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Title
Combining Medications and Behavioral Interventions for Alcoholism
ShortName
COMBINE Study
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
U10AA011799
Abstract
Recent research has suggested that a number of medications hold promise for improving outcomes in alcohol treatment. In particular, naltrexone and acamprosate act at different receptor sites and have each demonstrated an impact on alcohol consumption in animal and clinical trials. However, these drugs are typically given as an adjunct to behavioral interventions, despite little research to guide the specific nature of possible interactions between behavioral and pharmacological interventions. The present application proposes both a pilot study and a larger scale study for inclusion in the NIAAA cooperative agreement focusing on combined use of pharmacotherapies and behavioral interventions in the treatment of alcohol problems. A preliminary randomized trial is proposed that would evaluate the acceptability, safety, and clinical outcomes of naltrexone and acamprosate used in combination. The preliminary study will monitor side effects, adverse consequences, medication compliance, treatment retention, and changes in drinking, and craving during a 3-month trial period. The larger study is designed as a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical efficacy trial of six-month intervention investigating the relative efficacy of two medications, naltrexone and acamprosate, used in combination with two behavioral interventions, one basic Motivation and Compliance Enhancement (MCE) and one where specific relapse preventive skills-training is added, MCE plus Integrated Relapse Prevention (MCE/IRP) across a twelve month post-intervention follow-up. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions combining the medications 1) naltrexone/acamprosate, 2) naltrexone placebo, 3) placebo acamprosate, and 4) placebo/placebo. All subjects will also receive a behavioral intervention to enhance motivation for chance (based on Motivational Enhancement Therapy) and medication compliance. Participants will be randomized to either eight sessions of Motivation and Compliance Enhancement or fifteen sessions of Integrated Relapse Prevention. Aims for the large study include: a) comparing, main and interactive effects of naltrexone, acamprosate, and behavioral interventions on outcome, b) evaluating medication compliance, treatment retention, and therapist effects medication clinical outcomes, and c) identifying patient attributes associated with differential response to the intervention combinations, thus suggesting, possible client-treatment matches.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Descriptors
acamprosate
alcoholism/alcohol abuse
alcoholism/alcohol abuse chemotherapy
alcoholism/alcohol abuse therapy
behavior therapy
combination therapy
human therapy evaluation
naltrexone
clinical trial phase III
combination chemotherapy
cooperative study
therapy compliance
behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
human subject
patient oriented research
ProjStart
September 30, 1997
ProjEnd
August 31, 2005
ProjStaff
Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe, MSW - Research Consultant
Carolyn Cichanski - Research Coordinator
Jennifer Williams - Research Coordinator
AccessNo
1
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
Local COMBINE Study site: <a href="http://adai.uw.edu/combine_uw.htm">http://adai.uw.edu/combine_uw.htm</a>
National COMBINE site: <a href="http://www.cscc.unc.edu/combine/">http://www.cscc.unc.edu/combine/</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project aims to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of naltrexone and acamprosate pharmacological treatments when combined with one of two types of cognitive behavioral therapies for alcohol-dependent individuals.

Title
Clinical Trials Network: Pacific Northwest (Washington) Node
ShortName
Washington Node
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
DA013714
Abstract
Drug dependence continues to be a persistent problem for which new treatments, both behavioral and pharmacological, are continually being developed. There is a great need to develop mechanisms by which such treatments, once shown to be efficacious, can be put into widespread clinical practice in community-based treatment programs where the largest number of drug abusers are seen. A number of barriers between researchers and clinicians, however, have made such a transition difficult, if at all possible. The recent Institute of Medicine report has challenged us to work on "bridging the gap," to address the barriers to facilitate a more functional working relationship between treatment providers and clinical researchers, who share a common goal of wanting to improve substance abuse treatment and its outcomes. NIDA has developed an action agenda to stimulate treatment providers and researchers to consider ways, from each of their perspectives, to narrow or bridge the "gap." NIDA's action agenda is the development of the National Clinical Trials Network (CTN), in which researchers at Regional Research and Training Centers work in partnership with Community-based Treatment Programs both to develop areas of mutual interest for future clinical research and to test promising therapies in community settings.
The present proposal seeks support to develop the Pacific Northwest (PN) Regional Research and Training Center of the NIDA-funded Clinical Trials Network. The interdisciplinary Regional Research and Training Center, to be housed within the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute (ADAI), will have as its primary focus the development, implementation, and evaluation of behavioral and pharmacological therapies, alone and in combination, targeted at drug use as delivered in the real world settings of the affiliated community-based treatment programs. It will integrate behavioral and pharmacological research as a means of informing policy, therapy development, and the evaluation process, with a goal of contributing meaningfully to the improved effectiveness of new and promising therapies developed within the larger Clinical Trials Network. The investigators have a long history of working with community based programs in research and program evaluation, collaborating on multisite clinical trials, developing and evaluating both pharmacotherapy and behavioral therapy, and conducting services research, and translating and disseminating results into information useful for clinicians and policy makers. It is this experience that we offer to the larger Clinical Trials Network.
For more information about the Washington Node, including a list of the staff and active protocols, visit the <a href="http://depts.washington.edu/adai/ctn-wa">CTN-WA web site</a>.
Categories
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
Clinical and Health Services
Descriptors
drug abuse therapy
human therapy evaluation
interdisciplinary collaboration
clinical trial
combination therapy
cooperative study
drug abuse chemotherapy
health care policy
health care service availability
clinical research
human subject
ProjStart
January 10, 2001
ProjEnd
August 31, 2007
ProjStaff
Elizabeth Wells, PhD
T. Ronald Jackson, MSW
Andrew J. Saxon, MD
Molly Carney, PhD
John Baer, PhD
Donald Calsyn, PhD
Brenda Stuvek
Mary Hatch-Maillette, PhD
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
AccessNo
2
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/ctn/index.htm">PNW Node website</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The NIDA CTN is a multisite network of regional research and training centers working in conjunction with community-based treatment programs to implement and evaluate behavioral and pharmacological interventions with demonstrated efficacy in community-based programs.

Title
Alcohol and Condom Use: Different Levels of Measurement
ShortName
Condom Use
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R01AA013688
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship of alcohol use to condom use from a methodological perspective. Studies on the link between drinking and risky sex have yielded inconsistent results that vary depending upon the method used to analyze the relationship. Although correlational studies show that heavier drinkers have more unprotected sex, studies of specific sexual encounters find that drinking reduces condom use only among adolescents, and studies that incorporate multiple sexual encounters per person show no relationship of drinking to condom use. Thus, measuring alcohol use and sexual behavior at different levels-the person level, the event level, and within person-results in different findings, but this variation in has not been studied systematically. The proposed study offers a unique opportunity to address an important substantive and methodological issue by explicitly examining how and why different methods used to examine the relationship between drinking and condom use have produced different results. In this project, we will: (1) Combine data from several general population surveys that use the same measures (2). Describe the relationship of drinking to unsafe sex at three different levels: the person level, the event level, and within person (3). Systematically investigate reasons for differences in findings from the three methods, including the presence of nondrinkers in the samples and the role of confounding individual differences (4). Examine the role of individual and situational factors-including sexual attitudes, expectancies about drinking and sex, and perception of risk-in explaining the alcohol-risky sex link at different levels.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
August 1, 2002
ProjEnd
July 31, 2005
AccessNo
4
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6785242&icde=5823106">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The purpose of this NIAAA-funded project is to examine the relationship of alcohol use to condom use from a methodological perspective.

Title
Implicit Cognition and HIV Risk Behavior in Drug Users
ShortName
Implicit Cognition
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
R01DA012101
Abstract
In recent years, a growing body of research has demonstrated that the use of alcohol or drugs with sex is related to the occurrence of unsafe sexual activities-notably unprotected intercourse-that place an individual at risk for pregnancy or disease transmission, however, contradictory findings also exist (Leigh & Stall, 1993). Despite an explosion of research in recent years of research on this topic, there has yet been no attempt to identify all existing studies, suggest factors that may affect heterogeneity among study findings, and analyze these factors quantitatively. The objectives of the proposed research are to further explore the relationship of substance use to risky sexual behavior by conducting a meta-analysis of existing studies of this relationship. The results of this analysis can enhance understanding the dynamics of the relationship of substance use to risky sexual behavior, thereby contributing to research, preventive and education efforts to contain the spread of AIDS.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
August 1, 1998
ProjEnd
July 31, 2005
AccessNo
5
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6523016&icde=5823106">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The goal of this project is to study the cognitive, situational, and behavioral antecedents of risky sexual behavior in drug users, using a theoretical framework that is well grounded in cognitive science. Four studies are proposed to examine how risky sexual behavior may be mediated by activation of concepts in memory, prompted by certain situations and antecedent behaviors (including drug use).

Title
Substance Use and Predictors of Risk Behavior
ShortName
Risk Behavior
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
K02AA000183
Abstract
This project is an Independent Scientist Award allowing Dr. Leigh to continue her program of research on substance use and risk behavior. The major goal for this award period is to explore different methodological approaches to examining substance use and risky sexual behavior. The research program includes a meta-analysis of existing studies on the relationship of substance use to risky sexual behavior and a study that uses a daily event data collection methodology to investigate the nature of relationships between substance use and risky sexual behavior. Plans for career enhancement include further training in epidemiology and biostatistics and collaboration with colleagues in public health disciplines.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
May 1, 1994
ProjEnd
April 30, 2005
AccessNo
6
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This grant is a five-year Independent Scientist Award from NIAAA. The award allows Dr. Leigh to continue her research in the area of substance use and sexual behavior, in particular, sexual behavior that is risky in terms of HIV transmission.

Title
Adolescent Substance Use and HIV Risk: Event Analysis
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R21AA015040
Abstract
The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship of substance use to HIV risk behavior among adolescents in their first sexual encounters compared to more recent encounters. Reviews of studies of substance use and condom use in specific sexual encounters suggest that drinking is associated with nonuse of condoms or other contraception at first intercourse, but not in other kinds of sexual encounters. However, this proposition has not been explicitly tested. Using other drugs, either alone or with alcohol, might be associated with nonuse of condoms, but many existing studies do not separate the effects of alcohol and different types of drugs. In this project, we will use the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a large, nationally representative study of adolescents in grades 7 to 12, to investigate the role of drinking and other drug use in the use of condoms and other contraceptives in first and recent sexual encounters. We will: 1. Describe patterns of drinking, other drug use, and contraceptive use in the first sexual experience and the most recent sexual experience; 2. Use appropriate multilevel statistical techniques to assess the association of substance use and contraceptive use in these events; and 3. Investigate potential reasons for differences in the role of substance use and risk behavior in the two events, including the age of the respondent, the characteristics of the sexual partner, and the sexual experience of the partners.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
September 01, 2004
ProjEnd
August 30, 2006
AccessNo
7
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship of substance use to HIV risk behavior among adolescents in their first sexual encounters compared to more recent encounters.

Title
Alcohol and Acquaintance Assault Risk Perception
ShortName
Alcohol and Rape Risk (Project SIS)
PIName
Jeanette Norris, PhD
PITitle
Senior Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R01AA012219
Abstract
Sexual assault by acquaintances is a serious problem for young women. Approximately one in four experiences either rape or attempted rape, the overwhelming majority of which are committed by acquaintances. Alcohol consumption by the victim, assailant, or both is involved in more than half of these assaults.
One key element of sexual assault prevention is early perception of risk, which enables a woman to respond effectively and extricate herself from the situation before it escalates. In assessing risk and responding to it, women make a series of primary and secondary cognitive appraisals. Primary appraisals are those directed specifically to acknowledging and assessing the level of risk in a particular situation. Secondary appraisals involve weighing the ability to respond effectively against psychological barriers. A woman's own alcohol consumption and her perception of the assailant's consumption can affect this cognitive appraisal process.
This project, funded by NIAAA, will investigate alcohol's physiological, psychological, and expectancy effects on cognitive appraisals and responses to sexual assault. It will employ theoretical models of cognitive appraisal and coping and response conflict related to alcohol consumption. Data collection for the project is now complete, and data analysis is proceeding.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
Descriptors
alcoholic beverage consumption
decision making, prevention
rape
social model
social perception
substance abuse related behavior
women's health attitude
dyadic interaction
expectancy
high risk behavior/lifestyle/behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
female
human subject
ProjStart
February 3, 2000
ProjEnd
May 31, 2005
ProjStaff
Kristen Mariano - Research Coordinator
Kim Nomensen - Research Assistant
Margaret Thomas - Research Assistant
AccessNo
13
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
norris@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project is conducting a series of experimental studies to examine the effects of alcohol consumption on cognitive mediation processes involved in women's perceptions of acquaintance sexual assault risk, evaluation of their concerns, and their responses to sexual aggression.

Title
Alcohol and Women's Cognitive Mediation of HIV Risk Taking
ShortName
HIV Risk-Taking (Project WIN)
PIName
Jeanette Norris, PhD
PITitle
Senior Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5R01AA014512-05
Abstract
This project will experimentally investigate alcohol's physiological and expectancy set effects in young women of drinking age, as well as the role of alcohol expectancies in 18-20 year old women, regarding their appraisals of HIV risk, condom negotiation, and sexual decision making.
<p>
The proportion of all AIDS cases reported among women has more than tripled since 1985. It appears that relationships with men are the greatest source of HIV risk for women. Women's ability to successfully negotiate is an important component of the process. Although the ultimate decision to use preventative measures is the man's, in a consensual encounter, there is still an opportunity for a woman to insist or influence that decision. Alcohol consumption can interfere with the effectiveness of a woman's negotiation and the decision not to be involved in risky behavior.

<p>We propose that these outcomes are cognitively mediated by a series of primary and secondary appraisals during these encounters. Primary appraisals are those directed toward recognizing that a situation is likely to lead to these inevitable men-women encounters. Secondary appraisals involve assessing the advantages and disadvantages of engaging in negotiation, and can influence the effectiveness of the negotiation. In addition to being influenced by alcohol, both directly through actual consumption and indirectly through expectancies, these secondary appraisals and subsequent negotiation can be influenced by the type of relationship the woman has with the man and her knowledge about his relationship history. Ultimately these will lead to her decision whether to have unprotected relationship.
<p>Theoretical models of cognitive mediation and the effects of alcohol consumption and expectancies provide the foundation for this work. Four experiments are proposed to investigate physiological and expectancy set effects in young women of drinking age. An additional four experiments will investigate the role of alcohol expectancies in 18-20 year old women. Manipulated variables in the between-subjects experimental design include relationship type and knowledge of partner's relationship history, depending on the experiment. The role of background factors related to the relational self, and victimization history will also be examined. This work will provide important information about how women's alcohol consumption and expectancies about relationships affect their assessment of situations, negotiation, and decisions about unprotected involvement. Findings have implications for designing prevention interventions, especially related to alcohol's role as a risk factor for contracting HIV.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
Descriptors
alcoholic beverage consumption
high risk behavior/lifestyle
safe sex/sex abstinence
sex behavior
substance abuse related behavior
women's health
HIV infection
adolescence (12-20)
age difference
condom
decision making
disease/disorder proneness/risk
expectancy
neuropharmacology
psychological model
young adult human (21-34)
behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
female
human subject
questionnaire
ProjStart
September 22, 2003
ProjEnd
August 31, 2009
ProjStaff
George, William H PhD (Psychology)
Morrison, Diane M PhD (School of Social Work)
Zawacki, Tina PhD (University of Texas San Antonio)
Notes
RFA-AA-03-004
AccessNo
14
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7277838&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
norris@u.washington.edu

Title
Substance Use and Suicide in Street Youth
ShortName
Substance Use & Suicide (Project MARS)
PIName
Joshua A. Ginzler, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
K01DA014685
Abstract
This proposal is in response to PA 00-019. My goal is to pursue a research career in an academic setting with a substantive focus on the etiology of adolescent psychopathology. In particular, I am interested in understanding the factors that promote substance use disorders (SUD), and the comorbid relationship that SUD has with other psychopathology. Although my past training has provided me with a foundation in conducting longitudinal studies of adolescent SUD, none of my prior training has been broadly focused on developmental psychopathology. The central aims of the proposed Research Career Award (RCA) will be to (1) provide advanced training in research methods and quantitative techniques necessary for me to continue developing as an independent investigator and (2) to conduct an investigation that will advance our understanding of the SUD and suicidality, particularly in an extremely high-risk population of homeless adolescents. The performance site will be the University of Washington at Seattle, and my training mentors will be Drs. Thompson, Baer, and Cauce locally, and Dr. Hops from the Oregon Research Institute in Eugene, OR. I would like to develop a unique understanding of comorbidity issues within the street youth and eventually expand my research into comorbidity issues with adolescents in general.
Specific Aims of the study are: 1) Examine a specific set of variables that potentially lead to substance abuse or suicidality in homeless adolescents. This will be accomplished by empirically testing and validating a "risk amplification" model based upon a set of risk factors that are prevalent with homeless adolescents. 2) Second, we will examine whether drug involvement in homeless adolescents can be described in the same manner as it has for a high school sample of adolescents. Specifically, we will empirically test whether a multidimensional model of drug involvement developed to explicate the substance abuse of domiciled youth can be extrapolated to an extremely high-risk sample of street youth. I will also (1) continue my collaborative work with Drs. Thompson, Baer, Cauce, Hops on studies from their labs/research teams, (2) take courses in quantitative techniques, methodology, developmental psychopathology, and ethics, and (3) develop an R01 based upon the findings from this study.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Descriptors
adolescence (12-20)
homeless
substance abuse epidemiology
substance abuse related behavior
suicide
comorbidity
health disparity
high risk behavior/lifestyle
psychological model
psychometrics
psychopathology
behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
human subject
interview
ProjStart
August 1, 2003
ProjEnd
July 31, 2008
AccessNo
15
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
shua@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study will examine variables that potentially lead to substance abuse or suicidality in homeless adolescents, and will examine whether drug involvement can be described in the same manner for homeless teens as it can for teens in high school.

