure. J Stud Alcohol 2000;61(4):607-616

OtherRef
Chiodo LM, Janisse J, Delaney-Black V, Sokol RJ, Hannigan JH. A metric of maternal prenatal risk drinking predicts neurobehavioral outcomes in preschool children. Alcohol Clin Exper Res 2009;33(4):634-644.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MSAC%20/%20Maternal+Substance+Abuse+Checklist%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Maternal Substance Abuse Checklist (MSAC)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, MB

EntryDate
200904

Year
2000

AdminScoring
Each item marked "yes" is scored as one point.

Status
public

Population
Pregnant women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MSAC_inst




AccessNo
714

Name
NIDA-Modified Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test
NIDA Quick Screen

Acronym
NM ASSIST

Developer
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Description
NMASSIST is screening tool for drug use in general medical settings. Also called NIDA Quick Screen, it is a web-based interactive tool that guides clinicians through a short series of screening questions and, based on the patient's responses, generates a substance involvement score that suggests the level of intervention needed. The tool also provides links to resources for conducting a brief intervention and treatment referral, if warranted.

<p>This screening instrument, a modified version of the World Health Organization's Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), is appropriate for patients age 18 or older. It can be completed by either a clinician or the patient using an online form or a printed version of the instrument, and is easily scored. It provides information about the substances people have ever used in their lifetime, the substances used in the last three months, problems related to substance use, risk of current or future harm, dependence, and injecting drug use.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain. The scale itself, plus additional materials such as a Quick Reference Guide, and administration/scoring information can be found on the NIDAwebsite: <a href="http://www.drugabuse.gov/nidamed/screening/">http://www.drugabuse.gov/nidamed/screening/</a>.

Contact
National Institute on Drug Abuse<br>
tel: 301-443-1124<br>
<a href="mailto:information@nida.nih.gov">information@nida.nih.gov</a>

InstURL
http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/screening/nmassist.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\NIDA Modified ASSIST 714.pdf

SourceRef
WHO ASSIST Working Group. The Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST): development, reliability and feasibility. Addiction 2002;97:1183-1194. (Original ASSIST)

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2028%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST)</a>

SourceInfo
NIDA web site

InstrumentType
Screening
Clinician-administered interview
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200904

Year
2009

InstURLHost
National Institute on Drug Abuse

AdminScoring
The NIDA-Modified ASSIST can be delivered as an interview, or the <a href="http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/index.php">prescreen question</a> can be delivered aloud and the patient can complete the remaining questions as a written questionnaire. It is recommended that the person administering the screening review the sample script available at the NIDA web site (<a href="http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/resguide/screeningtool.html">http://www.nida.nih.gov/nidamed/resguide/screeningtool.html</a>) to introduce the screening process. This script offers helpful language for introducing what can be a sensitive topic for patients.<p>
For scoring, add up the scores received for Questions 1-6. This is the Substance Involvement (SI) score. Do not include the results from either Step 1 (Prescreen) or Question 7 in your SI score. The patient will receive an SI score for each substance endorsed, not a cumulative score. Use the resultant SI score to identify the patient's risk level: High risk=27+, Moderate risk=4-26, Lower risk=0-3.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/NMASSIST_inst




AccessNo
723

Name
RUFT-Cut

Developer
Kelly, Thomas M.
Donovan, John E.
Chung, Tammy
Bukstein, Oscar G.
Cornelius, Jack R.

Description
The RUFT-Cut is a 5-item screening instrument based on selected items from the AUDIT (2 items), CRAFFT (2 items), and CAGE (1 item), that shows promise in helping emergency department personnel quickly identify older adolescents who are in need of intervention or further evaluation. The RUFT-Cut questions are:
<p>
<li>Riding with an intoxicated driver
<li>being Unable to stop drinking
<li>Family, friends, health care worker showing concern
<li>getting into Trouble while drinking
<li>and feeling the need to Cut-down.

Availability
The five items can be found in the Description field above, as described in Kelly et al, 2009.

Contact
Thomas M. Kelly, PhD<br>
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic<br>
3811 O'Hara St.<br>
Pittsburgh, PA 15213<br>
<a href="mailto:kellytm@upmc.edu">kellytm@upmc.edu</a>

SourceRef
Kelly TM, Donovan JE, Chung T, Cook RL, Delbridge TR. Alcohol use disorders among ED-treated older adolescents: A new brief screen (RUFT-Cut) using the AUDIT, CAGE, CRAFFT, and RAPS-QF. Alcohol: Clin Exp Res 2004;28:746–753.

OtherRef
Kelly TM, Donovan JE, Chung T, Bukstein OG, Cornelius JR. Brief screens for detecting alcohol use disorder among 18-20 year old young adults in emergency departments: Comparing AUDIT-C, CRAFFT, RAPS4-QF, FAST, RUFT-Cut, and DSM-IV 2-Item Scale. Addict Behav 2009;34(8):668-674.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20RUFT+Cut%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: RUFT-Cut</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2032%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">AUDIT</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20346%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CRAFFT</a>
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2058%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">CAGE</a>

SourceInfo
source article (Kelly et al, 2004)

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
200906

Year
2004

AdminScoring
Two items use a 5-point scale and the other three use a 0-1 scale. The RUFT-Cut was most efficient at a cut-score of 3 in the original study (see Kelly et al, 2004).

ValidRely
The RUFT-Cut performed as well as the full scale AUDIT (sensitivity = 82%, specificity = 78%; K), and performed significantly better than the CAGE for identifying AUD and non-AUD participants. The RUFT-Cut was validated in a small sample, however, and these findings were considered preliminary (see Kelly et al, 2004). In the Kelly et al, 2009 study (see Other References), the RUFT-Cut did not perform well enough to justify its use with adolescents and young adults and may have performed satisfactorily in the 2004 study due to the smaller sample and/or use of a different outcome variable (lifetime AUD rather than present focus on current AUD).

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RUFT-Cut_inst




AccessNo
726

Name
Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised

Acronym
SOAPP-R

Developer
Butler, Stephen F.
Budman, Simon H.
Fernandez, Katherine C.
Fanciullo, Gilbert J.
Jamison, Robert N.

Description
The Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain--Revised (SOAPP-R) is a self-report questionnaire designed to predict aberrant medication-related behaviors among persons with chronic pain. This measure was developed to complement current risk assessment practices and to improve a clinician's ability to assess a patient's risk for opioid misuse. The SOAPP-R is a revised version of the SOAPP v.1. It contains 24 items rated from 0="never" to 4="very often." The items are summed to create a total score. It should only be used with chronic pain patients being considered for long-term opioid therapy.

Availability
The list of SOAPP-R questions is available in the Source Ref (Butler, 2009).

Contact
Stephen Butler, PhD<br>
320 Needham Street, Suite 100<br>
Newton, MA 02464-1594 U.S.A.<br>
<a href="mailto:sfbutler@inflexxion.com">sfbutler@inflexxion.com</a>

SourceRef
Butler SF; Budman SH; Fernandez KC; Fanciullo GJ; Jamison RN. Cross-validation of a screener to predict opioid misuse in chronic pain patients (SOAPP-R). Journal of Addiction Medicine 2009;3(2):66-73.

OtherRef
Weiner GS, Horton LC, Green TC, Butler SF. A comparison of an opioid abuse screening tool and prescription drug monitoring data in the emergency department. Drug Alcohol Depend 2016;159:152-7. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.12.007
Butler SF, Budman SH, Fernandez K, Jamison, RN. Validation of a screener and opioid assessment measure for patients with chronic pain. Pain 2004;112, 65-75.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20ASI%20/%20SOAPP+R%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain--Revised (SOAPP-R)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20454%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain (SOAPP)</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref (Butler, 2009)

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200906

Year
2009

ValidRely
The SOAPP-R is a reliable and valid screening tool for risk of aberrant drug-related behavior among chronic pain patients.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SOAPP-R_inst




AccessNo
728

Name
Brief Individual Readiness for Change Scale

Acronym
BIRCS

Developer
Goldman, Gerri DeLong

Description
The 4-item BIRCS is intended to provide practitioners and program administrators with a brief screening tool to gauge quickly whether individuals providing services are prepared to implement research- or evidence-based practices. Instead of focusing on the recipients of the practice techniques as is more often found in current literature, the BIRCS focuses on the providers. It is based on the belief that the successful provision of any practice technique rests with those who provide the services, the individual practitioners, as shaped by their skills, resources, and beliefs. The ability to identify and ameliorate points of practitioner resistance prior to implementation of new techniques is a key to avoiding frustration, low staff morale, and poor outcomes. The BIRCS identifies four areas that might impact efforts to implement new practice techniques: (1) practitioners' beliefs about having the skills necessary to implement the technique, (2) believing there is flexibility to implement it, (3) beliving that necessary training resources are available, and (4) believing that the new technique will positively impact clients' outcomes. The four items are each rated on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree).

Availability
The five items of the BIRCS are listed in Table 1 of the source reference. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Gerri DeLong Goldman, PhD, LCSW, CAP<br>
College of Social Work<br>
Florida State University<br>
University Center, Building C<br>
Tallahassee, FL 32306<br>
<a href="mailto:gsg7929@fsu.edu">gsg7929@fsu.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Brief Individual Readiness for Change Scale 728.pdf

SourceRef
Goldman GD. Intial validation of a Brief Individual Readiness for Change Scale (BIRCS) for use with addiction program staff practitioners. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions 2009;9:184-203

SourceInfo
source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200906

Year
2009

AdminScoring
BIRCS items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale using values from 0 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). The mean score of the responses is used to interpret the results. The higher the mean score, the more strongly the individual attributes and beliefs are associated with readiness for change.

ValidRely
This scale functioned adequately in a study of its psychometrics (see source reference). The strength of the convergent construct validity item correlations provide preliminary support for the scale, however, additional work is needed to further strengthen the scale's overall performance.

Status
public

Population
Counselors
Clinicians
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BIRCS_inst




AccessNo
736

Name
Child Abuse Potential Inventory Form

Acronym
CAP

Developer
Milner, Joel S.

Description
The CAP Inventory was designed primarily as a screening tool for the detection of physical child abuse by protective services workers in their investigations of reported child abuse cases. It is a 160-item, reliable and valid objective self-report screening instrument that can assist protective services workers in making case decisions. The CAP Inventory contains a total of 10 scales. The primary clinical scale (Abuse) can be divided into six factor scales: Distress, Rigidity, Unhappiness, Problems With Child and Self, Problems With Family, and Problems With Others. In addition, the CAP Inventory contains three validity scales: Lie, Random Response, and Inconsistency.<p>

The CAP Inventory is appropriate for use as a preliminary screening tool when you wish to quickly screen a group of high-rish patients for a subgroup of individuals who are most likely to be at risk for physical child abuse, including those in treatment for substance abuse. Intervention/treatment programs have successfully used the CAP Inventory at pre- and post-treatment and on a follow-up basis to assist in program evaluation.

Availability
This scale is copyright protected and is available for purchased from PAR, Inc. The cost is $180 for an "introductory kit" that includes the manual, scoring forms, and ten inventory booklets. For purchase information, see: <a href="http://www3.parinc.com/products/product.aspx?Productid=CAP">http://www3.parinc.com/products/product.aspx?Productid=CAP</a>.

SourceRef
Milner JS. Assessing physical child abuse risk: The Child Abuse Potential Inventory. Clinical Psychology Review 1994;14:547-583

SourceInfo
http://www3.parinc.com/products/product.aspx?Productid=CAP

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200906

Year
1994

Notes
Per Betsy, this scale is being used as part of a CTN platform study looking at pregnant/parenting women with PTSD in substance abuse treatment.

AdminScoring
The CAP Inventory Form VI is a four-page test booklet with test items printed in large type for easy reading. Raw Score Summary Sheets provide a form for recording all the raw data generated from a client's CAP Inventory; Inconsistency Scale Scoring Sheets are used with the Inconsistency Scale Transparent Scoring Template to obtain an Inconsistency Scale Score.

ValidRely
Overall, the 77-item CAP Abuse scale has high internal consistency reliabilities (i.e., .92-.96 for controls and .95-.98 for abusers); temporal stability estimates for the abuse scale also are adequate (i.e., .91 and .75 for one-day and three-month intervals, respectively).

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CAP_inst




AccessNo
742

Name
Social Context of Cannabis Use Scale

Developer
Beck, Kenneth H.
Caldeira, Kimberly M.
Vincent, Kathryn B.
O'Grady, Kevin E.
Wish, Eric D.
Arria, Amelia M.

Description
The 24 items in the Social Context of Cannabis Use Scale, based on the Social Context of Drinking Scales-College Version (Beck et al., 1995), attempt to capture the variety of situations and reasons for using cannabis. Four subscales are identified as social facilitation, peer acceptance, emotional pain, and sex seeking. Respondents are asked to rate how often they use cannabis in or for a variety of situations or reasons using a scale from 0 (never) to 3 (frequently). Items include "With a small group of friends?," "While driving around?", "Because it's cool?", "To get rid of depression?", or "To build up courage to talk to someone of the opposite sex?" This scale may be useful as a screening tool for identifying students who may be at risk for cannabis use disorder, as well as those likely to become at risk for developing a problem in the future.

Availability
The wording of the 24 items in the scale can be found in Table 1 of the Source Ref (Beck, 2009).

Contact
Amelia M. Arria<br>
University of Maryland, Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)<br>
4321 Hartwick Rd., Suite 501<br>
College Park, MD 20740 U.S.A.<br>
tel: +1 301 405 9795<br>
<a href="mailto:aarria@cesar.umd.edu">aarria@cesar.umd.edu</a>

SourceRef
Beck KH; Caldeira KM; Vincent KB; O'Grady KE; Wish ED; Arria AM. The social context of cannabis use: Relationship to cannabis use disorders and depressive symptoms among college students. Addictive Behaviors 2009;34(9):764-768.

RelatedInst
The reliability and construct validity of the four subscalses were established.

SourceInfo
Source Ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200907

Year
2009

AdminScoring
Each item is followed by response options of "never" (scored as 0), "seldom" (scored as 1), "occasionally" (scored as 2), and "frequently" (scored as 3).

Status
public

Population
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SCCUS_inst




AccessNo
746

Name
Brief Bio-Social Gambling Screen

Acronym
BBGS

Developer
Gebauer, Line
LaBrie, R. A.
Shaffer, H. J.

Description
This instrument, used to screen for pathological gambling, was developed using past-year DSM-IV pathological gambling items from the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule IV (AUDADIS-IV). It offers three items: Withdrawal (During the past 12 months, have you become restless, irritable, or anxious when trying to stop/cut down on gambling?), Deceive (During the past 12 months, have you tried to keep your family or friends from knowing how much you gambled?), and Bailout/Need Money (During the past 12 months, did you have such financial trouble that you had to get help with living expenses from family, friends, or welfare?). Evaluations of the psychometrics of this screen show that it would work well in a clinical setting, where it has good specificity and high sensitivity.

Availability
The three items in this scale are printed in The Wager 2009 article freely available here: <a href="http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html">http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html</a>.

Contact
Line Gebauer<br>
<a href="mailto:gebauer@pet.auh.dk">gebauer@pet.auh.dk</a> or <a href="mailto:linegebauer@gmail.com">linegebauer@gmail.com</a>.

ADAI
(three items are listed in the description above)

SourceRef
Gebauer L, LaBrie RA, Shaffer HJ. Optimizing DSM-IV classification accuracy: A brief bio-social screen for gambling disorders among the general household population. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 2010;55(2):82-90.

OtherRef
[no author cited] BBGS vs. NODS-CLiP: Which brief screen for pathological gambling wins the battle of psychometrics? The Water 2009;14(6). Free online: <a href="http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html">http://www.basisonline.org/2009/08/wager-146-bbgs-vs-nodsclip-which-brief-screen-for-pathological-gambling-wins-the-battle-of-psychomet.html</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%2031%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule (AUDADIS)</a>

SourceInfo
The Wager article

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200908

Year
2009

Status
public

Population
Adults
Gamblers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/BBGS_inst




AccessNo
747

Name
Smoking Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices
Smoking Knowledge, Attitudes and Services

Acronym
S-KAP
S-KAS

Developer
Delucchi, Kevin L.
Tajima, Barbara
Guydish, Joseph

Description
The S-KAP is a 46-item instrument that measures smoking knowledge, attitudes, and practices among treatment providers. Lack of provider knowledge and training is a barrier to smoking cessation treatment, as are staff beliefs that smoking cessation is a risk to sobriety. Staff smoking is a third barrier to provision of smoking cessation treatment. These organizational barriers to smoking cessation intervention are measured in this instrument, and may be useful to treatment program administrators and others interested in changing organizational philosophy and practices related to smoking cessation. The S-KAP was developed as part of a National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) platform study, the "Addressing Tobacco through Organizational Change (ATTOC)" project, which implemented and tested a manualized intervention designed to support treatment programs in efforts to better address nicotine dependence. <p>

The S-KAP has five scales that address knowledge of smoking risks, attitudes toward treating nicotine dependence in the context of drug abuse treatment, counselor self-efficacy in providing such services, barriers to providing such services, and practices used to address smoking among clinic clients. Results from the Delucchi et al, 2009 study show that the S-KAP demonstrates reasonably good psychometric characteristics and will allow researchers to quantify staff knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding smoking cessation treatments and issues.<p>

In 2010, the developers created another version of this scale, the S-KAS, aimed at use with clients in addiction treatment settings. It asks clients to rate 29 statements about Knowledge (of smoking risks), Attitudes (about smoking cessation), Clinician Services (about the client's clinician), and Program Services (about available services at the client's program). This scale has reasonably good psychometric properties and also offers a client analogue to the S-KAP. Staff and client surveys could be used independently, or used in tandem to reflect similar constructs among staff and clients in the same program.

Availability
For the S-KAP: Table 4 in the Source Reference (Delucchi, 2009) contains the survey items and response codes in the five scales. For the S-KAS: A copy of the scale items and response codes can be found in Table 2 of the Source Reference (Guydish et al, 2010)

Contact
Kevin L. Delucchi, PhD<br>
Professor, University of California, San Francisco<br>
tel: 415-476-4180<br>
<a href="mailto:kdelucchi@lppi.ucsf.edu">kdelucchi@lppi.ucsf.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Smoking Knowledge Attitudes and Practices 747.pdf
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Smoking Knowledge Attitudes and Services 747.pdf

SourceRef
Delucchi KL; Tajima B; Guydish J. Development of the Smoking Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices (S-KAP) instrument. Journal of Drug Issues 2009; 39(2):347-364.
Guydish JR, Tajima BM, Chan M, Delucchi KL, Ziedonis DM. Measuring Smoking Knowledge, Attitudes and Services (S-KAS) among clients in addiction treatment. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2011;114(2-3):237-41.

OtherRef
Tajima B; Guydish J; Delucchi K; Passalacqua E; Chan M; Moore M. Staff knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding nicotine dependence differ by setting. Journal of Drug Issues 2009; 39(2):365-384.

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200908

Year
2009

Notes
Updated with K-SAS on 11/12/2010 (MB)

AdminScoring
Most of the 46 items use a Likert-type scale.

ValidRely
The five scales of the S-KAP have demonstrated face validity and internal consistency. (Cronbach's alpha for the scales ranged from .72 -.91; for details see the Delucchi et al, 2009 source reference.) The four scales of the S-KAS have also demonstrated good psychometric properties, though the knowledge scale "leaves room for improvement" (Guydish et al, 2010).