Title
Driver Improvement Study
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington Traffic Safety Commission
Abstract
An area of growing public concern is aggressive driving or "road rage," a set of behaviors which may range from swearing under one's breath at another driver who has irritated you to running another car off the road or some other form of overt violence. Relatively little is known about those individuals who are involved in the more overt road rage incidents, however it appears that they share a number of personality, attitudinal, and behavioral characteristics with other high-risk drivers, including drivers convicted of DUI. Previous studies have shown that drivers with multiple non-DUI violations are at increased risk for being arrested and convicted for drinking and driving and that they may also be more prone to aggressive driving and road rage. This study, funded by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, has two main objectives: 1) determine the relationship among drinking behavior, driving aggression, and driving behaviors through self-reports collected from an anonymous survey among participants in the Department of Licensing Driver Improvement Program and from the general driving population; and 2) develop, implement, and evaluate a new driver improvement program designed to reduce the likelihood of alcohol-impaired driving and driving aggression.
Categories
Social Policy
AccessNo
16
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
WTSC
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study aims to determine the relationship among drinking behavior, driving aggression, and driving behaviors though the use of self-reports, and then to develop and implement a new driver improvement program designed to reduce drunk driving and driving aggression.

Title
Drug Abuse Epidemiology Reporting Project
ShortName
Drug Surveillance
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
This ongoing project involves the reporting of epidemiology and surveillance activities related to alcohol and other drug abuse trends in Washington state. Relevant data is compiled from a variety of sources for determining alcohol and other drug abuse trends in the state. Other aspects of the project include: development of a network of key informants and data sources in Washington counties; collect, collate and analyze data using both quantitative and qualitative methods; and produce written reports and oral presentations of the results. Data are used to produce the Community Epidemiology Work Group (CEWG) report for Seattle-King County. (funded by DASA in 1st year; subsequently funded by ADAI)
Categories
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
ProjStart
November 2001
ProjEnd
Ongoing
ProjStaff
Jason Williams, PhD
AccessNo
17
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://depts.washington.edu/adai/wa/">Washington Drug Abuse Epidemiology</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ADAI
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/drugsurveillance

Title
ADATSA Five-Year Follow Up Study
PIName
Bill Luchansky, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This project, funded by Washington State's Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, extends previous work on a sample of clients in the ADATSA program who received treatment in 1990-91. The previous work included an examination of the operation of the ADATSA program, and an evaluation of outcomes at 18 months following treatment. The purpose of the five-year follow-up is to examine the long-term outcomes of those clients, including employment outcomes and the utilization and costs of Medicaid services. A further goal is to examine outcomes of selected subgroups of clients, particularly those AFDC recipients and clients recently convicted of a felony.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
18
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
BriefDescrip
This project will follow-up on a sample of clients in the ADATSA program who received treatment in 1990-1991, examining the long-term outcomes of those clients, including employment issues and the utilization and costs of Medicaid services.

Title
ADATSA Integrated Outcome Database
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This project, funded jointly by the Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse (DASA), and a CSAT Technical Assistance grant to DASA, is designed to do two things: first, to build an outcomes database that aggregates data from DASA's TARGET data system with data on outcomes of treatment from other Washington State agencies. Those other data sources include wage data from the Employment Security Department, Medicaid data from Washington State's Medicaid Management Information System, and criminal justice data from the Washington State Patrol and the Department of Corrections. That data will eventually be a tool for a wide range of research projects. The second part of the project is a series of outcomes evaluations that will include not just a sample of the ADATSA population, but the population receiving services from January of 1994 through August of 1997.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
ProjStaff
Luchansky, Bill PhD - Project Director
AccessNo
19
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project aims to build an outcomes database that aggregates data from DASA's TARGET data system with data on outcomes of treatment from other Washington State agencies.

Title
ADATSA Treatment Outcome Evaluation (Project STOP)
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This project is funded by a subcontract from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) through the Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse to develop and implement a follow-up evaluation of publicly-funded clients seeking treatment through the King County Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (ADATSA) Assessment Center. A battery of assessment instruments will be administered to ADATSA clients, who are indigent; parts of the assessment process, which will include the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), will be conducted by DeltaMetrics in Philadelphia in collaboration with researchers from ADAI. Project Stop will provide DASA with information on post-discharge outcomes of ADATSA clients who began their treatment as either inpatients or outpatients.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
ProjStaff
Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe, MSW - Project Manager
AccessNo
20
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
CSAT
DASA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project will develop and implement a follow-up evaluation of publicly-funded clients seeking treatment through the King County Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (ADATSA) Assessment Center.

Title
Alcohol Abuse in Urban Indian Adolescents and Women
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
Caretakers of American Indian youth who meet criteria for a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol dependence are also more likely to experience additional psychiatric illness, most commonly major depression. These findings are particularly true for American Indian women. Clinicians who assess or treat those with alcohol dependence also need to assess and treat or refer patients for depressive or other psychiatric care. This prospective, longitudinal study seeks to identify risk and protective factors associated with alcohol and drug use and abuse and other mental health problems among American Indian youth and women. The project, initiated originally by R. Dale Walker, M.D., has been funded by NIAAA for over nine years.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
21
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study seeks to identify risk and protective factors associated with alcohol and drug use and abuse and other mental health problems among American Indian youth and women.

Title
Alcohol Use and Decompression Sickness in Recreational Divers
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation
Abstract
Although conventional wisdom in recreational scuba diving holds that alcohol consumption increases risk of decompression sickness (DCS), there are no epidemiological data supporting this contention. Because of the very low incidence of decompression sickness, a case-control method is a promising way to study risk factors for DCS. No case-control study of diving injuries in recreational scuba divers has ever been done, and implementing such a study has a number of potential difficulties, including the identification and recruitment of an appropriate control group. This pilot study, funded by the Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation, will test the feasibility of applying procedures from case-control studies of alcohol-related injuries to the study of recreational diving injuries. We will recruit and interview 1) divers treated for DCS; and 2) other divers diving at the same locations. Interviews will include questions about the circumstances of the dive resulting in DCS (for cases) or for the most recent dive (for controls), including alcohol consumption before or after the dive. The pilot study will provide information on a) success of recruitment procedures for cases and controls; b) suitability of interview procedures for accident information and drinking information; and c) sample size requirements for future studies. This information will be used to develop future case-control studies of alcohol use as a risk factor for diving injuries.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
22
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ABMRF
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This pilot study will test the feasibility of applying procedures from case-control studies of alcohol-related injuries to the study of recreational diving injuries.

Title
Alcohol Intervention in a Level-1 Trauma Center
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Director, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
The purpose of this NIAAA-funded study is to determine if incorporating a program of alcohol problem screening, intervention and referral in a trauma center reduces further alcohol related injuries and other morbidities. Alcohol-involved patients at a Level 1 Regional Trauma Center will be randomized into an intervention or control group. Brief motivational enhancement and/or referral to community-based alcohol treatment will be offered to the intervention group. The study will evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention at inducing treatment entry and completion, and in reducing subsequent admissions to hospitals problems. Statewide computerized databases will also be used to assess subsequent health care costs, mortality, motor vehicle crashes and DWI violations. If effective, the proposed intervention may provide an impetus for trauma centers to address alcohol problems as a routine component of care for the injured patient.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
23
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
BriefDescrip
The purpose of this study is to determine if incorporating a program of alcohol problem screening, intervention and referral in a trauma center reduces further alcohol related injuries and other morbidities.

Title
Attrition while Awaiting Drug Treatment (Project START)
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
This NIDA-funded project will study clients who are seeking treatment for substance abuse. Particular focus will be on the problem of clients who are placed on a waiting list for state-supported treatment, but who drop out of the treatment process between their initial assessment and actual treatment entry. Help-seeking behavior, perceived barriers to treatment, and characteristics of those who drop out vs. those who actually enter treatment will be investigated. An "attrition prevention" intervention based on motivational interviewing and group-delivered case management will be designed and evaluated to determine its effectiveness in preventing waiting list drop out. In addition, subsequent use of substance abuse and other social services will be compared between clients who enter treatment vs. those who dropped out before entry. It is expected that the attrition prevention intervention will lead to a reduced rate of attrition from the waiting list, a greater likelihood of completing treatment that has been entered, and a reduced utilization of further services.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
ProjStaff
Rosengren, David PhD - Project Director
AccessNo
24
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project will study clients who are seeking treatment for substance abuse, focusing in particular on the problem of clients who are placed on a waiting list for state-supported treatment, but who drop out of the treatment process between their initial assessment and actual treatment entry.

Title
Computer Modeling of Alcohol Services Research Data
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This NIAAA-funded study will apply computer modeling research methods to study the public alcohol treatment system in Seattle/King County. The goals of the project are to learn more about the patterns of service utilization by clients of public alcohol treatment, and to investigate how best to communicate that information to the agencies responsible for managing the public treatment system so that they may make more informed administrative decisions. The investigators will develop a computerized model of the treatment system which can then be applied to hypothetical management decisions, such as varying patterns of resource allocation, or the introduction of different or new interventions into the treatment system, or when services are organized in a new way. The project will identify the types of service utilization data which are most important for describing the treatment system, and which data will be most useful to the decision makers who manage the system, in turn improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the public alcohol treatment system.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
25
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
BriefDescrip
This study will apply computer modeling research methods to study the public alcohol treatment system in Seattle/King County, looking in particular at patterns of service utilization by clients of public alcohol treatment.

Title
Development and Characteristics of the Managed Care Mental Health Care System in North Sound Regional Support Network
PIName
Linda Brown, RN, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington Institute for Mental Illness Research and Training
Abstract
This study is designed to identify and map the developmental process and organization of the managed mental health care model in North Sound Regional Support Network (NSRSN). Made up of a five-county region (Island, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish and Whatcom counties), the NSRSN has approximately 900,000 residents. The region encompasses a range of geographical areas and kinds of communities including metropolitan, semi-urban, rural, and very remote island areas that are accessible only by ferry. In anticipation of expanded managed care, mental health providers in the region initiated a network to more effectively meet the challenges of developing and implementing a coordinated managed care system. This system, Associated Providers Network (APN), marks the first time that a multi-county group of non-profit provider agencies had organized into a single entity within Washington state. This study, funded by the Washington Institute for Mental Illness Research and Training, will identify and map the development and implementation of the organization structure, service delivery processes, quality management, and data systems of the APN, as well as develop blueprints that can be used in other mental health regions of the state. An additional purpose of the study is to provide information for a second stage study focused more specifically on issues of access, treatment packages, and client outcomes.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
26
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
WIMIRT
BriefDescrip
This study is designed to identify and map the developmental process and organization of the managed mental health care model in North Sound Regional Support Network (NSRSN).

Title
Domestic Violence among Pregnant Substance Abusers
PIName
Jeanette Norris, PhD
PITitle
Senior Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
In this study for DASA, the researchers will furnish pilot data documenting the extent of domestic violence as an issue in the treatment of pregnant and postpartum substance abusers. Women in residential and outpatient treatment programs will be interviewed about domestic violence to provide descriptive information about the relationships between domestic violence and other variables related to treatment. The ultimate goal of the study is to aid in the development of more effective treatment strategies for pregnant and postpartum substance abusing women.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
27
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
norris@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
In this study, the researchers will furnish pilot data documenting the extent of domestic violence as an issue in the treatment of pregnant and postpartum substance abusers.

Title
Evaluation Plan for Adolescent Detox
PIName
Peggy L. Peterson, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This DASA-funded study is a formative evaluation of detox and crisis stabilization services for adolescents in the state of Washington. Eight agencies in the state provide detox/crisis stabilization services which provide a safe, temporary protective environment for at-risk/runaway youth who are experiencing harmful effects and/or withdrawal from alcohol and other drugs. These programs also assist in the referral, access, admission and completion of chemical dependency assessment and treatment for adolescents. Investigators will interview program staff of detox/crisis stabilization services and review client record information to learn 1) to what extent are the programs meeting their goals; 2) program implementation barriers and problems experienced by the service provider agencies; and 3) ways to improve the programs.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
28
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
BriefDescrip
This study is a formative evaluation of detox and crisis stabilization services for adolescents in the state of Washington.

Title
Matching Patients to Alcoholism Treatments: Seattle CRU
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This study, a component of the multi-site Project MATCH funded by NIAAA, aims to test the "matching hypothesis" that alcohol treatment effectiveness can be increased by assigning clients with certain characteristics to particular treatments. Currently in year eight, the project (1) tests primary and secondary a priori matching hypothesis over the course of 15 months of follow-up, (2) conducts psychometric and other analyses of patient, treatment process, and outcome variables to test these matching hypotheses, (3) examines alternative analytic strategies and variables for testing matching, and (4) determines the extent to which matching effects persist over a three year period following treatment completion.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
29
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study, a component of the multi-site Project MATCH funded by NIAAA, aims to test the "matching hypothesis" that alcohol treatment effectiveness can be increased by assigning clients with certain characteristics to particular treatments.

Title
Methadone Maintenance in Primary Care
PIName
Joseph O. Merrill, MD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
Methadone maintenance treatment of heroin addiction has been found to be effective in reducing drug use, enhancing social productivity, and preventing the spread of infectious diseases, yet strict regulatory policies, budget constraints and social stigmatization have limited access to methadone. The emergence of AIDS among injection drug users, and an accelerating HIV epidemic among injection drug users in nearby Vancouver, B.C. has added urgency to the search for policies and programs that improve access and lower the cost of methadone treatment in Washington State. One identified policy response is the implementation of "medical maintenance" - providing methadone through community physicians outside traditional drug treatment programs. The purpose of this research is to use the planned development and implementation of a pilot medical maintenance program in King County, Washington as an opportunity to study the policy barriers, physician training challenges, and patient safety and acceptability concerns that must be resolved for such programs to be widely replicated.
Methadone maintenance treatment is a highly regulated and controversial activity, and any effort to improve access to methadone services must respond to the numerous federal, state and local regulatory interests, as well as medical and community concerns. Phase I of this project will study a broadly inclusive policy development process as it defines the structure and protocols for a pilot medical maintenance program. Research using key informant interviews and a consensus meeting process will assist others as they approach the regulatory, administrative and political obstacles to, and opportunities for, medical maintenance.
The regulatory history of methadone has led to a centralized treatment system, difficult to expand and isolated from mainstream medical care. Physicians who plan to care for methadone maintenance patients must overcome the lack of education and experience associated with this isolation. Phase II of this project will develop and conduct a physician training program and an ongoing clinical support system, and evaluate its effects on physician knowledge and attitudes.
Phase III of this project will implement the medical maintenance model defined in Phase I as a small feasibility pilot program. Patients will transfer their methadone maintenance treatment to a primary care medical setting, keeping close ties to the traditional methadone treatment program. Data documenting patient addiction severity, service utilization, and patient safety handling methadone will be collected, as will patient, provider, and program staff satisfaction information. This will assure the safety and feasibility of a medical maintenance model, and provide pilot data and estimates of key parameters necessary to the design of a randomized trial of medical maintenance.
Integrating methadone maintenance and primary medical care is a concrete step toward both improved access to methadone treatment and coordination of treatment services for drug users. It will also increase physicians' knowledge and experience concerning methadone treatment and substance abuse issues more broadly. Finally, it begins to address the isolation and stigma that have prevented methadone treatment from reaching its full potential.

Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
30
Status
Completed Projects
BriefDescrip
The purpose of this research is to use the planned development and implementation of a pilot "medical maintenance program" (providing methadone through community physicians outside traditional treatment programs) in King County, Washington as an opportunity to study the policy barriers, physician training challenges, and patient safety and acceptability concerns that must be resolved for such programs to be widely replicated.

Title
Motivational Enhancement to Reduce Risk of Street Youth
PIName
Peggy L. Peterson, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
Street youth constitute a group of adolescents at high risk for alcohol problems. Although the high level of substance use risk among street youth has been documented, and alcohol use is known to increase risks for trauma and continued street life, few interventions have been developed for this population. The proposed four year study will develop and test a brief motivational enhancement intervention tailored to street youth. The goals of the intervention are to increase motivation to change alcohol and drug risk behavior, increase alcohol and drug-related help-seeking behavior, and to reduce alcohol and drug risk. The intervention is guided by the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change (Prochaska and DiClemente, 1983). In short, we propose a brief, motivational intervention aimed at facilitating contemplation of change. The intervention uses personalized feedback on risk behavior and non-confrontational clinical interviewing techniques to encourage young adolescents without stable living environments to consider treatment for alcohol problems, question social influences, and make use of available social services. A sample of 240 youth -- stratified by age, gender, and ethnicity -- will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: Motivational Enhancement treatment (ME) or assessment only (AO). Follow-up interviews will be conducted at one-month (immediate post-test) and three-months post-treatment and will assess stage of change for heavy alcohol and drug use, attitudes and social norms, social network characteristics, quantity and frequency of alcohol and drug use, alcohol and drug use consequences, help seeking, and treatment services utilization. We hypothesize that compared to youth in the AO condition, youth in the ME condition will: a) show greater change in motivation to reduce alcohol and drug risk as evidenced by movement in stage of change; b) show greater change in attitudes and social norms favorable to reducing alcohol and drug risk; c) show greater reduction in use quantity and patterns of risky use of alcohol and other drugs; and d) engage in more help-seeking behavior for alcohol and other drug use.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
31
Status
Completed Projects
BriefDescrip
This project seeks to develop and test a brief motivational enhancement intervention tailored to street youth that will focus on increasing motivation to change alcohol and drug risk behavior, increasing alcohol and drug-related help-seeking behavior, and decreasing alcohol and drug risk.

Title
Pioneer Center North Evaluation
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
This study, funded by the Mental Health Division of Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services, studies outcomes from the Dual Diagnosis Program and the Chemical Dependency Involuntary Treatment Program at Pioneer Center North. The goals of this research are: (1) to assess the use of community and institutional services for individuals in these two treatment programs both before and after treatment, (2) to assess the impact of maintaining community linkages during treatment on subsequent use of community services, (3) to assess the rates of contact with law enforcement for individuals in these programs both before and after treatment at the facilities, (4) to assess the cost of maintaining individuals in the community both before and after treatment for those who have completed treatment, ( 5) to identify the data elements in the TARGET and MHD's Management Information System that could be used to produce indices of the desired outcome measure over time, and (6) to identify elements that are necessary for these measures of outcomes, but missing from existing data sets.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
32
Status
Completed Projects
BriefDescrip
This study will examine and assess outcomes from the Dual Diagnosis Program and the Chemical Dependency Involuntary Treatment Program at Pioneer Center North.

Title
SSI Project Evaluation
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This project is funded by a contract from DASA to evaluate a program which monitors persons who receive Supplemental Security Income benefits (SSI) from the federal Social Security Administration for disability due to alcohol or drug abuse problems. The monitoring agency assesses recipients of SSI who have alcohol or other drug abuse problems, then refers them to appropriate chemical dependency treatment, vocational rehabilitation, and/or mental health programs. SSI benefits are paid to designated "payees" on behalf of the client, to either "professional payees," (SSA-approved payees, project payees, or treatment centers), or "non-professional payees," who may be friends, relatives or have some other relationship with the client. Four questions are addressed in the evaluation: How effective are the outreach efforts in reaching qualified clients? Do monitored clients have better outcomes than those who are not monitored? Do more intense levels of monitoring result in better client outcomes? and Do clients with professional payees have better short-term outcomes (including treatment compliance) than clients with non-professional payees?
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
33
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
BriefDescrip
This project will evaluate a program which monitors persons who receive Supplemental Security Income benefits (SSI) from the federal Social Security Administration for disability due to alcohol or drug abuse problems.

Title
Treatment of At-Risk Drinkers in Primary Care
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Director, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This NIAAA-funded project will conduct a randomized trial in a population of at-risk drinkers to evaluate the impact of interventions consisting of physician-delivered self- help materials, written personalized feedback, and supportive telephone counseling. Drinkers' readiness to change, their motivations across stages of changes, and self-help interventions which are hypothesized to mediate change will be studied, as will changes in the knowledge, practices and confidence of physicians regarding treating at-risk drinkers. The long term goal is to develop a protocol for identifying and treating at-risk drinkers in a primary health care system.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
34
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
BriefDescrip
This project will conduct a randomized trial in a population of at-risk drinkers to evaluate the impact of interventions consisting of physician-delivered self-help materials, written personalized feedback, and supportive telephone counseling.

Title
Treatment Outcomes of DASA Clients
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This study, funded by the Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse (DASA) will develop an on-going treatment follow-up system of publicly-funded substance abuse clients. The system to be developed by the project will provide DASA with information on post-discharge outcomes of clients. Outcomes to be measured by the study include: employment and earnings, physical health (especially use of emergency rooms), mental/psychological condition (especially inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations ), arrests, substance use, and school performance.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
ProjStaff
Carney, Molly PhD - Project Director
AccessNo
35
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study will develop an on-going treatment follow-up system of publicly-funded substance abuse clients.

Title
Brief Substance Abuse Treatment for Homeless Adolescents (STARRS)
ShortName
STARRS
PIName
John S. Baer, PhD
PITitle
Research Associate Professor
PIDept
Psychology
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
R01DA015751
Abstract
Homeless youth constitute a group of adolescents at high risk for substance use disorders and associated psychosocial consequences, yet few interventions have been developed for this population. In response to PA-99-107, NIDA Behavioral Therapies Development Program, this application seeks support for a Stage I developmental project. The research program will develop and test a brief motivational enhancement and service-linking intervention tailored to the special needs of homeless youth. Social structures that have strong influence on adolescent behavior (such as families and schools) are not typically available for intervention. Most youth are not seeking substance abuse treatment. Youth also suffer from high rates of trauma, psychiatric co-morbidity, poverty, and victimization. The intervention will be guided by the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change (Prochaska and DiClemente, 1983). We propose to develop a brief, motivational and service linking intervention aimed at facilitating contemplation of change and use of available services. The intervention will be conducted over several individual meetings over a period of one month. Counselors will provide personalized feedback on substance use behavior and social network relations, use non-confrontational clinical interviewing techniques (Motivational Interviewing), and provide vouchers to encourage participation. The intervention is proposed to be conducted with youth who are not seeking treatment, and to be conducted and integrated with additional services within a local agency. The goals of the intervention will be to encourage homeless adolescents to question social influences about substance use, question assumptions about drug effects, consider treatment for drug problems, and make use of available social services. An initial period of funding will be used to develop a pilot intervention drawing from brief interventions tested with adults and adolescents, and to complete process analyses of service utilization among homeless adolescents. Subsequently, a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 100 youth-stratified by age and gender, will be randomly assigned to Motivational Enhancement treatment (ME) or Treatment as Usual (TAU). TAU includes drop-in programs (hygiene, food, material assistance, and case management). Follow-up interviews at one- and three-months post-treatment, will assess substance use, stage of change, and service utilization.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Descriptors
adolescence (12-20)
behavior therapy
drug abuse therapy
health care service utilization
homeless
human therapy evaluation
motivation
alcoholism/alcohol abuse therapy
medically underserved population
self help
social support network
substance abuse related behavior
behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
health services research tag
human subject
ProjStart
September 30, 2002
ProjEnd
June 30, 2008
ProjStaff
Sharon Garrett (Project Director), Bryan Hartzler (Co-Investigator), Jennifer Mullane (Interviewer / Interventionist), Melissa Phares (Interviewer / Interventionist)
Results
Baer JS, Beadnell B, Garrett SB, Hartzler B, Wells EA, Peterson PL. Adolescent change language within a brief motivational intervention and substance use outcomes. Psychol Addict Behav 2008;22(4):570-575. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2605642/"> Full text PMC2605642</a>
AccessNo
39
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
jsbaer@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This research program evaluated a brief motivational enhancement and service-linking intervention tailored to the special needs of homeless youth. The intervention was aimed at encouraging them to question social influences and assumptions about substance use, to consider treatment for drug problems, and to make use of available social services.

Title
Inventory of Evidence-Based Practices for Treating Substance Use Disorders
ShortName
EBP (Intervention Inventory)
PIName
Nancy Sutherland, MLS
PITitle
Associate Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
The availability of empirically supported clinical practices and interventions for the treatment of substance use disorders has increased as research moves from tightly controlled studies in the laboratory to community treatment settings. As empirically validated, manual-based approaches grow in number, it becomes more difficult for addiction professionals and policy makers to stay informed about the variety of practices with proven efficacy for use with different client populations and drug problems.
The EBP Substance Abuse web site and database is designed to help treatment providers make informed decisions about which science-based practices are most appropriate in which circumstances for which individuals.
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
March 1, 2004
ProjEnd
June 30, 2004
ProjStaff
Meg Brunner, MLIS
Lynn McIntosh
AccessNo
41
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/ebp">EBP Website</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
nsutherland@adai.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The EBP Substance Abuse web site and database is designed to help treatment providers make informed decisions about which science-based practices are most appropriate in which circumstances for which individuals.

Title
Snohomish County Drug Court Implementation Grant Evaluation
ShortName
Sno County Drug Court
PIName
Megan J. Rutherford, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Superior Court, Snohomish County, WA
Abstract
This project will help evaluate a juvenile drug court in Snohomish County, Washington. The researchers will create a survey form and database of information about the youth who are involved in the drug court. Types of information to be documented include demographic data, treatment admission, services received, treatment compliance, sanctions and incentives, and exit from the drug court system.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
January 01, 2005
ProjEnd
December 31, 2006
AwardAmt
$50,000 ($25,000 / yr)
AccessNo
43
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
Snohomish County, WA
PIEmail
mruthfrd@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project will help evaluate a juvenile drug court in Snohomish County, Washington. The researchers will create a survey form and database of information about the youth who are involved in the drug court.

Title
Becca Bill Evaluation
PIName
Peggy L. Peterson, PhD, MPH
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
Funded by the Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, this study will provide DASA with an evaluation of children/adolescents served and programs providing them chemical dependency treatment under the auspices of the At Risk/Runaway Youth Act ("Becca Bill",; Bill 6493). The evaluation will be based on an analysis of program implementation, client/program assessment, and data contained in DASA's management information system (TARGET).
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
44
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
BriefDescrip
This study will provide DASA with an evaluation of children/adolescents served and programs providing them chemical dependency treatment under the auspices of the At Risk/Runaway Youth Act ("Becca Bill",; Bill 6493).

Title
Descriptive Study of TASC Felony Services in Washington State
PIName
Linda Brown, RN, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
Treatment Alternatives to Street Crimes (TASC) Felony Services programs were developed in the early 70's in response to a growing recognition of the relationship between drug abuse and crime, and the potential of treatment to reduce drug-related crime. TASC programs were designed to provide services to drug dependent, adult felony offenders that would facilitate community based treatment, decrease drug abuse, criminal activity and incarceration, and link the criminal justice system and drug treatment systems. In Washington state, responsibility for TASC programs, which began with federal and then state law enforcement funding, moved to the state Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services in 1998. This DASA-funded study will describe TASC Felony Services in six counties of Washington state in order that DASA may more completely evaluate the organization and functioning of TASC programs. Descriptions will include the philosophy, mission and goals, and the organization of each program; program relationships with their respective communities and the criminal justice system; and an overview of the services provided to include examination of several specific aspects. Similarities and differences among the programs and the issues they each face will be identified and examined.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
45
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
BriefDescrip
This study will describe Treatment Alternatives to Street Crimes (TASC) Felony Services in six counties of Washington state in order that DASA may more completely evaluate the organization and functioning of TASC programs.

Title
Distinguishing Characteristics of High-BAC DWI Offenders
PIName
Brent L. Baxter, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation
Abstract
This study, supported by the Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation, focuses on DWI offenders who have particularly high blood alcohol levels (BAC) at the time of arrest, especially those who do so repeatedly. These high-BAC drivers, presumed to be alcoholic, are compared to other DWI arrestees with respect to several factors: official response to the DWI offense as indicated by the legal disposition of the case; drivers' subsequent traffic crashes and non-alcohol traffic offenses; and specific features of the traffic crashes of high-BAC drivers. Characteristics of arrested low-BAC drivers will also be investigated to determine their likelihood of DWI recidivism at high-BAC levels.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
46
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ABMRF
BriefDescrip
This study focuses on DWI offenders who have particularly high blood alcohol levels (BAC) at the time of arrest, especially those who do so repeatedly.

Title
Histories of Fatal-Collision Drinking-Drivers: Patterns among Adults and Youth
PIName
Brent L. Baxter, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington Traffic Safety Commission
Abstract
This study, funded by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, was designed to provide insight into the effectiveness of various responses to drunken driving by reconstructing the fatal traffic collisions and driving histories of drivers responsible for alcohol-related traffic fatalities. Using Washington State Patrol data on traffic collisions, the study provided analyses of driver and collision characteristics, as well as the prior collision histories, of all 230 alcohol-impaired drivers involved in fatal collisions in Washington State in 1994. Special focus was placed on comparing adult drivers with younger drivers.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
47
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
WTSC
BriefDescrip
This study was designed to provide insight into the effectiveness of various responses to drunken driving by reconstructing the fatal traffic collisions and driving histories of drivers responsible for alcohol-related traffic fatalities.

Title
NW High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Drug Court Evaluation
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This project will conduct a statewide evaluation of the drug court programs in Washington State for the Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse. Part I of the study will look at how clients get into the court, how the court provides supervision and monitoring of their participation in treatment, the treatment and other services the clients get, and how the court and treatment systems work together. The second part of the study will concentrate on the impact of participation in drug courts on the clients. Researchers will gather information about arrests, incarceration, employment, and use of other resources like medical care, mental health services, substance abuse treatment, and income support programs. The study will compare outcomes for three groups of offenders who are referred to drug courts: those who complete a drug court program, those who enter but fail to complete (drop-outs), and those who are offered entry to the program but decline to enroll (opt-outs).
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
48
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
gbcox@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project will conduct a statewide evaluation of the drug court programs in Washington State for the Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse.