Status
public

Population
Smokers
Counselors

Permalink
http://bit.ly/S-KAP_inst




AccessNo
749

Name
Transmissible Liability Index
Non-Transmissible Liability Index

Acronym
TLI
NTLI

Developer
Kirisci, Levent
Tarter, Ralph
Mezzich, Ada
Ridenour, Ty
Reynolds, Maureen
Vanyukov, Michael

Description
The Transmissible Liability Index consists of a multidimensional selection of items that represent aspects of substance use disorder (SUD) risk shared with an SUD-affected parent, encompassing both genetic and environmental factors. The characteristics constituting the 45 items of the TLI are diverse, encompassing behavior, emotion, cognition, interpersonal adjustment, and daily routine. Items in this scale were drawn from a variety of established psychological and psychiatric questionnaires (including child self-report, mother informant reports, teacher informant reports, and several diagnostic interviews) and aggregated into conceptual domains. Items address the characteristics of the child prior to age 13, and ask such questions as, "Did you often annoy people on purpose to get even?", "[I/The Child] bites fingernails," "I move a great deal in my sleep," or "I sometimes worry I will not have enough to eat." <p>

A secondary version of the scale, the 62-item Non-Transmissible Liability Index (NTLI), is intended to account for the portion of the variance associated with SUD risk that is due to non-transmissible factors, such as family, peer, school, and neighborhood context. Items in the NTLI include questions such as, "How many things would you like to change about your mother?", "How often do you have a friendly chat with your dad?", " and "Do you know where people in your neighborhood or school get marijuana or other drugs?" Both the TLI and NTLI have been found to be effective at predicting cannabis use disorder by age 22 (with 75% accuracy) (Kirisci et al, 2009).

A college version of this scale has also been developed, see "Related Instruments" field for more information.

Availability
Items from both the TLI and the NTLI are available in the source reference. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Dr. Levent Kirisci<br>
University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy<br>
711 Salk Hall<br>
Pittsburgh, PA 15261<br>
<a href="mailto:levent@pitt.edu">levent@pitt.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Transmissible Liability Index 749.pdf
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Non-Transmissible Liability Index 749.pdf

SourceRef
Kirisci L; Tarter R; Mezzich A; Ridenour T; Reynolds M; Vanyukov M. Prediction of cannabis use disorder between boyhood and young adulthood: clarifying the phenotype and environtype. American Journal on Addiction 2009; 18(1):36-47.

OtherRef
Arria AM; Vincent KB; Caldeira KM. Measuring liability for substance use disorder among college students: implications for screening and early intervention. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 2009; 35(4):233-241.
Vanyukov MM; Kirisci L; Moss L; Tarter RE; Reynolds MD; Maher BS; Kirillova GP; Ridenour T; Clark DB. Measurement of the risk for substance use disorders: Phenotypic and genetic analysis of an index of common liability. Behavior Genetics 2009;39(3):233-244.
Conway KP; Levy J; Vanyukov M; Chandler R; Rutter J; Swan GE; Neale M. Measuring addiction propensity and severity: the need for a new instrument. [Review] Drug and Alcohol Dependence 2010;111(1-2):4-12.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20TLI%20/%20Transmissible+Liability+Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Transmissible/Non-Transmissible Liability Index </a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20752%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Transmissible Liability Index - College Version (TLI-CV)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref, Other ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200908

Year
2009

Status
public

Population
Children
Adolescents
Parents
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TLI_inst




AccessNo
752

Name
Transmissible Liability Index - College Version

Acronym
TLI-CV

Developer
Arria, Amelia M.
Vincent, Kathryn B.
Caldeira, Kimberly M.

Description
This 33-item scale is based on the Transmissible Liability Index (TLI), which consists of a multidimensional selection of items that represent aspects of substance use disorder (SUD) risk that are shared with an SUD-affected parent, encompassing both genetic and environmental factors. Items for the TLI-CV were derived from the College Life Study (CLS), an ongoing longitudinal study of college students at a single large public university in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. The scale includes items that address physical symptoms (feeling tired, e.g.), behavioral issues ("I hit someone when I really get mad," e.g.), conduct disorders ("Before you turned 18, how many times did you damage property on purpose?", e.g.), and personality questions ("I am an impulsive person," "I'm hard-headed and tough-minded in my attitudes," e.g.). The scale appears to be effective in identifying college students who may be at high risk for dependence on alcohol or marijuana.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found in Table 1 of the source reference.

Contact
Amelia M. Arria, PhD<br>
Associate Director<br>
Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR)<br>
University of Maryland<br>
4321 Hartwick Rd., Suite 501<br>
College Park, MD 20740<br>
<a href="mailto:aarria@cesar.umd.edu">aarria@cesar.umd.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Transmissible Liability Index - College Version 752.pdf

SourceRef
Arria AM, Vincent KB, Caldeira KM. Measuring liability for substance use disorder among college students: Implications for screening and early intervention. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 2009; 35:233-241

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20TLI+CV%20/%20Transmissible+Liability+Index+College+Version%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Transmissible Liability Index - College Version (TLI-CV)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20749%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Transmissible Liability Index (TLI) and Non-Transmissible Liability Index (NTLI)</a>

SourceInfo
Source reference

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200909

Year
2009

Status
public

Population
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/TLI-CV_inst




AccessNo
753

Name
Substance Use Risk Profile Scale

Acronym
SURPS

Developer
Woicik, Patricia A.
Conrod, Patricia J.
Pihl, Robert O.
Stewart, Sherry H.
Donigier, M.

Description
The Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) is based on a model of personality risk for substance abuse in which four personality dimensions (hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) are hypothesized to differentially relate to specific patterns of substance use. The SURPS is brief (23 items) and is intended for use in large epidemiological and longitudinal designs to facilitate research on the role of multiple personality traits in addictive behaviors and co-morbid psychopathology. The SURPS is typically administered in a paper/pencil or computerized format on which respondents indicate the extent to which they agree with statements about themselves by selecting one of four response options, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). Items include statements such as "I am content," "I would like to skydive," "It scares me when I am unable to focus on a task," or "I like doing things that frighten me a little."

Availability
The items in the SURPS can be found in Table 1 of the Woicik et al, 2009 article. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Patricia A. Woicik<br>
Department of Psychology, State University of NY at Stony Brook<br>
Stony Brook, NY<br>
<a href="mailto:pwoicik@bnl.gov">pwoicik@bnl.gov</a>

SourceRef
Woicik, P. A., Conrod, P. J., Phil, R. O., Stewart, S. H., & Dongier, M. The Drug Abuse Subtyping Scale: A revised instrument for identifying motivational profiles for substance abuse. Poster presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, Santa Barbara, California, 1999.

OtherRef
Ali A, et al. Risk factors for substances use and misuse among young people in France: What can we learn from the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale? Drug Alcohol Depend 2016;163:84-91. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.03.027
Memtovic J, et al. Examining the relationship between personality and affect-related attributes and adolescents' intentions to try smoking using the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale. Addict Behav 2016;56:36-40. [doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.01.002]
Woicik PA, Stewart SH, Pihl RO, Conrod PJ. The substance use risk profile scale: A scale measuring traits linked to reinforcement-specific substance use profiles. Addictive Behaviors 2009;34(12):1042-1055
Krank M; Stewart SH; O'Connor R; Woicik P; Wall A; Conrod PJ. Structural, concurrent, and predictive validity of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale in early adolescence. Addictive Behaviors 2011;36(1-2):37-46.

SourceInfo
Woicik et al 2009 article

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
200909

Year
1999

ValidRely
Results demonstrate support for the reliability and construct validity of the SURPS, and suggest that four personality dimensions may be linked to substance-related behavior through different reinforcement processes. For details on the psychometrics, see the Woicik et al, 2009 article.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SURPS_inst




AccessNo
755

Name
Gambling Craving Scale

Acronym
GACS

Developer
Young, Matthew M.
Wohl, Michael J.A.

Description
Craving to gamble consists of the anticipation of enjoyment from wagering as well as an expectation of relief from negative affect that would be derived from engaging in play. The GACS is a multidimensional measure of gambling-related craving. It is a 9-item scale with three factors (Anticipation, Desire, and Relief) that predict problem gambling severity, depression, and postive and negative affect. These three factors are moderately intercorrelated, suggesting that the GACS is composed of three related but meaningfully different factors of an underlying construct, namely, craving to gamble. As persistent gambling in the face of repeated loss is a defining characteristic of pathological gambling, the association between persistence and craving as measured by the GACS lends support to the predictive validity of this new scale. The GACS may be especially useful for treatment providers regarding the nature of patients' craving and it might help treatment providers understand the contexts that precipitate craving.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Matthew M. Young<br>
Department of Psychology<br>
Carleton University<br>
1125 Colonel By Dr., B550 Loeb Building<br>
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6<br>
<a href="mailto:mmyoung@connect.carleton.ca">mmyoung@connect.carleton.ca</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Gambling Craving Scale 755.pdf

SourceRef
Young MM; Wohl MJA. The Gambling Craving Scale: psychometric validation and behavioral outcomes. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2009; 23(3):512-522.
Young MM; Wohl MJ. "The Gambling Craving Scale: Psychometric validation and behavioral outcomes": Correction to Young and Wohl (2009). Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2009;23(4):563.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20GACS%20/%20Gambling+Craving+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Gambling Craving Scale (GACS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200909

Year
2009

AdminScoring
Participants respond to questions using a 7-point scale anchored at 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree).

ValidRely
The GACS demonstrated a high degree of concurrent validity as it was positively associated with problem gambling severity, problematic gambling-related cognitions, affect, and depression.

Status
public

Population
Gamblers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/GACS_inst




AccessNo
758

Name
Needle Fixation Profile

Acronym
NEFPRO

Developer
Pates, Richard M.
Arnold, K. A.
McBride, A. J.

Description
NEFPRO has been designed to be a clinical tool to help identify needle fixation in individuals and to pinpoint which aspects of needle fixation might be relevant to the injecting drug user (IDU). It is not designed to be a research tool, there is no relevance in a cumulative score, and the items have not been tested for independence. NEFPRO is a 10-item scale. Questions 1 and 6 are substitution questions, questions 2 and 4 relate to the experience of pain, and questions 7 and 9 are related to flushing. The other questions relate to sex, questions 3 and 5 where injecting is seen as arousing feelings of a sexual nature, and questions 8 and 10 to do with injecting as a sexual activity.

Availability
A copy of the scale is located in the Appendix of the Source Ref (Pates, Arnold, McBride, 2009). A 14-item version is available in the Appendix of the Other Ref (Pates and Gray, 2009).

Contact
R.M. Pates, Consultant Clinical Psychologist<br>
Richard Pates Associates Ltd<br>
42 King Street<br>
Cwm, Ebbw Vale<br>
Gwent NP23 7SQ, U. K.<br>
<a href="mailto:dr_pates23@hotmail.com">dr_pates23@hotmail.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Needle Fixation Profile 758.pdf

SourceRef
Pates RM; Arnold KA; McBride AJ. The identification of needle fixation: the development of the NEFPRO, a clinical screening tool. Journal of Substance Use 2009;14(5):306-311.

OtherRef
Pates RM; Gray N. The development of a psychological theory of needle fixation. Journal of Substance Use 2009;14(5):312-324.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20NEFPRO%20/%20Needle+Fixation+Profile%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Needle Fixation Profile (NEFPRO)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200911

Year
2009

AdminScoring
Each component of the scale has two questions which require a yes/no answer. If any of these are scored with positive answers, this will give an indication of whether the person is needle fixated. The more items with a positive response, the greater will be the evidence of needle fixation.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/NEFPRO_inst




AccessNo
759

Name
Risk of Alcoholic Relapse Scale

Acronym
RARS

Developer
Pedersen, Mads Uffe
Hesse, Morten

Description
The RARS was developed to help identify patients at high risk of relapse who need extra aftercare and support after treatment. The instrument uses items taken from the European version of the Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) and some basic demographic information. Variables examined by the RARS include standard units of alcohol per day; economic problems; treatment on the initiative of the clients, their families, or workplace; treatment paid for by the client and/or client's family; previous treatment for alcohol; prescribed psychopharmacological medicine; contemplation of suicide or suicide attempt; concerns about social problems/conflicts; need for help with physical problems. The RARS is an effective and easily administered tool for identifying potential risk of relapse after an inpatient treatment episode.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Dr. Mads Uffe Pedersen<br>
University of Aarhus, Center for Alcohol and Drug Research<br>
Nobelparken bygning 1453, Jens Chr. Skous Vej 3<br>
8000 Arhus C<br>
Denmark<br>
<a href="mailto:mup@crf.au.dk">mup@crf.au.dk</a>

ADAI
(No copy available)

SourceRef
Pedersen MU ; Hesse M. A simple risk scoring system for prediction of relapse after inpatient alcohol treatment. American Journal on Addictions 2009;18(6):488-493.

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20430%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
200911

Year
2009

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RARS_inst




AccessNo
761

Name
Canadian Problem Gambling Index

Acronym
CPGI

Developer
Wynne, Harold J.

Description
The Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI), was developed largely as a response to the criticism around the SOGS. The CPGI has been presented as a promising tool for use in problem gambling prevalence research. The scale as a whole contains 31 items (plus demographics) that cover gambling involvement, problem gambling assessment, and correlates of problem gambling. Only nine of those items are scored, and they comprise the <b>Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI)</b>, an index designed to serve both as a prevalence measure and a general population screen that is brief, reliable, and provides adequate estimates of the problem. The remaining items are indicators of gambling involvement (types of gambling activity, frequency of play, spending on gambling), and correlates of problem gambling that can be used to develop profiles of different types of gamblers or problem gamblers. The development of the CPGI was associated with an explicit rejection of a medicalized model of pathological gambling in favour of a view of problem gambling as a social issue with public health consequences. The CPGI is largely based on items in the SOGS and DSM-IV.

Availability
A copy of the Manual, including the instrument, is located on p. 44-54 of <a href="http://www.ccsa.ca/2003%20and%20earlier%20CCSA%20Documents/ccsa-008805-2001.pdf">McCready, 2006</a> (Other Ref)

Contact
Harold J. Wynne, PhD<br>
Wynne Resources<br>
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada<br>
780-488-5566<br>
<a href="mailto:hwynne@wynne.com">hwynne@wynne.com</a>

InstURL
http://www.ccsa.ca/2003%20and%20earlier%20CCSA%20Documents/ccsa-008805-2001.pdf

SourceRef
Ferris J, & Wynne HJ. The Canadian Problem Gambling Index: Final report. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, 2001.

OtherRef
Brooker IS, Ian P. Clara IP, Cox BJ. The Canadian Problem Gambling Index: Factor structure and associations with psychopathology in a nationally representative sample. Can J Behav Sci 2009;41(2):109 -114.
McCready J, Adlaf E. <a href="http://www.gamblingresearch.org/download.sz/CPGI%20Review%20%20Final%20Report%20English%20Web%20Version.pdf?docid=7974">Performance and enhancement of the Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI): Report and recommendations</a>. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, 2006.
Svetieva E; Walker M. Inconsistency between concept and measurement: The Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI). J Gambling Iss 2008;22:157-173.
Wynne HJ. <a href="http://www.gamblingresearch.org/download.sz/The%20CPGI%20V5%20-%20from%20Hal.pdf?docid=6446">Introducing the Canadian Problem Gambling Index</a>. Edmonton, AB: Wynne Associates, January 2003

RelatedInst
<http://www.problemgambling.ca/EN/ResourcesForProfessionals/pages/problemgamblingseverityindexpgsi.aspx">Problem Gambling Severity Index</a>

SourceInfo
Other Ref (Svetieva, 2008)

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
pm, ns

EntryDate
200912

Year
2001

Notes
http://www.ccsa.ca/Eng/Priorities/Gambling/CPGI/Pages/default.aspx

ValidRely
The CPGI produces superior statistical properties (such as reliability coefficients and estimates of specificity and a single factor loading) over other screens because that is what it was designed to do, and correlation with previous screens is a result of the fact that it is a derivative of previous screens.

Status
public

Population
Gamblers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CPGI_adai_inst




AccessNo
763

Name
Perceived Stigma of Addiction Scale

Acronym
PSAS

Developer
Luoma, Jason B
O'Hair Alyssa K.
Kohlenberg, Barbara S.
Hayes, Steven C.
Fletcher, Lindsay

Description
This 8-item scale was developed to measure the perceived stigma toward those with substance use problems. Perceived stigma has been shown in a number of studies to be a barrier to entering treatment for substance abuse. Respondents rate each item on a 7-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). Items include statements such as "Most people would willingly accept someone who has been treated for substance use as a close friend," and "Most employers will pass over the application of someone who has been treated for substance abuse in favor of another applicant."

Availability
The 8 items in the PSAS are printed in the source reference.

Contact
Jason B. Luoma, Ph.D.<br>
Department of Psychology/296<br>
University of Nevada, Reno<br>
Reno, NV 89577<br>
<a href="mailto:jbluoma@gmail.com">jbluoma@gmail.com</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Perceived Stigma of Addiction Scale 763.pdf

SourceRef
Luoma JB, O'Hair AK, Kohlenberg BS, Hayes SC, Fletcher L. The development and psychometric properties of a new measure of perceived stigma toward substance users. Subst Use Misuse 2010;45(1-2):47-57.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20ASI%20/%20Addiction%20Severity%20Index%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Perceived Stigma of Addiction Scale (PSAS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, mb

EntryDate
200912

Year
2010

ValidRely
This is a unidimensional measure with good face validity, reliability, and construct validity. Item-total correlations for the PSAS were all above 3. The alpha for this eight-item scale was .73, which is in the adequate range, especially for a short scale. The mean inter-item correlation for the eight items from the scale was r =.25.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PSAS_inst




AccessNo
765

Name
Autonomy Over Smoking Scale
Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale

Acronym
AUTOS

Developer
DiFranza, Joseph R.
Wellman, Robert J.
Ursprung, W. W. Sanouri A.
Sabiston, Catherine

Description
The Autonomy Over Smoking Scale was designed to study how smokers lose autonomy over smoking and regain it after quitting. It is a 12-item scale that shows excellent reliability. Asking about current symptoms only, it assesses the loss of autonomy over tobacco use in smokers of all ages, measuring symptom intensity and assessing cue-induced craving and self-perceived psychological dependence on cigarettes, which allows it to be used to evaluate and track the growth and resolution of symptoms. Questions are broken into three groups: withdrawal symptoms, psychological dependence, and cue-induced craving. This scale is also called the "Autonomy Over Tobacco Scale."

Availability
A copy of the scale is available in the Source Ref (DiFranza, 2009).

Contact
Joseph R. DiFranza<br>
Dept. of Family Medicine and Community Health<br>
University of Massachusetts Medical School<br>
55 Lake Ave.<br>
Worcester, MA 01655<br>
<a href="mailto:difranzj@ummhc.org">difranzj@ummhc.org</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Autonomy Over Smoking Scale 765.pdf

SourceRef
DiFranza JR; Wellman RJ; Ursprung WWSA; Samiston C. The Autonomy Over Smoking Scale. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 2009;23(4):656-665.

OtherRef
Wellman RJ, Di Franza

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Autonomy+Over+Smoking+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Autonomy Over Smoking Scale (AUTOS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
pm, mb

EntryDate
200912

Year
2009

AdminScoring
AUTOS is a Likert-type scale that has a single factor solution, is easily scored, and requires no training to administer.

Status
public

Population
Smokers
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/AUTOS_inst




AccessNo
766

Name
Problematic Use of Marijuana

Acronym
PUM

Developer
Okulicz-Kozaryn, K.

Description
This 8-item brief scale measures ICD-10 harmful use along with problems in interpersonal relationships and psycho-physical functioning. Reported by Piontek et al (2008), the PUM was found to have a good ability to discriminate between dependent and non-dependent individuals, correctly classifying at least 85% of cases. The PUM seems equally appropriate for males and females as well as for different age groups.

Availability
A copy of the PUM is available to download free in <a href="http://www.substanceabusepolicy.com/content/3/1/25">Piontek et al (2008)</a> -- see Appendix of that article. This version was translated from Polish into English by the original author.

Contact
Katarzyna Okulicz-Kozaryn<br>
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology<br>
Warsaw, Poland<br>
<a href="mailto:kokulicz@ipin.edu.pl">kokulicz@ipin.edu.pl</a>

InstURL
http://www.substanceabusepolicy.com/content/3/1/25

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Problematic Use of Marijuana 766.pdf [from Piontek et al 2008 ref, see Appendix]

SourceRef
Okulicz-Kozaryn K. Ocena psychometrycznych wlasciwosci testu "Problemowe uzywanie marihuany" (PUM) dla dorastajacych. Postepy Psychiatrii i Neurologii 2007, 16(2):105-111. <a href="http://journals.indexcopernicus.com/abstracted.php?icid=487952">English abstract</a>.