Title
Alcohol's Influence on Women's Cognitive Appraisals of Sexual Assault Risk and Subsequent Responses
PIName
Jeanette Norris, PhD
PITitle
Senior Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
Sexual assault by acquaintances is a serious problem for young women. Approximately 1 in 4 experience either rape or attempted rape, the overwhelming majority of which are committed by acquaintances. Alcohol consumption by the victim, assailant or both is involved in more than half. One key element of sexual assault prevention is early perception of risk, which enables women to respond effectively and extricate herself from the situation before it escalates. In assessing risk and responding to it, women make a series of primary and secondary cognitive appraisals. Primary appraisals are those directed specifically to acknowledging and assessing the level of risk in a particular situation. Secondary appraisals involve weighing the potential to respond effectively against psychological barriers preventing effective responding. Both women's own alcohol consumption and their perception of the assailant's consumption can affect this cognitive appraisal process. Theoretical models of cognitive appraisal and coping and response conflict related to alcohol consumption provide the foundation for the proposed work. One experiment will investigate alcohol's physiological effects on women's primary and secondary cognitive appraisals to a sexual assault scenario and subsequent responses. In addition to women's alcohol consumption, manipulated variables include the level of prior relationship between the woman and the assailant and the assailant's alcohol consumption. This work will provide important information about how women's alcohol consumption affects perception of risk and subsequent responding to it. Findings have implications for designing prevention interventions, especially related to alcohol's role as a risk factor for sexual assault.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
49
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ADAI
PIEmail
norris@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This work aims to provide important information about how women's alcohol consumption affects perception of risk and subsequent responding to it.

Title
Community-Based Study of Gay Men, HIV, and Drugs
PIName
Michael E. Gorman, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
This study, funded by NIDA, uses ethnographic methods including focus groups, observation and structured interviewing to describe ways in which methamphetamine use contributes to HIV risk through injection drug use and unprotected sex. This exploratory study conducts interviews with homosexually active methamphetamine injectors in Seattle in order to:
Describe factors influencing the natural history of methamphetamine injection among homosexually active men (MSMs);
Characterize and describe common behaviors and social patterns which provide the contexts for this drug use regarding unprotected sex and needle sharing;
Describe preliminary typologies of social networks of MSM methamphetamine injectors and determine whether common injection patterns link gay and bisexual men with heterosexual men and women via sex and/or injection;
Identify intervention points so as to inform the development of prevention and intervention strategies targeted to MSMs who use methamphetamines.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
50
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
BriefDescrip
This study will use ethnographic methods (including focus groups, observation, and structured interviewing) to describe ways in which methamphetamine use contributes to HIV risk through injection drug use and unprotected sex.

Title
Daily Event Analysis of Alcohol/Drug Use and Risky Sex
PIName
Mary L. Gillmore, PhD
PITitle
Professor, Social Work
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This study seeks to understand the nature of the relationship between substance use (alcohol and drugs) and sexual risk taking in four groups of persons believed to be at risk of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STD). The four groups are: adolescents and adults attending a public health STD clinic, university students, and gay men attending the STD clinic or an AIDS prevention project. The study also seeks to determine which method, either daily diaries or daily telephone interviews, is best for obtaining daily event data on risky behaviors. The ultimate aim of the study is to provide useful data for AIDS education and prevention efforts.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
July 1994
ProjEnd
June 2000
ProjStaff
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH (ADAI Senior Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
51
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=2732443&icde=5969888"><NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA

Title
Enhancing Recall of Sexual and Drug Injection Partners
PIName
Devon D. Brewer, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
Individuals are asked to recall their sexual and drug injection partners in interviews for HIV partner notification and social network research on HIV transmission. Research suggests that the recall of this information may be incomplete, which may hamper efforts to understand and prevent HIV transmission. The first phase of this NIDA-funded project is a study to estimate the magnitude of the incompleteness of recall of sexual and drug injection partners, identify the factors involved with not naming partners, and describe patterns in the recall of partners. In the second project phase, the results from the first study will be used to develop and pilot test different recall strategies and cues for enhancing recall of partners. Promising recall strategies and cues will be included in a systematic interview procedure for enhancing recall of sexual and drug injection partners. In the final phase of the project, the effectiveness of this new procedure will be evaluated in partner notification and social network research contexts. Subjects for all three phases will be recruited from a large study of drug injectors in Seattle and the largest clinic for HIV testing and counseling in the Seattle metropolitan area.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
ProjStaff
Sharon Garrett (Research Consultant)
AccessNo
52
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIBioSite
http://faculty.washington.edu/ddbrewer/
BriefDescrip
This study will begin by estimating the magnitude of the incompleteness of recall of sexual and drug injection partners, identifying the factors involved with not naming partners and describing patterns in recall. It will then use the results to develop, pilot test, and evaluate different strategies and cues for enhancing recall of partners.

Title
HIV, Drugs, and Sexual Risk in DUMSMs: A Community Study
PIName
Michael E. Gorman, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
Men who have sex with men and who abuse drugs (DUMSM) have not received the same research attention as other drug users. In light of alarmingly high HIV seroprevalence among this hidden and multifaceted population, especially among DUMSM who inject drugs, this ethnographic study in metropolitan Seattle, Washington seeks to better understand this high risk group. The study will focus in particular on the use of methamphetamines among this population and its correlation with HIV infection. This study builds on the findings of an earlier exploratory study, and especially on the directions for community prevention research which have emerged from that project.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
53
Status
Completed Projects
BriefDescrip
The study will focus on the use of methamphetamines among drug-using men who have sex with men (DUMSM) and its correlation with HIV infection.

Title
HIV, Hepatitis, STD and Reproductive Health Risk Behaviors among Female Seattle Methamphetamine Users
PIName
Michael E. Gorman, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
UW Center for AIDS Research
Abstract
Methamphetamine use has increased rapidly in the Seattle area and in other regions of the U.S. in recent years. Within the growing epidemic, women appear to be at increased risk for both methamphetamine use and HIV, as indicated by rising treatment admissions (a 1240% increase between 1992 and 1998). This project, funded by the UW Center for AIDS Research, expands on earlier research by collecting data on 25 female methamphetamine users in Seattle. Participants will be interviewed about their drug use patterns, sexual behavior, reproductive health and risk, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and other STD risk behavior, and quality of life including the presence of violence. The study will provide a profile of female methamphetamine users that could support the generation of effective intervention strategies.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
54
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
UWCAR
BriefDescrip
This project will expand on earlier research by collecting data on 25 female methamphetamine users in Seattle and compiling a profile that could support the generation of effective intervention strategies.

Title
Interviewer Factors in the Elicitation of HIV Risk Networks
PIName
Devon D. Brewer, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
Social network studies of HIV transmission and partner notification disease control activities are crucial for understanding and preventing transmission of HIV and other infections. Both efforts involve the elicitation of HIV risk network data (i.e., names of and other information about specific sexual and drug injection partners). The success of these efforts in providing insight on and controlling the spread of HIV depends heavily on the completeness, reliability, and validity of these self-reported, recall-based data. Research shows that the recall of sexual and injection partners is substantially incomplete. The overall goal of this small grant project is to improve interviewing procedures and techniques to maximize the completeness, reliability, and validity of recall-based data on sexual and drug injection partners in both research and partner notification contexts. This project focuses on the interviewing situation, including interviewer characteristics and interviewer behaviors, as it influences the quality and quantity of HIV risk network data elicited. The project consists of three main activities: 1) examination of interviewer effects on the completeness and reliability of HIV risk network data in secondary analysis of three extensive data sets (from two research studies and one data base of partner notification records); 2) qualitative description of the interviewing techniques used by veteran Disease Intervention Specialists (DIS) in their partner notification interviews; and 3) a randomized controlled trial of supplementary interviewing techniques and procedures, based in part on the results of the first two activities, for enhancing recall of sexual and drug injection partners in a partner notification context.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
55
Status
Completed Projects
PIBioSite
http://faculty.washington.edu/ddbrewer/
BriefDescrip
The project seeks to improve interviewing procedures and techniques to maximize the completeness, reliability, and validity of recall-based data on sexual and drug injection partners in both research and partner notification contexts.

Title
Neuronal Mediation of Ethanol-Induced Taste Aversions
PIName
Todd Thiele, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This study, funded as a Career Development Award by NIAAA, is designed to examine the neurochemical pathways that mediate the aversive properties to alcohol and alcohol-induced conditioned taste aversions (CTA). Previous research, using cFos-like immunoreactivity (cFLI) as an indication of cellular activation, has shown that the brainstem regions thought to be involved in taste aversion learning (particularly, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS)) are activated by alcohol and by tastes that have been paired with this drug. Proposed experiments are designed to assess the following questions about the cellular activity in the brainstem associated with alcohol administration and CTA expression:
What are the sources of neuronal input to the brainstem which cause this cellular activation? To examine this question, electrolytic lesions will be made in specific brain regions and subsequent effects on cFLI in the NTS will be assessed.
What is the neurochemical phenotype of cells in the brainstem that are activated by alcohol and by tastes paired with alcohol? Double-labeling procedures with in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry will be used to examine this question.
What neurotransmitters and receptors are responsible for mediating this cellular activity in the NTS? This question will be addressed by using specific receptor antagonists and receptor autoradiography.
Because the aversive properties of drugs can modulate their intake, and because so little is known about the physiological processes that mediate these effects, findings from the present research will likely benefit the research community, and the clinical community, involved with substance abuse treatment and prevention.
Categories
Pre-Clinical Research
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
56
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
BriefDescrip
This study is designed to examine the neurochemical pathways that mediate the aversive properties to alcohol and alcohol-induced conditioned taste aversions (CTA).

Title
Role of Neuropeptide Y in Ethanol Consumption
PIName
Todd Thiele, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
A recent quantitative trait loci (QTL) study with a selectively-bred rat model of alcoholism indicated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may be involved with ethanol consumption. High alcohol drinking rats were found to have below average brain levels of NPY. To assess the role of NPY in ethanol consumption, my collaborators and I examined ethanol intake in NPY knockout mice and in transgenic mice that over-express NPY. We found that NPY knockout mice drank more ethanol relative to wild-type mice, and were more resistant to the sedative/hypnotic effects produced by this drug. On the other hand, NPY over-expressing mice drank less ethanol relative to wild-type mice, and were more sensitive to the sedative/hypnotic effects of this drug. Together, our results indicate that ethanol consumption and resistance are inversely related to NPY levels (Nature (1998), 396:366-369). These findings have prompted an exploration of the mechanisms by which NPY influences ethanol intake. For example, to identify the receptor responsible for this effect, we recently found that mice lacking the Y5 receptor, unlike NPY knockout mice, show normal ethanol intake suggesting that the Y5 receptor does not mediate NPY's effects on ethanol. Next mutant mice lacking either the Y1 or Y2 receptor will be examined. Other important questions to address include:
In what brain regions does NPY act to influence ethanol drinking?
Does NPY mediate the rewarding and/or aversive effects of ethanol?
Does NPY regulate consumption of other drugs?
Is NPY expression regulated by ethanol?
Are other neuropeptides that function as neuromodulators also involved with voluntary ethanol consumption?
Categories
Pre-Clinical Research
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
57
Status
Completed Projects
BriefDescrip
Previous research has indicated that ethanol consumption and resistance are inversely related to neuropeptide Y (NPY) levels in the brain. These project aims to further explore the mechanism by which NPY influences ethanol intake.

Title
SSI Battelle
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
Funded by DASA, this project has two primary aims: 1) to estimate the impact of the Contract with America Advancement Act, which terminated the Social Security Administration's Disability Insurance (DI) and Supplemental Insurance (SSI) benefits for persons diagnosed with substance abuse problems; and 2) to estimate based on findings from Aim 1, the economic impact of the benefits termination on federal, state, and local government resources for the people denied these benefits as a whole and in subgroups. ADAI will be responsible for building and documenting the analytic data base that will be used in determining outcomes for former recipients of these benefits.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
58
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
gbcox@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project aims to estimate the termination, via the Contract with America Advancement Act, of Social Security's Disability Insurance and Supplemental Insurance benefits for persons diagnosed with substance abuse problems. It will then estimate the economic impact of those benefits terminations on federal, state, and local government resources for those affected.

Title
Substance Abuse Prevention in the Elderly: Review of the Literature
PIName
Katherine A. Carlson, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This DASA-funded project is based on a comprehensive review of the scholarly and professional literature on prevention of substance misuse and abuse among the elderly. The resulting literature review documents the extent of the use of alcohol, other licit and illicit drugs among this underserved population, and their effects, with particular attention to the relation between drug effects and behavioral, psychopharmacological, physiological, and other factors that may put elderly persons at risk for substance misuse or abuse. The review identified components of prevention and treatment strategies likely to be effective with elderly persons and makes recommendations for their implementation. Finally, collected programmatic and informational materials from other states and government sources were reviewed to provide a solid knowledge base for planning of services.
Categories
Prevention Research
ProjStart
01-Jan-1994
ProjEnd
31-Dec-1994
Results
Carlson, Katherine A. <a href="http://adai.washington.edu/pubs/reports/elderly.pdf">The Prevention of Substance Abuse and Misuse Among the Elderly: Review of the Literature and Strategies for Prevention</a>. Seattle: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, University of Washington, September 1994.
Notes
Dr. Carlson is no longer on the staff of ADAI.
AccessNo
59
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA

Title
Co-Occurring Disorders
PIName
Gary B. Cox, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
What are the implications for medium-term outcomes of the co-occurrence or mental illness and alcohol or other substance abuse among consumers of public substance abuse and mental health services? In this case, outcomes will be measured by the utilization of medical services and public substance abuse and mental health services. Subjects will consist of all patients discharged from Western State Hospital in the calendar year 1996. They will be categorized based on discharge diagnoses into four groups: mental illness diagnoses only; substance abuse diagnoses only; substance abuse plus Axis I mental illness; and substance abuse plus other Axis II mental illness. These groups will be compared on utilization of public substance abuse services, and other medical service utilization over subsequent years. Data will be obtained from three DSHS sources: the Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, the Mental Health Division, and the Medical Assistance Administration. All data will be derived from administrative data sets, so there will be no contact with subjects, nor will any additional data be collected specifically for the purpose of this study. Various data analyses will be performed and the groups compared on treatment admission and re-admission patterns, and on patterns of utilization of services. The results will be used to inform planners and policy makers about whether clients with co-occurring disorders of these types require special treatment programs.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
60
Status
Completed Projects
PIEmail
gbcox@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_cox
BriefDescrip
The goal of this project is to determine the implications for medium-term outcomes of the co-occurrence of mental illness and alcohol or other substance abuse among consumers of public substance abuse and mental health services.

Title
Evaluation of the Adolescent Treatment Enhancement Project
PIName
Megan J. Rutherford, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
King County Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division
Abstract
Funded by King County Mental Health, Chemical Abuse & Dependency Services Division, on Evaluation of the Adolescent Treatment Enhancement Project, this project will implement enhanced treatment capacity for 200 adolescents who are involved in the juvenile justice system, or who are at high risk for involvement, and who are members of one of five special populations: Hispanic/Latino, Asian, African-American, Native American, or sexual minority. The purpose of the project is to increase the number of youth from these special population groups who are offered effective treatment as an alternative to juvenile justice sanctions. The project will document the contribution of increased attention and resources to outreach and engagement-focused case management to increased treatment referrals, enrollment, engagement and retention for the special populations served. It will demonstrate that such young people can be offered treatment in lieu of juvenile justice sanctions with positive outcomes. It will further demonstrate the benefit of explicitly providing multicultural alliance and leadership opportunities for these young people and the degree to which these measures can improve treatment retention and recovery.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
61
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
KCMHCADSD
PIEmail
mruthfrd@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_rutherford
BriefDescrip
This project will implement enhanced treatment capacity for 200 adolescents who are involved in the juvenile justice system, or who are at high risk for involvement, and who are members of one of five special populations: Hispanic/Latino, Asian, African-American, Native American, or sexual minority.

Title
Kitsap Outcome Evaluation
PIName
Megan J. Rutherford, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
This project will expand the previous outcome evaluation study for the Kitsap County Adult and Juvenile Court, to include a process evaluation for juvenile drug court and an outcome evaluation for adult drug court. The outcome evaluation will assess clients' reduction in recidivism, reduction in substance use, improvement in other areas of life functioning, and the relationships of these outcomes to the structure of the treatment and court program.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
62
Status
Completed Projects
PIEmail
mruthfrd@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_rutherford
BriefDescrip
This project will expand the previous outcome evaluation study for the Kitsap County Adult and Juvenile Court, to include a process evaluation for juvenile drug court and an outcome evaluation for adult drug court.

Title
Outcome Analyses of Persons in Chemical Dependency Treatment
PIName
Brent L. Baxter, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
This set of studies was conducted for Washington State's Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse (DASA) to assess the effectiveness of chemical dependency treatment in Washington State. Through analyses using individual-level data from DASA's "TARGET" management information system, the studies examined changes in clients' lifestyles occurring between treatment admission and discharge. Outcome variables included substance use, employment status, criminal justice involvement, health-services utilization, residential status and public assistance. These studies included the following:
Inpatient/Outpatient Treatment: Analyses of inpatient/outpatient treatment outcomes were based on a sample of 3066 clients discharged from publicly-supported inpatient or outpatient chemical dependency treatment (excluding opiate-substitution treatment) in Washington State between July 1, 1995 and November 30, 1995. Findings presented included those for selected subgroups of clients, including adult, youth, ADATSA recipients, pregnant/parenting women, and clients completing treatment.
Opiate-Substitution Treatment: Analyses of opiate-substitution treatment outcomes were based on a sample of 1698 clients admitted to opiate-substitution treatment in Washington State between July 1, 1993 and June 30, 1996 and discharged from treatment by mid-October 1996. Findings were presented for both publicly-funded and private-pay clients, and for each of the ten opiate-substitution treatment providers.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
63
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_baxter
BriefDescrip
This project aims to assess the effectiveness of chemical dependency treatment in Washington State through analyses of individual-level data from DASA's "TARGET" management information system.

Title
Chemical Dependency Disposition Alternative
ShortName
CDDA
PIName
Megan J. Rutherford, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration
Abstract
Under a contract from Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) and the Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA), researchers from ADAI will evaluate the state's new Chemical Dependency Disposition Alternative (CDDA) program, a sentencing alternative for chemically dependent juvenile offenders. The first task in this evaluation is to provide a comprehensive literature review which will provide the scientific basis for the treatment interventions chosen for use in the CDDA program. As part of the literature review, ADAI will outline the elements of effective chemical dependency treatment programs for adolescents as well as develop standards for measuring the effectiveness of these treatment programs. The standards will include outcome measures for treated adolescents and program specific variables such as level of program implementation. These standards will provide DSHS with criteria to prioritize funding for inpatient and outpatient treatment provided under the CDDA program. ADAI will then design and perform a longitudinal evaluation utilizing these standards at 6, 12, and 18 months following client participation in the CDDA program. A process evaluation and cost-benefit analysis will also be conducted. The study will document efficacy of existing CDDA programs and suggest recommendations for program improvements.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
Project completed
AccessNo
64
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DSHS
JRA
PIEmail
mruthfrd@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_rutherford
BriefDescrip
This project will evaluate the state's new Chemical Dependency Disposition Alternative (CDDA) program, a sentencing alternative for chemically dependent juvenile offenders.

Title
Road Rage
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington Traffic Safety Commission
Abstract
Funded by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, this project will study the timely issue of "Road Rage" or aggressive driving. Researchers will analyze the Aggressive Drivers Apprehension Team (ADAT) database of aggressive driving arrests and compare it with both state-wide and regional databases of the general driving population. This will allow them to compile a profile of aggressive drivers and to propose a set of interventions aimed at reducing aggressive driving. Such interventions could potentially be implemented by the State's court system or Department of Licensing.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStaff
Baxter, Brent L - Project Director
AccessNo
65
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
WTSC
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan
BriefDescrip
This project will study the timely issue of "road rage" or aggressive driving by analyzing data from the Aggressive Drivers Apprehension Team (ADAT) database of aggressive driving arrests and comparing it to state-wide and regional databases about the general driving population.

Title
Reducing HIV/STD Risk Behaviors: A Research Study for Men in Drug Abuse Treatment
ShortName
NIDA-CTN-0018
PIName
Donald A. Calsyn, PhD
PITitle
Chief, Outpatient Programs, Addiction Treatment Center, VA Puget Sound
Affiliated Faculty Research, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, UW
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
Drug treatment, itself, can have a powerful positive effect on HIV drug use risk behavior, especially needle use behaviors. Research suggests that men and women are less likely to engage in risky sex behavior with an intense HIV risk reduction intensity, peer group discussion, and the use of separate sex sessions. This study evaluates a five-session HIV/AIDS group therapy designed specifically for heterosexual men. This therapy is compared to standard HIV/AIDS education, which generally consists of a single session of HIV education. The researchers hypothesize that men in the gender-specific therapy group will report less risky sexual behavior than men in standard therapy. They are also expected to have a more positive attitude about condoms, be more likely to have condoms, be more likely to have taken condoms from clinic supplies, report less drug use in combination with sex, and hold a more egalitarian attitude toward women.
The Washington Node is the Lead Node on this protocol. Also participating are the California/Arizona, Delaware Valley, Long Island, New England, North Carolina, Ohio Valley, Pacific Region, South Carolina, and Southwest nodes.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
AccessNo
71
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
Washington Node home page: <a href="http://depts.washington.edu/adai/ctn-wa">http://depts.washington.edu/adai/ctn-wa</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
dcalsyn@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_calsyn
BriefDescrip
This study evaluates a five-session HIV/AIDS group therapy designed specifically for heterosexual men.

Title
Alcohol and HIV/AIDS Risk-Taking
PIName
William H. George, PhD
PITitle
Associate Professor
PIDept
Psychology
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R01AA013565
Abstract
Alcohol has emerged as a critical cofactor in HIV infection. Yet we still lack an understanding of how in-the-moment forces -- such as acute intoxication -- affect a person's decision to engage in risky behaviors. Our long-term goal is to illuminate the role played by intoxication in decision-making related to infectious diseases. Perhaps there exist heretofore-uninvestigated biphasic effects that would clarify paradoxical evidence of alcohol-induced suppression and associated outcomes. Such consideration may expand our understanding of alcohol and risky outcomes. The specific aims are (1) to examine the linkages among alcohol and risky behavior; (2) to evaluate the viability of the alcohol myopia model for explaining postdrinking attitudes and behavior; (3) to investigate alcohol impairment of behavior control; and (4) to expand the currently scant fund of experimental data about women after drinking by evaluating for systematic gender differences in these relationships for intoxication and risky behavior. To address these aims, six controlled laboratory experiments are planned systematically manipulating alcohol (alcohol, none), BAC limb (ascending, descending), dosage (moderate, high), behavioral activation (maximize, none, suppress), and conflict (high, low). The sample will be elevated-risk, unmarried men and women attending urban university campuses and/or residing in urban census tracts. The overarching hypothesis is that alcohol impairs the capacity to inhibit behavior and that it directly and indirectly (through its impairment of inhibition) impairs the capacity to inhibit risk-taking. Alcohol should interact with limb such that ascending exceeds descending impact and should interact such that alcohol fosters riskier outcomes under high conflict. In concert with personality and other factors, the data may inform key knowledge gaps, advance theory, and foster refinement of existing prevention approaches and formulation of new ones.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
September 26, 2001
ProjEnd
August 31, 2006
ProjStaff
Jeanette Norris, PhD (ADAI Senior Research Scientist)
AccessNo
73
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
bgeorge@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The goal of this project is to illuminate the role played by intoxication in decision-making related to infectious diseases.

Title
The Healing of the Canoe
ShortName
Healing the Canoe
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities
GrantNo
R24 MD001764
Abstract
The overall goal of this collaboration is to work in partnership to plan, implement, and evaluate a community-based and culturally congruent intervention to reduce health disparities and promote health in the Suquamish Tribe, a federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native reservation community located in the Pacific Northwest. This three-year planning project will proceed in two phases. Phase 1 will take place in Year 1 and is devoted to partnership development, conducting community needs and resources assessment, identification of health issues of concern for the Suquamish community, and identifying, planning, and adapting a community based intervention to address the identified health issue(s). Phase 2 will take place in Years 2 and 3 and will be devoted to piloting and evaluating the intervention. A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methodology will be utilized, involving the community in each aspect of the planning and implementation of the intervention. In addition, a Suquamish Tribal member will serve as a Co-Investigator, and community members will serve as key personnel. Both outcome and process data will be collected to determine feasibility, applicability and to develop a model that other Community-Campus partnerships can utilize to work collaboratively to identify and reduce health disparities in ethnically, culturally, socioeconomically, and geographically diverse populations.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Descriptors
American Indian / Alaska Native (AI/AN)
Health disparities
Community-based research
Culturally appropriate treatment and prevention
Suquamish Tribe
ProjStart
28-Sep-2005
ProjEnd
28-Feb-2013
AwardAmt
$555,876
ProjStaff
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
Lisette Austin, PhD
Heather Lonczak, PhD
Notes
RFA-MD-07-003
AccessNo
74
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/canoe/">Canoe Project Home</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7645523&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCMHD
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan
BriefDescrip
The "Healing of the Canoe" is a collaborative project between the Suquamish Tribe, a reservation community in the Pacific Northwest, and the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, University of Washington. The project will plan, implement, and evaluate a community-based and culturally-based intervention aimed at connecting Native American youth to their cutlural heritage, as a means to reduce substance abuse and other health problems.
Logo
http://lib.adai.washington.edu/images/HOC_logo_sm2.jpg
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/healingcanoe

Title
Toxicology Lab Data Epidemiology
ShortName
Tox Lab Data
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Patrol
Abstract
This project is funded by the Washington State Patrol's Toxicology Laboratory to investigate and analyze the epidemiology of street and prescription drug use in counties throughout Washington. Specific attention will be given to reviewing the cause and manner of deaths involving methamphetamine, and the significance of methamphetamine use in impaired driving populations. Multiple data sources will be utilized including mortality, DUI, and law enforcement drug seizure data. Analysis will examine temporal and geographic trends in drug use and the impacts of drug use.
Categories
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
ProjStart
January 18, 2006
ProjEnd
December 31, 2007
ProjStaff
Sara Miller, MPH
AccessNo
75
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
WSP
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
BriefDescrip
This project will review the cause and manner of deaths involving methamphetamine in Washington State, and the significance of methamphetamine use in impaired driving populations.

Title
Substance Use and HIV Risk
ShortName
Substance Use & Risk
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
K05 AA015050
Abstract
Goals for the five-year period include a) investigating the relationship of substance use to HIV risk behavior from a methodological perspective, incorporating person-level, event- level, and within-person analyses; b) studying the association of alcohol and other drug use to risk behavior in a national sample of adolescents; and d) developing new projects to expand research in both these areas. The career plan also includes continued collaboration with local and international colleagues in scientific activities, and expansion of mentoring and science education.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
01-May-2005
ProjEnd
30-Apr-2010
AwardAmt
$562,737
Notes
PA-00-021
AccessNo
76
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7615116&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_leigh
BriefDescrip
This project continues Dr. Leigh's ongoing program of research on substance use and HIV risk behavior, with a Senior Scientist (K05) award from NIAAA.

Title
Daily Self-Reports of Injection Drug Use and Risk
ShortName
Injection Use Reports (SPIN Study)
PIName
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
R21 DA021092
Abstract
Injection drug users (IDUs) are at high risk for blood-borne infections, including HIV, hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C (HCV), due to the sharing of drug injection equipment and other blood exposures. Measurement issues in this domain are crucial but are difficult to address adequately given the limitations of retrospective self-reports. Daily measurements of behavior, although still imperfect, may be more accurate than retrospective accounts.
<p>The purpose of this R21 project is to conduct a pilot study in which injection drug users report daily on their drug use and injection risk behavior, using an innovative technique of computerized telephone interviewing (Interactive Voice Response, or IVR). The aims of the project include assessing the feasibility of collecting daily reports from this difficult population, comparing daily reports with retrospective measures of drug use and risk, assessing the completeness of retrospective reports of drug injection partners, describing patterns of injection drug use and risk over time within individuals, and describing episode- and day-level contemporaneous correlates and prospective predictors of individuals’ injection drug use and risk. By comparing daily reports to retrospective measures, we can examine some of the ways in which retrospective reports may or may not capture injection drug use and risk behaviors. If we demonstrate that the use of daily IVR is feasible with this population, future studies can make use of IVR as a cost-effective means of measuring injection drug use and risk in IDUs.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
April 1, 2006
ProjEnd
March 31, 2008
AwardAmt
$317,458
ProjStaff
Devon Brewer, PhD
AccessNo
77
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7230032&icde=5638122">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
leigh@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_leigh
BriefDescrip
The purpose of this R21 project is to conduct a pilot study in which injection drug users report daily on their drug use and injection risk behavior, using an innovative technique of computerized telephone interviewing (Interactive Voice Response, or IVR).

Title
Substance Use Screening & Assessment Instruments Database
ShortName
EBI (Evidence Based Instruments)
PIName
Nancy Sutherland, MLS
PITitle
Associate Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Abstract
The Substance Use Screening & Assessment Instruments web site and database is intended to help clinicians and researchers find instruments used for screening and assessment of substance use and substance use disorders. The database currently has records about more than 350 instruments and is updated regularly.
<p>
This web site features a searchable database of questionnaires and measures used in clinical practice and research on substance abuse. It includes instruments with proven clinical utility and research validity, as well as newer instruments that have not yet been thoroughly evaluated but may be of interest to someone doing research on AOD assessment. Records cite the name, acronym, and developer(s) of the measures as well as a brief description. They are indexed by population group, purpose of instrument (e.g. diagnostic, treatment planning) and administration format (e.g. self- or clinician-administered), among other criteria. Records include information about scoring and administration, psychometrics, source, and related references. Scales that are in the public domain can be downloaded in PDF format or are linked to a web site. For instruments that are proprietary, information about their availability and pricing is given if known. Other features of the web site include a brief glossary of terms about assessment, an annotated list of resources for finding instruments (including sources not listed here), and canned searches of PubMed and the ADAI Library catalog for literature about the specific instruments or about AOD assessment in general.
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStaff
Meg Brunner, MLIS
Pam Miles, MLS
AccessNo
78
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://lib.adai.washington.edu/instruments/">Substance Abuse Screening & Assessment Instrument Database</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DASA
PIEmail
nsutherland@adai.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The Substance Use Screening & Assessment Instruments database is a resource to help clinicians and researchers find instruments used for screening and assessment of substance use and substance use disorders.