OtherRef
Piontek D, Kraus L, Klempova D. Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties. Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy 2008;3(25). [doi:10.1186/1747-597x-3-25] [<a href="http://www.substanceabusepolicy.com/content/3/1/25">read online</a>]
<a href="http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/html.cfm/index31435EN.html">Screening for problem or dependent cannabis use</a>, DrugNet Europe 58 (newsletter) on EMCCDA website.

Resources
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Problematic+Use+of+Marijuana%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
201001

Year
2007

InstURLHost
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy journal

ValidRely
Reported by Piontek et al (2008), the PUM shows an internal consistency of .92 in general population samples.

Status
public

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PUM_inst




AccessNo
770

Name
Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale

Acronym
MADRS

Developer
Montgomery, Stuart A.
Asberg, M.

Description
The Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) is a 10 item severity scale constructed to be sensitive to change with treatment of depression. It was designed to be sensitive for individual items and is therefore useful for measuring differential profiles of action. The scale may be used for any time interval between ratings, be it weekly or otherwise. It was developed from 65 original items from the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS, Asberg et al, 1978). The 10 items specifically deal with the treatment of depression, apparent sadness, reported sadness, inner tension, reduced sleep, reduced appetite, concentration difficulties, lassitude, an ability to feel pessimistic thoughts, and suicide. The scale is commonly used in drug treatment trials for both young and older patients.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found at the UCLA Mood Research program web site: <a href="http://www.moodresearch.com/resources/scales/depression/MADRS.pdf">http://www.moodresearch.com/resources/scales/depression/MADRS.pdf</a>.

InstURL
http://www.moodresearch.com/resources/scales/depression/MADRS.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale 770.pdf

SourceRef
Montgomery SA, Asberg M. A new depression scale designed to be sensitive to change. British Journal of Psychiatry 1979;134:382-9.

OtherRef
Burns AS, Lawlor BA, Craig S. Assessment Scales in Old Age Psychiatry (Assessment Scales in Psychiatry Series). Informa Healthcare, 2nd edition, 2004.

SourceInfo
Both references.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
1979

InstURLHost
UCLA Mood Research site

Notes
Included in the CTN Livelink Informatics CRF Library (Jan 2010)

AdminScoring
Points for each item are assigned as follows: 0 = no difficulties/normal; 2 = fluctuating/fleeting difficulties or feelings; 4 = continuous/pervasive feelings or thoughts; 6 or above = unrelenting/overwhelming feelings or thoughts. The rater must decide whether the rating lies on the defined scale step (0,2,4,6) or between them (1,3,5).

ValidRely
This scale has demonstrated satisfactory validity.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MADRS_adai_inst




AccessNo
773

Name
Marijuana Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist

Acronym
MWSC

Developer
Budney, Alan J.
Novy, Pamela L.
Hughes, John R.

Description
This 10-item scale uses items taken from previously published human laboratory studies of marijuana withdrawal. Participants rate each symptoms on a scale ranging from 0 (not at all) to 3 (severe). Symptoms include craving, irritability, nervousness, depression, anger, and strange dreams, and other demonstrated withdrawal symptoms.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Alan J. Budney, PhD<br>
Professor, Center for Addiction Research<br>
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences<br>
4301 West Markham St., Slot 843<br>
Little Rock, AK 72205<br>
tel: 501-526-7816<br>
<a href="mailto:ajbudney@uams.edu">ajbudney@uams.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Marijuana Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist 773.pdf [formatted for CTN use]

SourceRef
Budney AJ, Novy PL, Hughes JR. Marijuana withdrawal among adults seeking treatment for marijuana dependence. Addiction 1999;94:1311-1322

OtherRef
Preuss UW, Watzke AB, Zimmermann J, Wong JW, Schmidt CO. Cannabis withdrawal severity and short-term course among cannabis-dependent adolescent and young adult inpatients. Drug Alcohol Depend 2010;106(2-3):133-41.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MWSC%20/%20Marijuana+Withdrawal+Symptoms+Checklist%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Marijuana Withdrawal Symptoms Checklist (MWSC)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
1999

Notes
Copy retrieved from CTN Livelink Jan 2010

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MWSC_adai_inst




AccessNo
774

Name
Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale

Acronym
WSWS

Developer
Welsch, Samuel K.
Smith, Steven S.
Wetter, David W.
Jorenby, Douglas E.
Fiore, Michael C.
Baker, Timothy B.

Description
This 28-item scale was developed to contain reliable subscales tapping the major symptom elements of the nicotine withdrawal syndrome. It uses seven internally consistent subscales: anger, anxiety, sadness, concentration, sleep, hunger, and craving. Respondents rate each statement on a scale ranging from 0 (strong disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). Statements include, "Food is not particularly appealing to me," "I have had frequent urges to smoke," "I have been irritable," and "My sleep has been troubled." The WSWS is sensitive to smoking withdrawal and predictive of smoking cessation outcomes, and its brevity makes it useful in both the clinical and research context.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The 28 items in the scale can be found in the appendix of the source reference (Welsch et al, 1999).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale 774.pdf [formatted for CTN use]

SourceRef
Welsch SK, Smith SS, Wetter DW, Jorenby DE, Fiore MC, Baker TB. Development and validation of the Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 1999;7(4):354–361.

OtherRef
Castro Y; Kendzor DE; Businelle MS; Mazas CA; Cofta-Woerpel L; Cinciripini PM; Wetter DW. Structural and predictive equivalency of the Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale across three racial/ethnic groups. Nicotine and Tobacco Research 2011;13(7):548-555.
West R, Ussher M. Is the ten-item Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU-Brief) more sensitive to abstinence than shorter craving measures? Psychopharmacology 2010;208:427-432

SourceInfo
Source, other refs.

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
1999

Notes
Copy retrieved from CTN Livelink Jan 2010

AdminScoring
This scale has demonstrated good validity and internal consistency.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Smokers

Permalink
http://bit.ly/WSWS_adai_inst




AccessNo
776

Name
Life Events Checklist

Acronym
LEC

Description
The Life Events Checklist (LEC) is a brief, 17-item, self-report measure designed to screen for potentially traumatic events in a respondent's lifetime. The LEC assesses exposure to 16 events known to potentially result in PTSD or distress and includes one item assessing any other extraordinarily stressful event not captured in the first 16 items. For each item, the respondent checks whether the event (a) happened to them personally, (b) they witnessed the event, (c) they learned about the event, (d) they are not sure if the item applies to them, and (e) the item does not apply to them.<p>

The LEC was developed concurrently with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and is administered before the CAPS. The LEC has demonstrated adequate psychometric properties as a stand-alone assessment of traumatic exposure, particularly when evaluating consistency of events that actually happened to a respondent. The LEC has also demonstrated convergent validity with measures assessing varying levels of exposure to potentially traumatic events and psychopathology known to relate to traumatic exposure. However, the LEC does not establish that the respondent has experienced an event with sufficient severity to meet DSM-IV criteria for a traumatic exposure (Criterion A1), and it does not assess peritraumatic emotional experiences (Criterion A2).

Availability
A copy of the scale can be found in the Appendix of the Gray et al 2004 article above (other references).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Life Events Checklist 776.pdf [formatted for CTN use]

OtherRef
Gray MJ, Litz BT, Hsu JL, Lombardo TW. Psychometric properties of the Life Events Checklist. Assessment 2004;11:330-341. (<a href="http://www.ptsd.va.gov/PTSD/professional/articles/article-pdf/id26825.pdf">PDF online at VA web site</a>)

Resources
<a href="http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/life_events_checklist.asp">Department of Veterans Affairs page on the LEC</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://bit.ly/CAPS_inst">Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV</a>

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
1990

Notes
Copy retrieved from CTN Livelink Jan 2010

AdminScoring
Items in which the respondent endorsed that the event happened to them personally receive a score of 1; all other responses receive a score of 0. Item scores are summed for a total score.

ValidRely
The LEC appears to be characterized by generally adequate psychometric properties. For details on the psychometrics of this scale, see the Gray et al 2004 reference above (other references).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Veterans

Permalink
http://bit.ly/LEC_adai_inst




AccessNo
781

Name
Peer Delinquency Scale

Acronym
PDS

Developer
Loeber, Rolf

Description
The peer delinquency scale of the Pittsburgh Youth Study Interview comprises 15 questions rated on a 5-point scale (1 = none to 5 = all) concerning the number of friends of the subject that have engaged in a variety of antisocial and delinquent behaviors over the past 6 months. These behaviors range from skipping school without an excuse, to using weapons, lying or disobeying adults, damaging property, or using force to commit robbery.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. The scale is available in English and Spanish.

Contact
Rolf Loeber, PhD<br>
Pittsburgh Youth Study<br>
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry<br>
<a href="mailto:loeberr@upmc.edu">loeberr@upmc.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Peer Delinquency Scale 781.pdf [formatted for CTN Use]

SourceRef
Loeber R. Peer Delinquency Scale, Pittsburgh Youth Study, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1989.

OtherRef
Moss HB, Lynch KG, Hardie TL, Baron DA. Family functioning and peer affiliation in children of fathers with antisocial personality disorder and substance dependence: Associations with problem behaviors. Am J Psychiatry 2002;159:607-614
Kirillova G. Physical maturation, peer environment, and the ontogenesis of substance use disorders. Psychiatry Research 2008;158(1):43-53.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
1989

Notes
Copy retrieved from CTN Livelink Jan 2010

AdminScoring
Higher scores indicate that more friends were engaged in these behaviors, while the lowest score indicates the complete absence of any friends involved in these delinquent acts.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PDS_adai_inst




AccessNo
793

Name
Short Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability

Acronym
START

Developer
Webster, Christopher D.
Martin, Mary-Lou
Brink, Johann
Nicholls, Tonia L.
Desmarais, Sarah L.