Title
Modeling Individual Heterogeneity in the Alcohol Relapse Process
ShortName
Modeling Heterogeneity
PIName
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R03AA016322
Abstract
By analyzing data from Project MATCH, this study aims to delineate patterns in post-treatment drinking during the first year following alcohol treatment.
<p>
Approximately 17.6 million Americans meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, and 12.5 percent of individuals who meet criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence (2.2 million Americans) will receive treatment for an alcohol problem. Of those who receive treatment, the majority of individuals will have at least one drink in the first 12 months following treatment. This study aims to delineate patterns in post-treatment drinking during the first year following alcohol treatment. Data from Project MATCH, a multi-site investigation of alcohol treatment sponsored by the NIAAA, will be used to test the hypothesis that there is significant variability in the drinking behavior between individuals and within individuals across time. Secondary data analyses of the Project MATCH data will be conducted for three distinct purposes. The first goal of the proposed study will be to replicate previous research using latent growth mixture modeling to investigate common patterns and individual differences in trajectories of drinking after the initial post-treatment drink. The second goal is to describe the differences in drinking trajectories using a biopsychosocial model of relapse risk factors. The third goal is to quantify the complexity of the relapse process by extending the latent growth mixture models to analyze the behavior of individuals who transition in-and-out of abstinence. The goal of these analyses is to understand why and when individuals experience major shifts in drinking over time. The major aim of the proposed research is to provide an empirically-driven model of relapse that incorporates the individual variability and abrupt, discontinuous nature of the relapse process, as illustrated in theoretical and qualitative reports. The ultimate goal of this inquiry is to provide clinicians and their clients with a heightened awareness of risk factors that may predispose an individual to heavy drinking and those factors that increases the probability of transitioning from light-to-heavy drinking following treatment.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
15-Aug-2006
ProjEnd
31-Jul-2008
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist)
Results
Witkiewitz KA, Hartzler B, Donovan DM. Matching motivation enhancement treatment to client motivation: Re-examining the Project MATCH motivation matching hypothesis. Addiction 2010 105(8):1403-1413; comment on pp. 1414-15. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3157315/">PMC3157315</a>
Notes
Growth mixture modeling (GMM)
AccessNo
79
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
kate19@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_witkiewitz
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/modelingheterogeneity

Title
Drinking Trajectories after Behavior Intervention: Assessing Mechanisms of Change
ShortName
Drinking Trajectories
PIName
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
R21 AA017137
Abstract
The proposed research will use existing data from the COMBINE study to evaluate the mechanisms of behavior change following a combined behavioral intervention (CBI) for alcohol dependence. COMBINE was a multisite clinical trial conducted to evaluate the efficacy of two medications for alcohol dependence (naltrexone and acamprosate) when used in conjunction with one of two behavioral interventions (CBI and medical management). This project will focus specifically on individuals who were randomly assigned to the CBI conditions (n=776). Assessments of psychological, drinking, and behavioral outcomes were conducted at 8, 16, 26, 52, and 68 weeks. Using a multi-method analysis framework, the relationship between background variables, risk and protective factors, and treatment process measures, will be examined with respect to drinking outcomes (including quantity, frequency, and drinking-related consequences). In addition, this study will incorporate a dynamical systems approach to examining the impact of two specific CBI modules, Mood Management and Coping with Craving and Urges, which are intended to change mood and craving, respectively. It is well-documented that a lack of effective coping responses increases relapse risk; and craving, mood, and perceived stress have been identified as important mediators in the return to heavy drinking following treatment. However, the relationship between these variables in the relapse process has not been clearly established. Focusing on the process of relapse, this project will examine trajectories of drinking behavior and related consequences during treatment and in the first year following treatment for alcohol dependence. The first goal of the project is to model the discontinuous and complex drinking behavior patterns following treatment. The second goal is to quantify the relationship between processes of change during treatment, specific treatment modules intended to impact change mechanisms, and post-treatment drinking patterns.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
15-Sep-2007
ProjEnd
29-Sep-2010
AwardAmt
$155,710
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist)
Results
Witkiewitz KA, Donovan DM, Hartzler B. Drink refusal training as part of a combined behavioral intervention: Effectiveness and mechanisms of change. J Consult Clin Psychol 2012;80(3):440-449. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349797/">Full text PMC3349797</a>
Witkiewitz KA, Villarroel NA, Hartzler B, Donovan DM. Drinking outcomes following drink refusal skills training: Differential effects for African-American and Non-Hispanic White clients. Psychol Addict Behav 2011;25(1):162-7. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21443311">PubMed abstract</a>
Hartzler B, Witkiewitz KA, Villarroel NA, Donovan DM. Self-efficacy change as a mediator of associations between therapeutic bond and one-year outcomes in treatments for alcohol dependence. Psychol Addict Behav 2011;25(2):269-278. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3236109/">Full text PMC3236109>/a>
Notes
RFA-AA-07-005
AccessNo
80
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7496607&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
kate19@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_witkiewitz
BriefDescrip
This project uses existing data from the COMBINE study to evaluate mechanisms of behavior change following a combined behavioral intervention (CBI) for alcohol dependence.

Title
Native Healing and Wellness Conference
ShortName
Tribal Conference
PIName
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities
GrantNo
R13MD002247
Abstract
This conference grant supported the planning and implementation of two one-and-a-half day conferences that brought together representatives from the 29 federally recognized tribes, other American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) agencies, and urban AIAN communities in Washington State. The first conference ("Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in May 2008 at the Suquamish-owned Kiana Lodge in Paulsbo, WA. The second meeting ("Native Healing and Wellness Conference") was held in September 200 at the Great Wolf Lodge, Centralia, WA.
<p>

<b>Background:</b> According to the 2000 census, there are approximately 93,000 American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) people in the state of Washington (1.6% of the total population). AIAN individuals and communities are distributed across the state with communities ranging from small, rural groups to urban, inter-Tribal ones. Due to complex relationships between Tribes and local, state, and federal agencies, health care may be provided either by the Tribe, local service providers, the state, and Indian Health Service facility, a regional Native Health Board, or by some combination of the above. Because of this, there is very little empirical data about health disparities as they are experienced by AIAN communities, especially in regards to mental health and substance abuse services. Little is also known about the many community-developed programs that often incorporate Tribal values, practices, and beliefs, and have anecdotal evidence of effectiveness. Finally, a lack of funding and overburdened resources result in decreased access to appropriate training for many mental health and substance abuse service providers working with Tribal communities.

<p>
The primary aims of these conferences are to: 1) identify substance abuse and mental health disparity issues of greatest concern to urban, rural, and reservation Tribal communities; 2) identify best practices that have been developed in Tribal communities to address such issues but that may be lacking strong empirical evidence; 3) educate Tribal communities and researchers by providing expert speakers who can address health issues of concern to Tribal communities; 4) provide specific clinical skills for working with AIAN communities regarding mental health and substance abuse; and 5) provide an opportunity for Tribal organizations to connect and collaborate with researchers and network with other Tribal communities.

A conference report was published after the first conference, documenting these issues and practices and setting the agenda for future conferences.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Training / Information
ProjStart
July 12, 2007
ProjEnd
March 31, 2011
ProjStaff
Lisette Austin, MA (Conference & Research Coodinator)
AccessNo
82
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/tribalconference/">Tribal Healing and Wellness Conference website, with <b>summary report</b></a> and <a href="http://www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/oip/TribalHealingWellness2008reportppt.pdf">slides about the conference</a>.
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/training/pdf/tribalconference2009.pdf">Native Healing and Wellness Conference program</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_history.cfm?aid=7674068&icde=6930931">NIH RePORTer record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCMHD
PIEmail
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Title
National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network - Pacific Northwest Node
ShortName
Pacific Northwest Node
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
U10DA013714
Abstract
Drug dependence continues to be a persistent problem for which new treatments, both behavioral and pharmacological, are continually being developed. There is a great need to develop mechanisms by which such treatments, once shown to be efficacious, can be put into widespread clinical practice in community-based treatment programs where the largest number of drug abusers are seen. A number of barriers between researchers and clinicians, however, have made such a transition difficult, if at all possible. The recent Institute of Medicine report has challenged us to work on "bridging the gap," to address the barriers to facilitate a more functional working relationship between treatment providers and clinical researchers, who share a common goal of wanting to improve substance abuse treatment and its outcomes. NIDA has developed an action agenda to stimulate treatment providers and researchers to consider ways, from each of their perspectives, to narrow or bridge the "gap." NIDA's action agenda is the development of the National Clinical Trials Network (CTN), in which researchers at Regional Research and Training Centers work in partnership with Community-based Treatment Programs both to develop areas of mutual interest for future clinical research and to test promising therapies in community settings.
<p>
In January 2001, the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute received a five-year grant from NIDA to join the CTN as the Pacific Northwest Node, one of seventeen state and regional nodes throughout the country. ADAI and UW researchers from many departments comprise the node's Regional Research and Training Center which has as its primary focus the development, implementation, and evaluation of behavioral and pharmacological therapies for drug abuse, targeted at treatment as delivered in community settings. As part of the larger Clinical Trials Network, the Pacific Northwest Node conducts behavioral and pharmacological research studies as a means of informing policy, therapy development, and the evaluation process, with a goal of contributing meaningfully to improved effectiveness of new and promising therapies. Investigators at the UW have a long history of working with community programs in research and program evaluation, collaborating on multi-site clinical trials, developing and evaluating both pharmacotherapy and behavioral therapy, conducting services research, and translating and disseminating results into information useful for clinicians and policy makers.
<p>
<b>Expansion:</b>

In 2007, the PN Node was awarded an additional three years of funding, and expanded to include a treatment center in Sitka, Alaska, the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, as well as the Addiction Treatment Center at the VA Puget Sound and American Lake hospitals in Washington. A subsequent renewal (continuing our funding through August 2014), we expanded our collaborative network through a partnership with Dr. John Roll, Associated Dean for Research and Professor in the School of Nursing at Washington State University, Spokane. Drs. Donovan and Roll now serve as Multiple PIs for the Pacific Northwest Node. This expansion leverages the resources of ADAI and the existing PNW Node Regional Research and Training Center at UW with those of the Program of Excellence in Rural Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment (RMHSAT) and the Program of Excellence in the Addiction, both of which are directed by Dr. Roll at WSU. This partnership also provides the opportunity to expand the scope of the Node to include increased attention to the issues of substance abuse in rural settings.
<p>
<b>Community-Based Treatment Programs:</b> We currently have 15 collaborating community-based treatment and health care programs affiliated with the PNW Node <a href="http://adai.washington.edu/ctn/chart.htm">http://adai.washington.edu/ctn/chart.htm</a>.
<p>
The Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute also serves as the National CTN Dissemination Library for the Clinical Trials Network (<a href="(http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org">http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/</a>). It is a digital repository of resources created by and about NIDA's National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). It provides CTN members and the public with a single point of access to research findings and other materials that are approved for dissemination throughout the CTN and to the larger community of providers, researchers and policy-makers. The CTN Library is described more fully later in this report in the section entitled Dissemination of Research Findings.

<p>
The Pacific NW Node has participated in 20 CTN protocols or ancillary studies since joining the CTN in 2001, collaborating with community treatment programs in Washington and other CTN Nodes. For more information about the Washington Node, including a list of the staff and active protocols, visit the <a href="http://adai.washington.edu/ctn/">CTN PN Node website</a>.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
Descriptors
drug abuse therapy
human therapy evaluation
interdisciplinary collaboration
clinical trial
combination therapy
cooperative study
drug abuse chemotherapy
health care policy
health care service availability
clinical research
human subject
ProjStart
January 10, 2001
ProjEnd
May 31, 2020
AwardAmt
2001-2007 (11 mil)
2007-2010 (5.56 mil)
ProjStaff
<b>Co-Principal Investigator: John Roll, PhD</b>. Associate Dean for Research and Professor, School of Nursing, Washington State University.
Elizabeth Wells, PhD
T. Ronald Jackson, MSW
Andrew J. Saxon, MD
John Baer, PhD
Donald A. Calsyn, PhD (deceased)
Sharon Garrett, MPH, MA
Brenda Stuvek
Mary Hatch-Maillette, PhD
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
AccessNo
83
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_history.cfm?aid=7984266&icde=6851402">NIH RePORTER record</a>
<a href="http://adai.washington.edu/ctn/index.htm">PNW Node website</a>
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org">CTN Dissemination Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan
BriefDescrip
A multisite network of regional research and training centers working in conjunction with community-based treatment programs to implement and evaluate behavioral and pharmacological interventions with demonstrated efficacy in community-based programs.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/pnnode

Title
Starting Treatment with Agonist Replacement Therapies
ShortName
START
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
University of California, Los Angeles
Abstract
START is a randomized, open-label, multi-center phase IV study designed to compare the changes in liver enzymes related to treatment with Buprenorphine/Naloxone (BUP/NX) to the changes in liver enzymes related to treatment with methadone in an outpatient setting. Secondary objectives will be to attempt to identify risk factors at baseline and during treatment that could contribute to interactions with BUP/NX or methadone causing liver dysfunction, and to assess abstinence from illicit drugs or alcohol during the active study period.
<p>
This CTN "platform" study was requested by the FDA and uses the collaboration of two NIDA divisions -- the Center for Clinical Trials Network (CCTN) and the Division of Pharmacotherapies & Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
09/01/2005
ProjEnd
08/31/2007
ProjStaff
Andrew J. Saxon, MD
AccessNo
87
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0027.htm">Protocxol page in the CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
UCLA
BriefDescrip
START (CTN 0027) is a randomized, open-label, multi-center, Phase 4 study assessed the effects of buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NX) and methadone on liver function in participants entering opioid agonist treatment.

Title
Factors Related to Juvenile Drug Court Completion
ShortName
Juvenile Drug Court (JUVI)
PIName
Megan J. Rutherford, PhD
FundingAgency
National Institutes of Health
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
March 15, 2006
ProjEnd
February 28, 2008
AccessNo
92
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIH

Title
Computerized Assistance for Treatment Professionals in Assessment of Sexual Risk
ShortName
Sexual Risk Assessment
PIName
Donald A. Calsyn, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5R21DA022940-02
Abstract
The proposed work represents the first steps in the development of a larger program to change the context in which sexual risk assessment and sexual risk reduction interventions occur in substance abuse treatment agencies. Previous research in addiction treatment and primary care settings suggests that clients in substance abuse treatment engage in high risk sexual behaviors; that sexual risk behaviors show some decline simply with engagement in treatment; and that professionals can be trained to implement risk-reduction interventions. This is important in the context of reducing risks of HIV and STD transmission in this population. A multi-phase program is proposed with the goal of pilot testing a low-cost, brief HIV risk assessment and prevention intervention with adults in treatment. Phase 1: Develop an audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) based HIV risk assessment and feedback tool. A tool previously used in a multi-site, randomized clinical trial, the Sexual Behavior Inventory (SBI), will be modified for use as a brief assessment and feedback tool, Being Safe in Treatment (BEST). Modifications will include shortening the assessment and adding a client and a staff feedback report. The client report will identify behaviors that put them at risk for HIV and other STDs and will include suggestions for reducing risks. The staff report will include the same client report information plus suggested approaches for addressing sexual risk behaviors. Phase 2: Determine the acceptability of the BEST for use by both clients and counselors. The BEST assessment will be administered to 16 men and 16 women enrolled in substance abuse treatment. Both clients and treatment providers will be provided with the BEST feedback reports based on client responses to the assessment. Four focus groups will be conducted with clients completing BEST, and two focus groups will be conducted with staff who will review sample BEST feedback reports. Clients completing the BEST will answer a brief survey regarding the ease of completing the assessment tool. Based on the feedback, the BEST will then be modified to improve question clarity, delete any sections deemed irrelevant, or add sections which respondents felt were lacking. The above process will be repeated with 16 additional men and 16 women in treatment and their counselors in the effort to finalize the tool. Phase 3: Conduct a pilot study on the effectiveness of the BEST to increase client HIV knowledge, motivation for sexual risk reduction, condom use skills, and counselor-client communication about HIV risk behaviors. The BEST assessment will be administered to 200 clients newly admitted to treatment. The assessment will be repeated after three months. Clients will be randomized to one of 4 conditions in a 2 (client feedback) by 2 (counselor feedback) design. We hypothesize that the combination of BEST assessment with feedback to both clients and counselors will be more effective at increasing: HIV/AIDS knowledge, motivation to reduce sexual risk, condom use skills, and communication about sexual issues than assessment only or assessment with feedback to only the client or the counselor.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
28-Sep-2007
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2010
AwardAmt
$145,630
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist)
Results
Hartzler B, Beadnell, B, Calsyn DA. Use of sexual risk assessment and feedback at intake to promote counselor awareness of subsequent client risk behavior during early treatment. Subst Use Misuse 2014 (in press) doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10826084.2014.891622">10.3109/10826084.2014.891622</a>
Notes
PA-06-181
AccessNo
93
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7501312&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
dcalsyn@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_calsyn
BriefDescrip
This NIDA-funded study is designing and evaluating a computer-based assessment tool for sexual risk assessment for community-based treatment providers.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/sexriskassess

Title
Prescription Opioid Misuse in a Large HMO
ShortName
Opioid Misuse in WA
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
R21 DA018695
Abstract
Licit and illicit use of prescription opioids, as well as associated morbidity and mortality, have increased significantly in the past six years in Washington State and nationally. Prescription opioid misuse is a constellation of behaviors characterized by unstable or chaotic patterns of medication use and aberrant patterns of medical care seeking. The biopsychosocial model will be used to examine the transition from opioid use to opioid misuse in the context of chronic pain treatment with opioids from the perspectives of health systems and clinicians.