Description
The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START) is a 20-item clinical guide used for the dynamic assessment of seven risk domains: violence to others, suicide, self-harm, self-neglect, unauthorized absence, substance use, and victimization. The START represents a refinement in the assessment of dynamic risk factors in that it provides for the differential coding of both patient strengths and needs, while allowing for the recording of case-specific risk factors. It is intended for interdisciplinary use and each of the 20 items is assessed according to succinct descriptions provided in the published manual. It takes 20 minutes to administer and complete.
<p>
The START is intended for use with adults with mental, personality and substance related disorders. It is relevant to inpatient and community psychiatric, forensic, and correctional populations. It is not designed for assessment during crisis.

Availability
This instrument is copyright protected. The START manual is available for purchase from BC Mental Health & Addiction Services, for $40 (CAN) plus shipping.
<a href="http://www.bcmhas.ca/Research/Research_START.htm">http://www.bcmhas.ca/Research/Research_START.htm</a>

Contact
BC Mental Health & Addiction Services<br>
<a href="http://www.bcmhas.ca">http://www.bcmhas.ca</a>

ADAI
We don't have a copy of this one.

SourceRef
Webster CD; Martin M; Brink J; Nicholls TL; Desmarais SL. Short Term Assessment of Risk Treatability (START). Coquitlam, B.C.: St. Joseph's Healthcare Forensic Services; B.C. Mental Health and Addiction Services, 2009.

OtherRef
Nicholls TL; Brink J; Desmarais SL; Webster CD; Martin M. The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START): A prospective validation study in a forensic psychiatric sample. Assessment 2006; 13(3):313-327.
Long CG; Hollin CR. Assessing comorbid substance use in detained psychiatric patients: issues and instruments for evaluating treatment outcome. Substance Use and Misuse 2009; 44(11):1602-1641.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Short+Term+Assessment+of+Risk+Treatability%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Short Term Assessment of Risk Treatability (START)</a>

SourceInfo
http://www.bcmhas.ca/Research/Research_START.htm
Other Ref (Long et al, 2009)

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
201003

Year
2009

Notes
WSIPP discussed this measure as one which may assist a clinician in the investigation process for involuntary treatment.
http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/11-01-3402.pdf

AdminScoring
Risk domains are coded on a 3-point (0-2) scale. The scale takes 8 minutes to complete.

ValidRely
This instrument is valid and has demonstrated good structural and concurrent reliability.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients
Offenders

Permalink
http://bit.ly/START_inst




AccessNo
796

Name
Addictive Behaviors Questionnaire

Acronym
ABQ

Developer
Malat, Jan
Collins, Jane
Dhayanandhan, Bramilee
Carullo, Frances
Turner, Nigel E.

Description
The Adictive Behaviors Questionnaire is a self-report screening instrument, which screens for a broad range of impulsive-compulsive behaviors in a treatment-seeking psychiatric population with comorbid addiction. The purpose of the ABQ is to help the clinician quickly screen for a broad range of potentially problem behaviors that are driven, repetitive, preoccupying, and out of control with adverse consequences. It is designed to reduce the risk of new, emerging problem behaviors being missed when the patient is reporting reduction in substance use. It is not a diagnostic tool. The 40-item instrument checks for the presence of 10 behaviors, including shoplifting, internet use, TV watching, gambling, sexual behavior, shopping, and work-related behavior. Substance use is not included and neither is compulsive exercise.
<p>
Each behavior is measured using the same 4 questions, covering a 6-month time period. The first question simply checks for the presence of the behavior (yes= 1; no= 0). The respondent is then asked 3 further questions: if the respondent has increased the amount of time that he/she carries out or thinks about the behavior (question 2), if the respondent or others are concerned about the behavior (question 3), and if the respondent has experienced loss of control regarding the behavior (question 4).

Availability
Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Jan Malat<br>
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health<br>
E1-218, 60 White Squirrel Way, 1001 Queen Street West<br>
Toronto, ON, Canada M6J 1H4<br>
<a href="mailto:jan_malat@camh.net">jan_malat@camh.net</a>

SourceRef
Malat J; Collins J; Dhayanandhan B; Carullo F; Turner NE. Addictive behaviors in comorbid addiction and mental illness: preliminary results from a self-report questionnaire. Journal of Addiction Medicine 2010; 4(1):38-44.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Addictive+Behaviors+Questionnaire%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Addictive Behaviors Questionnaire (ABQ)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20432%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">Shorter PROMIS Questionnaire (SPQ)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
201003

Year
2010

AdminScoring
The ABQ is designed to be brief and easily administered by clinicians treating patients with severe mental illness in an outpatient setting. Each behavior is measured using 4 questions, covering a 6-month time period. The first question simply checks for the presence of the behavior (yes= 1; no= 0). The respondent is then asked 3 further questions: if the respondent has increased the amount of time that he/she carries out or thinks about the behavior (question 2), if the respondent or others are concerned about the behavior (question 3), if the respondent has experienced loss of control regarding the behavior (question 4). These last 3 questions are scored using a 5 point Likert scale, ranging from "none at all" (0), "a little bit" (1), "moderately" (2), "quite a bit" (3), to "extremely" (4). Both a continuous score and a categorical score can be determined.

ValidRely
The instrument has demonstrated good reliability and test-retest reliability in preliminary results.

Status
public

Population
Co-occurring clients

Permalink
http://bit.ly/ABQ_inst




AccessNo
798

Name
My Mood Monitor

Acronym
M-3

Developer
Gaynes, Bradley N.
DeVeaugh-Geiss, Joanne
Weir, Sam
Gu, Hongbin
MacPherson, Cora
Schulberg, Herbert C.
Culpepper, Larry
Rubinow, David R.

Description
The M-3 Screen is a 1-page, brief symptom checklist that allows individuals to rate their mood by answering a short series of questions that touch on important indicators of mental health. It is designed for use in primary care settings, and by individuals who may take the M-3 online and bring their results to their health care provider if indicated. The M-3 is a self-administered 27-item screening questionnaire, and is a valid and effective tool to help primary care doctors screen patients for depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

<p>The developers are working on a version for individuals to monitor their mental health status over time.

Availability
The M-D can be taken online at: <a href="http://www.mymoodmonitor.com">http://www.mymoodmonitor.com</a>. A video demo is also linked from that site. My Mood Monitor™ V.03.06 Copyright © 2002-2010 by M3 Information™. No further reproduction or distribution is permitted without written permission from M3 Information.

Contact
M-3 Information<br>
Bethesda, MD<br>
<a href="mailto:mail@m-3information.com">mail@m-3information.com</a><br>
<a href="http://www.mymoodmonitor.com/">http://www.mymoodmonitor.com/</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\My Mood Monitor 978.pdf

SourceRef
Gaynes BN, DeVeaugh-Geiss J, Weir S, Gu H, MacPherson C, Schulberg HC, Culpepper L, Rubinow DR. Feasibility and diagnostic validity of the M-3 Checklist: A brief, self-rated screen for depressive, bipolar, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorders in primary care. Ann Fam Med 2010 8(2):160-169

Resources
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdBTCtosSIs&layer_token=b3b8c6b68e61ac4d">Video demo about the M-3</a>

SourceInfo
source ref: http://www.annfammed.org/cgi/content/abstract/8/2/160

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
ns

EntryDate
201003

Year
2010

AdminScoring
Patients took less than 5 minutes to complete the M-3 in the waiting room, and less than 1% reported not having time to complete it. Eighty-three percent of clinicians reviewed the checklist in 30 or fewer seconds, and 80% thought it was helpful in reviewing patients’ emotional health.

ValidRely
The M-3 demonstrates utility as a valid, efficient, and feasible tool for screening multiple common psychiatric illnesses, including bipolar disorder and PTSD, in primary care. Its diagnostic accuracy equals that of currently used single-disorder screens and has the additional benefit of being combined into a 1-page tool. The M-3 potentially can reduce missed psychiatric diagnoses and facilitate proper treatment of identified cases.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/M3_adai_inst




AccessNo
799

Name
Internet-User Assessment Screen
Internet-Use Screen

Acronym
IUAS

Developer
Chow, Siu L.
Leung, G. M.
Ng, Cecilia
Yu, Effie

Description
This 26-item screening tool (developed in Chinese) measures maladaptive Internet use. It can be used to classify adolescent internet-users into four categories: Occasional user (hobby, not excessive, self-control); Regular user (habitual); At-risk user (impulsive, sometimes loses control); Problem user (total loss of control, anger when stopped). The scale ends with 20 agree/disagree items that ask about specific problem behaviors, such as "I surf the net to avoid doing homework," "I get onto the Internet when I am unhappy or anxious," or "I can express myself on the net with no inhibition." (Note: The source reference refers to the name of this scale as both the "Internet-User Assessment Screen" and the "Internet-Use Screen.")

Availability
A copy of the scale, plus scoring/administration instructions, can be found in the source reference. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Siu L. Chow<br>
University of Regina<br>
Regina, Canada<br>
<a href="mailto:siu.chow@uregina.ca">siu.chow@uregina.ca</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Internet-User Assessment Screen 799.pdf

SourceRef
Chow SL, Leung GM, Ng C, Yu E. A screen for identifying maladaptive internet use. Int J Ment Health Addiction 2009;7:324-332.

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201001

Year
2009

AdminScoring
The total score obtainable is 25. Cut-off criteria (total scores) for each of the four categories of users are: Occasional user (3 or lower), Regular user (4-11), At-risk user (12-16), Problem user (17 or above). Scoring instructions are available in the source reference.

ValidRely
This scale has demonstrated split-half validity and concurrent criterion-related validity (see source reference).

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IUAS_inst




AccessNo
800

Name
Internet Over-Use Scale
Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale

Acronym
IOS
COS

Developer
Jenaro, Christina
Flores, Noelia
Gomez-Vela, Maria
Gonzalez-Gil, Francisca
Caballo, Cristina

Description
These two scales were developed to help identify pattersn of pathological Internet and cell-phone use in college students, as well as to identify psychological, health, and behavioral correlates. DSM-IV critera for impulse control disorders, specifically pathological gambling, were use to create the items for the scales. Both measure consist of parallel forms (the term "internet" is replaced by "cell-phone" for the second scale) of 23 items for each of the included DSM-IV criteria. Both measures use a six-point Likert-type response format, with high scores reflecting higher overuse (1 = "never" and 6 = "always"). Items include questions such as "How often do you anticipate your next Internet connection/next use of the mobile phone?", "How often do you try to reduce the importance of time spent connected to the Internet/using the phone?", and "Have you risk an important relation, job, academic opportunity, or career development due to your overuse of the Internet/mobile phone?"

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. Nine samples items from the 23-item scales can be found in the source reference.

Contact
Cristina Jenaro<br>
University of Salamanca<br>
Avda. de la Merce, 109-131, 37005-Salamanca (Spain)<br>
tel: +34-923-294695<br>
<a href="mailto:crisje@usal.es">crisje@usal.es</a>

SourceRef
Jenaro C, Flores N, Gomez-Vela M, Gonzalez-Gil F, Caballo C. Problematic internet and cell-phone use: Psychological, behavioral, and health correlates. Addiction Research and Theory 2007;15(3):309-320

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201003

Year
2007

ValidRely
Data shows good reliability levels for both measures, with alpha indexes close to 0.90. Construct (convergent and discriminant) validity has also been tested and shown to be good.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
College students

Permalink
http://bit.ly/IOS_COS_inst




AccessNo
801

Name
Problem Video Game Playing

Acronym
PVP

Developer
Tejeiro Salguero RA
Bersabe Moran RM

Description
Some researchers suggest that for some people, video game playing is an addictive behavior similar to substance dependence. This short, 9-item scale was developed to measure the problems associated with the apparently addictive use of all types of video games and video game systems. All but one of the DSM-IV criteria for substance abuse, and all but one for pathological gambling, are included in the PVP. Subjects are instructed to answer about the occurrence of each behavior during the previous year. Items include statements such as "When I am not playing with the video games, I keep thinking about them," "When I can't use video games, I get restless or irritable," and "In order to play video games, I have skipped classes or work, lied, stolen, or had an argument or fight with someone." The scale appears to be a useful questionnaire for obtaining a quantitative index of problem video game use.

Availability
This scale was originally developed in Spanish. An English translation of the scale's 9-items can be found in Appendix I of the source reference. Copyright information unavailable.

Contact
Dr. Ricardo A. Tejeiro Salguero<br>
Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Spain<br>
<a href="mailto:tejeirosalguero@terra.es">tejeirosalguero@terra.es</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Problem Video Game Playing 801.pdf

SourceRef
Tejeiro Salguero RA, Bersabe Moran RM. Measuring problem video game playing in adolescents. Addiction 2002;97(12):1601-1606.

SourceInfo
Source ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201003

Year
2002

AdminScoring
Psychometric analyses show that the PVP seems to be unidimensional and has acceptable internal consistency and construct validity.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PVP_inst




AccessNo
802

Name
Subtle Trauma Symptom Screening Scale

Developer
Hohman, Melinda
Roads, Lori
Corbett, Rosalind

Description
This measure of 6 items can help alert clinicians to possible trauma symptoms in clients who are reticent to disclose them. It is a brief screen for trauma symptoms in women with substance use disorders and can be embedded into a general needs assessment, such as the scale "What I Want From Treatment," to make symptoms easier to report. The six items mainly reflect internal emotional states and are answered with "yes" or "no." Items include statements such as, "I want help with angry feelings and how I express them," "I want to learn how to relax better," and "I want to work on having better self-esteem." It is hoped that this early screening scale will be useful to help identify those who struggle with trauma symptoms so that, if they choose, they can begin to discuss and identify how their trauma experiences are connected to their concerns.

Availability
Coypright information unavailable. The six items in this scale can be found in the Source Reference.

Contact
Melinda Hohman, PhD.<br>
School of Social Work, San Diego State University<br>
5500 Campanile Dr.<br>
San Diego, CA 92182-4119 U.S.A.<br>
<a href="mailto:mhohman@mail.sdsu.edu">mhohman@mail.sdsu.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Subtle Trauma Symptom Screening Scale 802.pdf

SourceRef
Hohman M; Roads L; Corbett R. Initial validation of a Subtle Trauma Symptom Screening scale embedded in a needs assessment given to women entering drug treatment. Journal of Dual Diagnosis 2010; 6(1):2-15.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Subtle+Trauma+Symptom+Screening+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Subtle Trauma Symptom Screening Scale</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Instruments&CS=0&QY=find%20%28AccessNo%20ct%20265%29&RF=Full&DF=Full&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">What I Want From Treatment</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
PM, MB

EntryDate
201003

Year
2010

Status
public

Population
Women

Permalink
http://bit.ly/STSSS_inst




AccessNo
812

Name
Cannabis Use Problems Identification Test

Acronym
CUPIT

Developer
Bashford, Jan
Flett, Ross
Copeland, Jan

Description
The CUPIT is a brief cannabis screening instrument that is reliable, valid, and acceptable for use across diverse community settings and consumers of all ages. It has clear potential to assist with achievement of public health goals to reduce cannabis-related harms in the community. It reliably classifies both currently diagnosable and potentially problematic cannabis use among respondents. The 16 items of the CUPIT measure the DSM/ICD tridimensional concept of risky use (items 1 and 2), dependence/using behavior (3-10), and health and social problems (11-16).

Availability
The CUPIT is available online. Copyright owner is Jan Bashford, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Contact
Jan Bashford<br>
33 Brooklands Road<br>
Nelson, New Zealand 7010<br>
<a href="mailto:jbashford@clear.net.nz">jbashford@clear.net.nz</a>

InstURL
http://ncpic.org.au/static/downloads/workforce/cannabisinfo/assessment-tools/cannabis-use-problems-identification-test.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Cannabis Use Problems Identification Test 812.pdf

SourceRef
Bashford J, Flett R, Copeland J. The Cannabis Use Problems Identification Test (CUPIT): development, reliability, concurrent and predictive value among adolescents and adults. Addiction 2010; 105(4):615-625.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20CUPIT%20/%20Cannabis+Use+Problems+Identification+Test%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Cannabis Use Problems Identification Test (CUPIT)</a>

SourceInfo
Source Ref

InstrumentType
Self-administered questionnaire
Screening

EnteredBy
ns, pm

EntryDate
201004

Year
2010

InstURLHost
Nat'l Cannabis Prevention & Information Centre

AdminScoring
The CUPIT requires a reading level of approximately 7/8 years' schooling and about 5 minutes administration tiem. Scores can range from 0 (no use at all) to 82 (daily/more than daily use, severely problematic). It is rapidly scored and interpreted, self- or other-administered and has potential as a population screener, research tool, pre-post measure in clinical outcomes assessment, a discrete screener or component embedded within a life-style questionnaire, and is adaptable for computerized administration.

ValidRely
Valid and reliable.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/CUPIT_inst




AccessNo
823

Name
Neuropsych Questionnaire

Acronym
NPQ

Developer
Gualtiere, C. Thomas

Description
This questionnaire addresses two important clinical issues: how to screen patients for a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders quickly and efficiently, and how to acquire independent verification of a patient's complaints. The NPQ is available over the Internet in both adult and pediatric versions (the adult version consists of 207 items). The NPQ scores patient and/or observer resopnses in terms of 20 symptom clusters: inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, learning problems, memory, anxiety, panic, agoraphobia, obsessions and compulsions, social anxiety, depression, mood instability, mania, aggression, psychosis, somatization, fatigue, sleep, suicide, pain, and substance abuse. The NPQ is suitable for initial patient evaluations, and a short form is appropriate for follow-up assessment.

Availability
Both the full and short-form versions of the NPQ are available without charge to qualified psychiatrists, neurologists, and psychologists. All that is required is a PC and a high-speed Internet connection. The program works best on Mozilla/Firefox, a free internet browser. Detailed instructions on accessing the NPQ can be found in the "Availability of the NPQ" section of the source reference, available for free on PubMed Central: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2234274/">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2234274/</a>.

Contact
North Carolina Neuropsychiatry, PA<br>
400 Franklin Square<br>
Chapel Hill, NC 27514<br>
tel: 919-933-2000<br>
<a href="mailto:info@ncneuropsych.com">info@ncneuropsych.com</a>
<a href="http://www.ncneuropsych.com">http://www.ncneuropsych.com</a>

InstURL
http://www.ncneuropsych.com/neuropsych-online-assessment.html

SourceRef
Gualtiere CT. An internet-based symptom questionnaire that is reliable, valid, and available to psychiatrists, neurologists, and psychologists. Med Gen Med 2007;9(4):3. (<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2234274/">full text free from PubMed Central</a>)

SourceInfo
Source ref.

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire
Observer-rated scale

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201005

Year
2007

InstURLHost
North Carolina Neuropsychiatry

AdminScoring
The NPQ takes about 15 minutes to complete and also includes a 45 item follow-up version that can be administered in under 5 minuts.

ValidRely
The NPQ is reliable and discriminates patients with different diagnoses. Scores generated by the NPQ correlate reasonably well with commonly used rating scales and the test is sensitive to the effects of treatment.

Status
public

Population
Adults
Children
Adolescents

Permalink
http://bit.ly/NPQ_inst




AccessNo
825

Name
Readiness for Mental Health Treatment
URICA - Short Form

Developer
Heesch, Kristiann C.
Velasquez, Mary M.
von Stemberg, Kirk

Description
The Readiness for Mental Health Treatment measure is a 12-item instrument; the item stems are the same as in the original URICA-A. Three items each represent the precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance stage of readiness for mental health treatment. As in the original instrument, the means of subscale items are computed to represent subscale scores, and responses are on a five-point Likert scale. Items describe situations in which a person may experience mental or emotional problems. Participants are asked to rate how they might feel at the present time when in these situations.
<p>
In a comparison of the URICA-A and the Readiness for Mental Health Treatment measure by Heesch et al (2005), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) reveals that the measures have similar factor structures, but correlation and cluster analyses suggest that separate levels of patient motivation exist for mental health treatment and changing alcohol use. The newly developed mental health treatment measure will help clinicians tailor interventions to their patients' needs.

<p>This instrument is also known as URICA - Short Form.

Availability
This instrument is in the public domain.