The specific aims of this proposal are to:
1. Determine the prevalence of prescription opioid misuse, abuse and dependence among those prescribed chronic opioids for non-malignant pain, and to determine the correlation between opioid misuse and the commonly used diagnostic categories of opioid abuse and dependence.
2. Model the utility of automated medical record data in differentiating between opioid misusers and non-misusers and determine the screening properties of the derived model (e.g. sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratio).
3. Assess the utility of the automated data model obtained in Aim #2, enhanced with brief interview items related to pain severity, substance abuse, and mental health symptoms to identify potential opioid misusers.

To meet these aims, we propose a retrospective cohort study of moderate to long-term opioid users in a large HMO in Washington State. Eligible subjects include all HMO enrollees, including those receiving opioids from primary and specialty care physicians. This large (n=1,000) and diverse sample will allow for greater generalizability of the findings than most of the preliminary studies to date, which were often conducted in pain clinics or the V.A. with its primarily male clientele. Data on medication use, medical conditions, and other risk factors for misuse will be obtained from automated data files. A structured phone interview will be used to obtain the predictor variables for Aim 3, the outcome variables related to opioid misuse, and DSM IV diagnoses of opioid abuse and dependence. Models to identify predictors of opioid misuse will be developed with half of the sample and validated with the other half. De-identified data on non-respondents will be utilized to adjust analyses for any non-response bias.
Categories
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
ProjStart
June 10, 2006
ProjEnd
May 31, 2008
ProjStaff
Don Calsyn, PhD (Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Research Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute; Dr. Calsyn was the original PI of this grant)
AccessNo
94
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_history.cfm?aid=7268099&icde=6806481">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Title
Long-term Opioid Management of Chronic Pain: Trends and Risks
PIName
Michael Von Korff, ScD
PITitle
Senior Scientific Investigator
PIDept
Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
Health services research and epidemiologic methods will be used to understand who receives long-term opioid therapy and to assess associated risks including onset of opioid abuse and mortality. This research will be conducted in two large, non-profit health plans serving over 1% of the U.S. population. Research goals - Our goals are to advance knowledge concerning determinants and risks of long-term opioid therapy among chronic pain patients. Aim 1-Examine trends: We will describe trends in use of long-term opioid therapy in the participating health plans from 1995-2006 and determine how patient characteristics indicating clinical complexity and prior substance abuse are related to trends in long-term opioid use. Aim 2-Assess risks of opioid abuse: We will assess risk factors for opioid abuse among persons receiving long-term opioid therapy. Aim 3-Assess mortality and other adverse event risks: We will assess whether mortality and other adverse event risks are increased by long-term opioid therapy. We will extend these analyses by studying the effects of long-term opioid therapy on other adverse events including: all-cause and opioid-related hospitalization; opioid overdose; and onset of recognized mood disorder.
<p>This project is based at the Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative. ADAI has a subcontract for the work of Dr. Banta-Green; his primary role will be in the development, implementation and analysis of the interview study used to address Aim 2, risk factors for opioid abuse.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
ProjStart
Sept 28, 2006
ProjEnd
April 30, 2010
ProjStaff
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MSW, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist)
AccessNo
97
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7617922&icde=5806767">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
vonkorff.m@ghc.org
BriefDescrip
Health services research and epidemiologic methods will be used to understand who receives long-term opioid therapy and to assess associated risks including onset of opioid abuse and mortality. Dr. Banta-Green’s primary role will be in the development, implementation and analysis of the interview study used to address risk factors for opioid abuse.

Title
Quantitative Drug Surveillance System Development
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
1R21DA024800-01
Abstract
Drug abuse continues to have major public health consequences. Yet, validated, quantitative drug abuse surveillance tools are limited. Several national drug abuse surveillance systems have ceased operating or been substantially curtailed in recent years. This proposal aims to address these limitations by developing the methodology and establishing the feasibility of a drug-surveillance system based on quantifying illicit drugs, other drug-use indicators including metabolites and synthesis precursors, and human biomarkers in raw influent entering municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) that process human waste. WWTPs have known catchment areas with specific geographic boundaries, population estimates, and volumetric flows that allow for the analysis of trends in community drug discharge over time and between locations.

<p>The primary substance of interest for this proposal is methamphetamine, which will be quantified along with several other drugs of abuse (illicit and pharmaceutical) along with selected metabolites and human population biomarkers. AIMS: 1) Develop and validate a sensitive and selective analytical method for quantifying the concentration of methamphetamine, other illicit and pharmaceutical drugs in 24 hr, flow-normalized composites of raw influent entering WWTPs; 2) Develop procedures for obtaining samples from a diverse set of WWTPs; 3) Determine the geographic and temporal (seasonal, day of week) variability of drug excretion on a per capita and community basis in order to describe use patterns and to develop sampling frames with optimal efficiency; and 4) Determine the correlation between measured drug discharge estimates and other drug use indicator data. To meet these aims, we propose to collect 24 hr, flow-normalized samples of raw influent from 20 WWTPs throughout Oregon and Washington for one year. A minimum of 52 samples will be obtained from each WWTP using a stratified, time-based sampling plan that will incorporate seasonal and interday variation. Methamphetamine and other drugs of abuse are readily detected and uniquely identifiable by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. WWTPs provide coverage to more than 100 cities and towns in Oregon and Washington. Current drug surveillance data indicate substantial geographic heterogeneity in rates of drug use throughout the Pacific Northwest. Our proposal has the support of diverse, local stakeholders including public health, drug treatment, law enforcement, and WWTP managers.

<p>The findings of this R21 can be used 1) to provide research tools to examine a range of questions regarding differences in drug use by linking WWTP influent data to other geocoded data, 2) to provide local planners with validated, quantitative findings that can be used to inform allocation decisions for prevention and intervention efforts and for outcome evaluations, 3) by environmental chemists to refine analytical methods for detecting licit and illicit drugs, 4) to evaluate other geographic areas, 5) for emergent outbreak investigations, and 6) to create baseline data for future longitudinal and geographic analyses. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This proposal directly addresses public health both in terms of its content and methods. Drug abuse has substantial public health consequences including morbidity and mortality due to the use and abuse of both licit and illicit substances. Methodologically this proposal develops a low-cost method for monitoring community level drug abuse trends as well as a means to conduct outbreak investigations.
Categories
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
ProjStart
April 1, 2008
ProjEnd
March 31, 2010
AwardAmt
$177,189 (FY09), $220,635 (FY08)
ProjStaff
Jennifer A. Field, PhD, Oregon State University
Notes
PA-06-343 ("pee study")
AccessNo
98
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7576771&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
BriefDescrip
This proposal aims to develop the methodology and establish the feasibility of a drug-surveillance system based on quantifying illict drugs, other drug-use indicators including metabolites and synthesis precursors, and human biomarkers in raw influent entering municipal wastewater treatment plants that process human waste.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/quantitativedrugsurv

Title
Alcohol Effects on Cognitive and Affective Mediation of Women's Decision-Making (Project WIN)
ShortName
Project WIN
PIName
Jeanette Norris, PhD
PITitle
Senior Scientist, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
2R01AA014512-06A1
Abstract
Alcohol consumption increases risk-related behavior, and decision-making is cognitively and emotionally complex when a person is intoxicated. Understanding in-the-moment processes affecting women’s decisions while intoxicated is critical to informing prevention efforts.
<p>
This study will examine relationships among alcohol consumption, a partner’s coercion, and women’s risk-related decisions. It will draw on four theoretical lines: 1) the Cognitive Mediation Model (Norris et al., 2004), which examines the extent to which cognitive appraisals mediate the influence of background and situational factors on emotional and risk-related decisions ; 2) Alcohol Myopia Theory (Taylor & Leonard, 1983), which explicates the influence of alcohol-related cognitive impairment on behavior; 3) the Appraisal-Disruption Model (Sayette, 1993), which addresses alcohol’s cognitive impairment effects on emotional responding; and 4) Alcohol Expectancy Theory (Goldman, 1999; MacAndrew & Edgerton, 1969), which describes how alcohol influences behavior through cultural and individual expectations about alcohol’s effects.
<p>
The study will include a laboratory-based alcohol administration experiment to establish causal connections between manipulated situational factors, including alcohol consumption, and cognitive appraisals, emotional responses, and in-the-moment risk-related decisions. It will also employ a longitudinal survey to examine how in-the-moment decisions translate to actual situations. Structural equation modeling will be used to examine background and situational factors, as well as situationbased cognitive and emotional mediators, as predictors of in-the-moment decisions. Background and situational models will be examined using longitudinal data analytic techniques, including survival analysis, latent transition analysis, and growth curve modeling.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
30-Sep-2009
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2014
AwardAmt
$568,199
ProjStaff
Devon Abdallah, PhD (Project Manager); Anita Rocha (Data Manager); Joy Chan; Tina M. Zawacki, PhD (Co-Principal Investigator)
Notes
PA-07-070
AccessNo
100
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7729156&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
norris@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_norris
BriefDescrip
Alcohol consumption puts women at risk for risky sexual decisions and sexual coercion. The proposed project will examine this major public health concern by studying the influence of alcohol on women's sexual decision making in coercive and consensual situations.

Title
Native Pathways to Sobriety: Pacific Northwest Oral Life Histories
PIName
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
1R01DA029002-01
Abstract
Like other NARCH components, this project will be conducted according to the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), with the consensus and collaboration of tribal communities and tribal partners. The NARCH Initiative supports partnerships throught the nation, between Tribes and Tribally-based organizations and institutions to develop opportunities for conducting research, research training, and faculty development to meet the needs of tribal communities.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
30-Sep-2009
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2013
AwardAmt
$155,589
ProjStaff
Lisette Austin
AccessNo
101
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7864466&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas
BriefDescrip
This project will explore the role of storytelling in the resiliencies that support sobriety, in partnership with Northwest Washington Indian Health Board and its member tribes. The project is a component of the Native American Research Center for Health (NARCH) at the Northwest Indian College Center for Health (NWIC).
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/nativepathways

Title
Tailoring "Real Men Are Safe" for African American and Hispanic Men
ShortName
T-REMAS
PIName
Donald A. Calsyn, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5RC1DA028245-02
Abstract
Prior research has demonstrated that the <b>Real Men Are Safe (REMAS)</b> HIV prevention intervention has been effective in helping men in substance abuse treatment lessen their sexual risk behavior. However, the intervention appeared to be more effective with whites as compared to African Americans and possibly Hispanics. The goal of this research is to develop a version of REMAS culturally tailored to be appropriate with African American and Hispanic men.

<p>The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that Blacks and Hispanics are overrepresented among men with HIV infection compared to Whites. The Clinical Trial Network (CTN) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recently completed a randomized clinical trial evaluating the utility of the REMAS HIV prevention intervention targeting men in substance abuse treatment. Men assigned to the REMAS groups engaged in fewer unprotected vaginal and anal intercourse occasions during the 90 days prior to the 3- and 6-month post-intervention follow-ups than men assigned to a standard HIV Education group. Post hoc analyses suggest Whites benefited more from the intervention than African Americans, and possibly Hispanics. The challenge proposed in this application is to revise the REMAS intervention, shown to be effective in the multisite CTN trial, to be more culturally relevant to African American and Hispanic participants. A two phase study is proposed for revising the REMAS intervention. In Phase 1 we will conduct formative research by convening a panel of academic and community based experts knowledgeable in HIV prevention in African American and Hispanic communities. Utilizing the Delphi process panel members will review the REMAS materials and make suggestions for revisions. The panel will be asked to help develop a revised version of the REMAS intervention which would be culturally viable for a mixed group of whites, African Americans and Hispanics. In phase 2 the revised REMAS version would be pilot tested for feasibility and acceptability in four community treatment programs within the NIDA CTN which have high percentages of either African American and/or Hispanic clientele.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
30-Sep-2009
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2011
AwardAmt
$504,645
ProjStaff
Mary Hatch-Maillette and Lynette Wright
Notes
RFA-OD-09-003
AccessNo
102
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0018.htm">Original REMAS protocol in CTN Library</a>
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/display/397.htm">"Real Men Are Safe" (REMAS) Manual</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_history.cfm?aid=7818542&icde=0">NIH RePORTer record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
dcalsyn@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_calsyn
BriefDescrip
Prior research has demonstrated that the Real Men Are Safe (REMAS) HIV prevention intervention has been effective in helping men in substance abuse treatment lessen their sexual risk behavior. However, the intervention appeared to be more effective with whites as compared to African Americans and possibly Hispanics. The goal of this research is to develop a version of REMAS culturally tailored to be appropriate with African American and Hispanic men.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/tremas

Title
Computer Adapted Standardized Patient for MI Skills Assessment - Phase I
ShortName
MI Skills Assessment / CASPI
PIName
John S. Baer, PhD
PITitle
Research Professor, Psychology
Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5R42DA020284-03
Abstract
There is a great need to facilitate dissemination of empirically based methods in addiction treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported therapeutic approach developed by Miller and Rollnick (1991, 2002). Although there is high demand for MI training, there is a lack of low-cost, reliable, and ecologically valid assessment methods for evaluating training needs and outcomes (Baer et al., 2004).
<p>In this study, investigators conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionalspropose to develop and validate a novel method of assessing clinician skill with MI by creating a Computer-Adapted Standardized Patients Instrument (CASPI) with the potential to be used in any setting with a personal computer. The product would provide a widely accessible and cost- efficient alternative to existing methods of clinician MI skill assessment. If successful, the CASPI methodology could be developed for many empirically derived treatments. Methods to accurately assess clinician skills at modest costs should greatly facilitate dissemination of research-based interventions. In Phase I, we developed a prototype of the CASPI and conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionals. Results showed that CASPI was well-received overall by providers, and has excellent internal reliability and highly encouraging preliminary concurrent validity with other established measures.
<p>This project received continued funding for Phase II.

<p>ADAI is a sub-contractor for this project for Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
01-Sep-2005
ProjEnd
30-Apr-2010
AwardAmt
$403,114 (FY09)
ProjStaff
Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe, MSW
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
Susan A. Stoner, PhD
Results
Baer JS, Carpenter K, Beadnell B, Stoner S, Ingalsbe M, Hartzler B, Rosengren DR, Drager Z. Computer Assessment of Simulated Patient Interviews (CASPI): Psychometric properties of a web-based system for the assessment of motivational interviewing skills. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2012;73(1):154-164. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3237707/">Full text PMC3237707</a>
Notes
PA-07-281
AccessNo
103
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=6992852&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
jsbaer@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
Low cost methods for the assessment of clinician skills are greatly needed to facilitate adoption of evidenced-based practice. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is empirically- based, effective, and a very popular therapeutic modality for substance abuse treatment. This project will develop a computer-based MI skills assessment instrument, which will be useful to MI trainers, training programs, treatment agencies, and researchers.