InstURL
http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/groups/disabilities/documents/pub/dhs16_141689.pdf

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument\ PDFs\Readiness for Mental Health Treatment 825.pdf

SourceRef
Heesch KC, Velasquez MM, von Sternberg K. Readiness for mental health treatment and for changing alcohol use in patients with comorbid psychiatric and alcohol disorders: are they congruent? Addict Behav 2005;30(3):531-43.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20URICA%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA)</a>

RelatedInst
<a href="http://bit.ly/URICA_inst">University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA)</a>

InstrumentType
Screening

EnteredBy
NS, MB

EntryDate
201005

Year
1983

InstURLHost
MN Dept of Human Services

Notes
Look for more instruments on MH screening: http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/idcplg?IdcService=GET_FILE&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&Rendition=Primary&allowInterrupt=1&noSaveAs=1&dDocName=dhs16_145318 (includes some full instruments)

ValidRely
In the study by Heesch et al (2005), internal consistency coefficients for the precontemplation and maintenance subscales were adequate (Cronbach's alpha=.54 and .58, respectively) and excellent for the contemplation and action subscales (Cronbach's alpha=.83 and .84, respectively).

Status
public

Population
Adults
Co-occurring clients

Matrix
Y

Permalink
http://bit.ly/RMHT_inst




AccessNo
830

Name
Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview

Acronym
HRS-I

Developer
Tolin, David F.
Frost, Randy O.
Steketee, Gail

Description
The Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview is a brief 5-item semi-structured interview that assesses the five primary features of compulsive hoarding: clutter, difficulty discarding, acquisition, distress, and impairment. The scale shows promise as both a diagnostic instrument and as a means for determining the severity of compulsive hoarding.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale is available in the appendix of the source reference (Tolin et al, 2010).

Contact
David F. Tobin<br>
Anxiety Disorders Center<br>
Institute of Living<br>
Hartford, CT<br>
tel: 1-860-545-7685<br>
<a href="mailto:dtolin@harthosp.org">dtolin@harthosp.org</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Hoarding Rating Scale Interview 830.pdf

SourceRef
Tolin DF, Frost RO, Steketee G. A brief interview for assessing compulsive hoarding: The Hoarding Rating Scale-Interview. Psychiatry Research 2010;178:147-152.

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201006

Year
2010

AdminScoring
Each of the measure's 5 items are rated on a scale ranging from 0 (Not at all difficult) to 8 (Extremely difficult). It takes approximately 5-10 minutes to administer the HRS-I.

ValidRely
The HRS-I showed high internal consistency and reliability across time and context.

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/HRS-I_inst




AccessNo
831

Name
Modified Selective Severity Assessment
Milwaukee Selective Severity Assessment

Acronym
MSSA

Developer
Benzer, David G.

Description
The Modified Selective Severity Assessment (also called the "Milwaukee Selective Severity Assessment") is a practical adaptation of the Selective Severity Assessment, designed to monitor and quantify that alcohol withdrawal syndrome in any medical settting It features ten items addressing symptoms such as eating or sleep disturbances, quality of contact with others, pulse rate, tremor, and agitation. It allows for quick diagnosis and treatment of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome, which can in turn significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. Monitoring with the MSSA can be done on a one-time basis as part of an assessment of an alcoholic patient, or on a more regular basis, such as with patients in inpatient settings.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found in Table 1 of the source reference (Benzer 1990).

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Modified Selective Severity Assessment 831.pdf

SourceRef
Benzer DG. Quantification of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome in 487 alcoholic patients. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 1990;7:117-123

OtherRef
Malcolm R, Myrick H, Brady KT, Ballenger JC. Update on anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Am J Addict 2001;10(1 suppl 1):16-23

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20MSSA%20/%20Modified+Selective+Severity+Assessment%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Modified Selective Severity Assessment (MSSA)</a>

RelatedInst
Selective Severity Assessment (Gross, Lewis, & Hastey, 1973)

SourceInfo
source ref, other ref

InstrumentType
Clinician-administered interview
Screening

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201006

Year
1990

Status
public

Population
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/MSSA_inst




AccessNo
832

Name
Self-Control Scale
Brief Self-Control Scale

Acronym
SCS
BSCS

Developer
Tangney, June P.
Baumeister, Roy F.
Boone, Angie Luzio

Description
High self-control appears to be a predictor of more positive outcomes from treatment, while low self-control is a significant risk factor for a broad range of personal and interpersonal problems. This relatively brief, paper-and-pencil measure was designed to assess individual differences in self-control. Items in the scale are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 (not at all like me) to 5 (very much like me) and include statements such as "I am good at resisting temptation," "I refuse things that are bad for me," "I get carried away by my feelings," and "I'd be better off if I stopped to think before acting." A factor analysis of the scale found two factors: impulse control (the perceived ability to resist temptation) and general self-discipline (the perceived ability to achieve goals). A brief version of the scale, using 13 items, performs nearly as well as the full-length version (see source reference). Higher scores on self-control correlated with a higher grade point average, better adjustment (fewer reports of psychopathology, higher self-esteem), less binge eating and alcohol abuse, better relationships and interpersonal skills, secure attachment, and more optimal emotional responses.

Availability
Copyright information unavailable. A copy of the scale can be found in the appendix of the source reference (Tangney et al, 2004).

Contact
June P. Tangney, PhD<br>
Dept. of Psychology, George Mason University<br>
4400 University Dr.<br>
Fairfax, VA 22030-4444<br>
<a href="mailto:jtangney@gmu.edu">jtangney@gmu.edu</a>

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Self Control Scale 832.pdf

SourceRef
Tangney JP, Baumeister RF, Boone AL. High self-control predicts good adjustment, less pathology, better grades, and interpersonal success. Journal of Personality 2004;72(2):271-324.

OtherRef
Ferrari JR, Stevens EB, Jason LA. An exploratory analysis of changes in self-regulation and social support among men and women in recovery. Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery 2010;5:145-154.

Resources
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/dbtw-wpd/exec/dbtwpub.dll?BU=http%3A//lib.adai.washington.edu/instrumentsearch.htm&TN=Books2&MQ=MultiQuery&CS=0&QY=find%20%28Title%20/%20Subjects%20/%20Descriptors%20/%20Instruments%20ct%20Self+Control+Scale%29&RF=MultiReport&DF=FullDisplay&MR=&NP=3&RL=0&DL=0&XC=&ID=&AC=QBE_QUERY">ADAI Library Search: Self-Control Scale (SCS)</a>

SourceInfo
Source ref, other ref

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201006

Year
2004

ValidRely
Both the full Self-Control Scale and the Brief Self-Control Scale demonstrated adequate internal consistency and retest reliability. The scale performs well as a trait measure.

Status
public

Population
Adolescents
Adults

Permalink
http://bit.ly/SCS_inst




AccessNo
834

Name
Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screen

Acronym
PC-PTSD

Developer
Prins, Annabel
Ouimette, Paige
Kimerling, Rachel
Cameron, Rebecca P.
Hugelshofer, Daniela S.
Shaw-Hegwer, Jennifer
Thrailkill, Ann
Gusman, Fred D.
Sheikh, Javaid I.

Description
The PC-PTSD is a 4-item screen that was designed for use in primary care and other medical settings and is currently used to screen for PTSD in veterans at the VA. The screen includes an introductory sentence to cue respondents to traumatic events. Each item is answered either "yes" or "no" and ask about symptoms in the past 30 days. The screen does not include a list of potentially traumatic events. The screener has been validated in a VA primary care population and a VA substance use population, as well as in civilian primary care and substance use populations, and has demonstrated good diagnostic efficiency in all four settings.


Availability
The four items in the scale can be found in the source reference and online at the VA web site (see below).

Contact
Annabel Prins, PhD<br>
San Jose State University<br>
tel: 408-924-5671<br>
<a href="mailto:Annabel.Prins@va.gov">Annabel.Prins@va.gov</a>

InstURL
http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/pages/assessments/pc-ptsd.asp

ADAI
G:\Library\Instruments Library\Instrument PDFs\Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screen 834.pdf [pdf taken from http://www.dvs.virginia.gov/woundedwarrior/pdf/2-PrimaryCarePTSDScreen.pdf]

SourceRef
Prins A, Ouimette P, Kimerling R, Cameron RP, Hugelshofer DS, Shaw-Hegwer J, Thrailkill A, Gusman FD, Sheikh JI. The primary care PTSD screen (PC-PTSD): Development and operating characteristics. Primary Care Psychiatry 2003;9:9-14.

OtherRef
van Dam D, Ehring T, Vedel E, Emmelkamp PMG. Validation of the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screening questionnaire (PC-PTSD) in civilian substance abuse disorder patients. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2010;39(2):105-113.
Freedy JR, Steenkamp MM, Magruder KM, Yeager DE, Zoller JS, Hueston WJ, Carek PJ. Post-traumatic stress disorder screening test performance in civilian primary care. Family Practice 2010;27(6):615-624
Calhoun PS, McDonald SD, Guerra VS, Eggleston AM, Beckham JC, Straits-Troster K. Clinical utility of the Primary Care-PTSD Screen among U.S. veterans who served since September 11, 2001. Psychiatry Res 2010;178(2):330-5.
Bliese PD, Wright KM, Adler AB, Cabrera O, Castro CA, Hoge CW. Validating the primary care posttraumatic stress disorder screen and the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist with soldiers returning from combat. J Consult Clin Psychol 2008;76(2):272-81.
Ouimette P, Wade M, Prins A, Schohn M. Identifying PTSD in primary care: Comparison of the Primary Care-PTSD Screen (PC-PTSD) and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ). J Anxiety Disord 2008;22(2):337-43.

SourceInfo
Source ref, other refs, VA web site

InstrumentType
Screening
Self-administered questionnaire

EnteredBy
MB

EntryDate
201007

Year
2003

InstURLHost
Department of Veterans Affairs

AdminScoring
In most circumstances, the results of the PC-PTSD should be considered "positive" if a patient answers "yes" to any 3 items. Those screening positive whould then be assessed with a structured interview for PTSD.

ValidRely
Results of psychometric analysis have found the PC-PTSD to be a useful and sensitive screening instrument for PTSD in both veteran and civilian populations. (See Other References.)

Status
public

Population
Adults
Veterans

Permalink
http://bit.ly/PCPTSD_inst




AccessNo
840

Name
Iowa Alcoholic Stages Index

Acronym
<