Title
Developing Research Capacity and Culturally Appropriate Research Methods: Community-Based Participatory Research Manual for Collaborative Research in Drug Abuse for American Indians and Alaska Natives
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities
Abstract
This study is in collaboration with the NIH National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and will be conducted in the Pacific Northwest Node of the NIDA CTN. The specific aim of this project is to develop a user-friendly manual or "field guide" on the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and Tribal participatory research (TPR) methods for academic researchers and Tribal communities to use when developing and implementing culturally relevant, truly collaborative research in the areas of substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, mental health, and other areas of health disparities in American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) populations.
<p>
The manual will be developed by collecting and incorporating information from several sources: (1) review of available literature; (2) focus groups or interviews with participants from Tribal communities; (3) focus groups or interviews with academic representatives; and (4) asking both community and academic partners to provide information about their experiences with research in AIAN communities (via email list).
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
2008?
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2010
ProjStaff
Cynthia Pearson, PhD (Project Director)
Notes
CTN-0034-Ot
AccessNo
104
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0034.htm">Protocol record in CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
NCMHD

Title
Methamphetamine: Where Does It Fit in the Bigger Picture of Drug Use of American Indian and Alaska Native Communities and Treatment Seekers?
ShortName
Methamphetamine & Other Drugs (MOD)
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
The first area of research emphasis in the NIDA Strategic Plan on Reducing Health Disparities (2004 Revision) is the epidemiology of drug abuse, health consequences and infectious diseases among minority populations. Because there are limited data available on methamphetamine use in American Indian communities, exploratory and pilot studies will be conducted as part of <b>CTN protocol CTN-0033</b> to develop collaborations with tribes and Native American treatment programs and to explore the epidemiology of methamphetamine use and co-occurring problems and disorders in diverse Native American communities.
<p>
Protocol CTN-0033-Ot-3 will conduct exploratory and preliminary studies to develop collaborative working relationships with tribes and tribal treatment programs in the Western Washington and Southeast Alaska to assess the epidemiology of co-occurring health disorders among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) seeking treatment for methamphetamine and other substance use in reservation-based and urban treatment centers.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
2008?
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2010
ProjStaff
Sandra Radin, Lisa Rey Thomas, Caleb Banta-Green
AccessNo
105
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0033ot3.htm">Protocol record in CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan
BriefDescrip
Methamphetamine use is a serious public health problem in American Indian communities, but not enough is known about the prevalence and severity of meth use in tribal communities. This project will develop collaborations with tribes and Native American treatment programs to explore the epidemiology of methamphetamine use and co-occurring problems and disorders in diverse Native American communities.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/methotherdrugs

Title
Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12): Evaluation of a Combined Individual-Group Intervention to Reduce Stimulant and Other Drug Use by Increasing 12-Step Involvement
ShortName
STAGE-12
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
This <b>NIDA CTN</b> protocol will evaluate the degree to which a combined group and individual intervention that also uses recovery mentors, "Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step" (STAGE-12), improves substance-related outcomes compared to treatment as usual (TAU) without STAGE-12 among stimulant (methamphetamine and/or cocaine) abusers. The primary objective of the protocol is to evaluate reduction in percent of days of stimulant use. Secondary objectives include evaluating reduction in percent days of use of other substances, the degree to which STAGE-12 increases involvement in 12-step activities and attendance at 12-step meetings, and the extent to which such 12-step involvement and meeting attendance influences substance use outcomes.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
2008
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2010
ProjStaff
Sharon Garrett 9Project Director), Betsy Wells, Lindsay Jenkins, Michelle Peavy
AccessNo
106
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0031.htm">Protocol record in CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_donovan
BriefDescrip
This NIDA CTN protocol will evaluate the degree to which a combined group and individual intervention that also uses recovery mentors (the NIDA STAGE-12 protocol), improves substance-related outcomes compared to treatment as usual, among methamphetamine and/or cocaine abusers.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/stage12ctn

Title
The Role of Alcohol Consumption in Classifications of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Clinical Study
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
Abstract
This CTN- and NIAAA-funded ancillary study is related to CTN-0031, "Stimulant Abusers Group to Engage in 12-Step (STAGE-12)."
<p>
This study will investigate the utility of adding a frequency measure of alcohol consumption to the DSM-V diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders, by analyzing the statistical performance of the alcohol consumption measure in conjunction with the other DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence criteria arrayed along a continuum of severity in clinical samples. The alcohol consumption measure will be the frequency of drinking 5+ drinks (men) or 4+ drinks (women) on an occasion. To accomplish this goal, the study will collect baseline data in clinical samples on the 5+/4+ alcohol consumption measure and DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence criteria.
<p>These data will be used in two stages of analysis. First, it will conduct IRT analyses to determine whether the diagnostic criteria in conjunction with the 5+/4+ consumption measure form patterns similar to those found in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Second, it will determine whether the alcohol severity indicator derived from the first stage of analysis predicts repeated measures of alcohol consumption collected at the follow-up points in the study.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
2008
ProjEnd
31-Aug-2010
AccessNo
107
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0031a2.htm">Protocol record in CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
NIAAA
BriefDescrip
This NIDA CTN ancillary study will investigate the utility of adding a frequency measure of alcohol consumption to the DSM-V diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/rolealcoholconsump

Title
Integrating Behavioral Interventions in Substance Abuse Treatment
PIName
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
NIDA K23 DA025678A2
Abstract
This project seeks to foster more effective provision of therapeutic services to substance-using treatment-seekers in our communities. This mentored early career development award will fund professional development activities and a sequence of three pilot research studies conducted over a 5-year period. The award’s overarching aim is development of a model of integrated clinical use of motivational interviewing and contingency management in opiate agonist treatment (OAT) settings. Professional development activities include advanced biostatistics coursework, supervised literature reviews with content experts, multi-regional site visits to community OAT clinics, attendance and provision of intervention training workshops for treatment providers, and facilitation of panel discussions among award contributors concerning model development. <p>Pilot research studies will: 1) examine policies, practices, and preferences of clinical directors and staff of national community OAT settings, 2) design and test a fidelity-monitoring instrument for contingency management implementation in OAT, and 3) evaluate impacts of a two-day contingency management training workshop on practitioner skillfulness and aggregate clinical outcomes at a large community OAT setting. This collective work informs an eventual RO1 grant application that will propose to test the utility of integrated vs. segregated training in MI and CM for OAT practitioners. <p>Award contributors are Dennis Donovan, Ph.D. (co-mentor), Don Calsyn, Ph.D. (co-mentor), John Roll, Ph.D. (CM content expert), Steve Lash, Ph.D. (CM content expert), David Rosengren, Ph.D. (MI content expert), Blair Beadnell, Ph.D. (biostatistician), and Ron Jackson, M.S.W. (OAT field expert).
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
April 2010
ProjEnd
March 2015
Results
Hartzler B, Jackson R, Jones BE, Beadnell B, Calsyn DA. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program. J Subst Abuse Treat 2014;46:429–438. doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2013.12.007">10.1016/j.jsat.2013.12.007</a>.
Hartzler B, Rabun C. Training addiction professionals in empirically supported treatments: perspectives from the treatment community. Subst Abuse 2014;35(1):30-6. doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2013.789816">10.1080/08897077.2013.789816</a>.
Hartzler B, Rabun C. Community treatment adoption of contingency management: A conceptual profile of U.S. clinics based on innovativeness of executive staff. Int J Drug Policy 2013;24(4):333-41. doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2012.07.009">j.drugpo.2012.07.009</a>
Hartzler B, Rabun C. Community opioid treatment perspectives on contingency management: Perceived feasibility, effectiveness, and transportability of social and financial incentives. J Subst Abuse Treat 2013;45(2):242-8. doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2013.01.014">10.1016/j.jsat.2013.01.014</a>
Hartzler B, Donovan DM, Tillotson C, Mongoue-Tchokote S, Doyle SR, McCarty D. A multilevel approach to predicting community addiction treatment attitudes about contingency management. J Subst Abuse Treat 2012;42(2):213–221. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3268877">Full text PMC3268877</a>
Hartzler B, Lash SJ, Roll JM. Contingency management in substance abuse treatment: A structured review of the evidence for its transportability. Drug Alcohol Depend 2012;122(1-2):1-10. <a href= "http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3307900">Full text PMC3307900</a>
AccessNo
108
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7890904&icde=5808046">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
PIEmail
hartzb@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project seeks to foster more effective provision of therapeutic services to substance-using treatment-seekers in our communities. This mentored early career development award will fund professional development activities and a sequence of three pilot research studies conducted over a 5-year period.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/integratingbehav

Title
Effectiveness of Safe Needle Disposal Programs for Injection Drug Users: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis
PIName
Anne Vernez Moudon, Dr. es Sc.
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Urban Design & Planning, Architecture
FundingAgency
Substance Abuse Policy Research Program, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Abstract
Drug users who inject illicit drugs in public spaces typically discard soiled needles ("discards") in or around those spaces. Discards pose a risk to public health, diminish community quality of life, and are a primary reason for local opposition to crucial health services for injection drug users. Eliminating needle discards is an important element of policies and programs intended to reduce the harms of public injection, but little research exists on the spatio-temporal patterns of discards and their relationship to the effectiveness of safe needle disposal alternatives.
Categories
Social Policy
ProjStart
April 2007
ProjEnd
September 2008
AwardAmt
$97,381
ProjStaff
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD (ADAI Senior Research Scientist, Co-P.I.)
AccessNo
109
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.saprp.org/grant_detail.cfm?appId=4161">RWJF SAPRP grant page</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
SAPRP, RWJF
PIBioSite
http://larch.be.washington.edu/people/moudon/moudon.php

Title
Pattern of Alcohol Use and Alcohol-Related Diagnoses among Drug Abusing/Dependent Participants
PIName
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD
PITitle
Director, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
Alcohol use, abuse, and dependence are common among individuals who are dependent on other drugs such as cocaine, other stimulants such as methamphetamine, and opiates. This secondary analysis of data from ten CTN protocols (CTN-0001, 0002, 0004, 0006, 0007, 0009, 0013, 0017, 0018, 0019) examines the pattern of alcohol use, alcohol-related diagnoses, and severity of other problems among a large sample of drug abusing/dependent participants enrolled in community-based drug treatment programs across the country.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
Descriptors
Secondary data analysis
Stimulant users
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, Ph.D.
AccessNo
111
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0040s.htm">CTN Library page for this Protocol </a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddonovan@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This study is a secondary analysis of data from ten CTN protocols, to examine the pattern of alcohol use, alcohol-related diagnoses, and severity of other problems among a large sample of drug abusing/dependent participants enrolled in community-based drug treatment programs within the NIDA Clinical Trials Network.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/patternalcuse

Title
Computer Adapted Standardized Patient for MI Skills Assessment - Phase II
ShortName
MI Skills Assessment / CASPI, Phase II
PIName
John S. Baer, PhD
PITitle
Research Professor, Psychology
Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5R42DA020284-03 and 2R42DA020284-02A1
Abstract
There is a great need to facilitate dissemination of empirically based methods in addiction treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported therapeutic approach developed by Miller and Rollnick (1991, 2002). Although there is high demand for MI training, there is a lack of low-cost, reliable, and ecologically valid assessment methods for evaluating training needs and outcomes (Baer et al., 2004).
<p>Investigators propose to develop and validate a novel method of assessing clinician skill with MI by creating a Computer-Adapted Standardized Patients Instrument (CASPI) with the potential to be used in any setting with a personal computer. The product would provide a widely accessible and cost- efficient alternative to existing methods of clinician MI skill assessment. If successful, the CASPI methodology could be developed for many empirically derived treatments. Methods to accurately assess clinician skills at modest costs should greatly facilitate dissemination of research-based interventions.
<p>In Phase I, we developed a prototype of the CASPI and conducted a pilot evaluation of usability, reliability, and concurrent validity with 23 addictions treatment professionals. Results showed that CASPI was well-received overall by providers, and has excellent internal reliability and highly encouraging preliminary concurrent validity with other established measures.
<p>In the current Phase II, we will develop a second form of the CASPI, build a computer-assisted scoring interface, and conduct a randomized study of the revised CASPI to evaluate it as an index of training outcomes. In addition, construct validity will be established in comparison with tapes of standardized patient encounters.
<p>ADAI is a sub-contractor for this project for Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
01-Sep-2005
ProjEnd
30-Apr-2011
AwardAmt
$930,383
ProjStaff
Michelle Hansten Ingalsbe
Bryan Hartzler, Ph.D.
Notes
PA-07-281
AccessNo
112
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7595805&icde=5805857">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
jsbaer@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
Low cost methods for the assessment of clinician skills are greatly needed to facilitate adoption of evidenced-based practice. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is empirically- based, effective, and a very popular therapeutic modality for substance abuse treatment. This project will develop a computer-based MI skills assessment instrument, which will be useful to MI trainers, training programs, treatment agencies, and researchers.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/miskillsasses

Title
Development and Evaluation of Context-Tailored Training
ShortName
MI Training
PIName
John S. Baer, PhD
PITitle
Research Professor, Psychology ; Affiliate, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
R01DA016360
Abstract
The development of empirically-supported treatments for substance abuse disorders, although productive over the past twenty years, has not been accompanied by an equal effort in the transfer, or dissemination of such approaches to standard practice. Dissemination appears unlikely to occur without specific efforts, including the training of professional staff in new techniques. Yet little is known about what types of training efforts are effective for different types of interventions for substance abuse treatment professionals with varying clinical skills and experience. In response to PA-03-126, NIDA Behavioral Therapy Development Program, the proposed Phase III research will develop and evaluate an innovative model for the training of counselors working in agencies providing substance abuse treatment. Based on concepts of technology transfer, change in practice behavior is seen as more likely in response to training that is tailored to the individual's professional needs and accompanied by contextual processes that remind, reinforce, and support changes in clinical practice. Training must also involve assessment and consultation in partnership with agencies providing substance abuse services. A "Context Tailored" training model will be developed for skills in Motivational Interviewing (MI), a clinical approach that has strong empirical support and for which training is often requested. The model will be pilot tested in two agencies. After revision, the training model will then be compared to a traditional CPE workshop in a small randomized trial with six additional agencies. The new, context based model is expected to achieve greater acquisition, maintenance and generalization of specific MI skills compared to a traditional CPE workshop, as assessed in practice with actual patients. The proposed research is designed to provide standardization and preliminary data-based support for context-tailored training. If successful, subsequent proposals for research on a much larger scale can test training effectiveness across a broad range of agencies, personnel, and topics.
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
June 1, 2004
ProjEnd
March 31, 2007
AwardAmt
$311,160
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, Ph.D. (Project Director)
Results
Imel ZE, Baldwin S, Baer JS, Hartzler B, Dunn C, Rosengren DR, Atkins D. Evaluating therapist adherence in motivational interviewing by comparing performance with standardized and real patients. J Consult Clin Psychol 2014 (in press)
Hartzler B, Beadnell B, Rosengren DB, Dunn CW, Baer JS. Deconstructing proficiency in motivational interviewing: Mechanics of skilful practitioner delivery during brief simulated encounters. Behav Cogn Psychother 2010 Jul 9:1-18. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3236613">Full text PMC3236613</a>
Baer JS, Wells EA, Rosengren DB, Hartzler B, Beadnell B, Dunn CW. Agency context and tailored training in technology transfer: A pilot evaluation of motivational interviewing training for community counselors. J Subst Abuse Treat 2009;37(2):191-202. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2737382/">Full text PMC2737382</a>
Rosengren DB, Hartzler B, Baer JS, Wells EA, Dunn CW. The Video Assessment of Simulated Encounters-Revised (VASE-R): reliability and validity of a revised measure of motivational interviewing skills. Drug Alcohol Depend 2008;97(1-2):130-138. <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2578843/">Full text PMC2578843</a>
Hartzler B, Baer JS, Dunn CW, Rosengren DB, Wells EA. What is seen through the looking glass: The impact of training on practitioner self-rating of motivational interviewing skills. Behav Cognit Psychother 2007;35:431-445.
AccessNo
113
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7047773&icde=5815715">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
jsbaer@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
The study compared MI training methods for substance abuse treatment practitioners in an RCT involving the eight community treatment programs of the Pacific Northwest Node of the NIDA CTN.

Title
Event-Level Analysis of Expectancies, Alcohol Use, and Consequences.
PIName
Christine Lee, PhD
PITitle
Research Assistant Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
1R01AA016979-01A2
Abstract
Alcohol use, misuse and resulting negative consequences among college students have been extensively documented. Despite substantial efforts and recent advances in understanding and preventing excessive consumption and related harm, considerable gaps in the literature regarding etiology and maintenance of high-risk college drinking remain. Prior research has documented that negative alcohol-related events can promote changes to drinking behavior, motivations for change, and cognitions related to drinking. The proposed study will help to understand how self-change might occur among young adult college students as a result of experienced negative consequences. In this proposal, we use an event-level perspective to examine the interrelationships of expectancies, drinking, and consequences. Using Interactive Voice Response (IVR), 400 college students will report on their expectancies, drinking, and alcohol-related consequences three times daily for four two-week intervals over one year. By using daily reports over time, we can ensure temporal relationships between expectancies, drinking, and consequences; minimize recall bias; investigate reciprocal relationships of expectancies, drinking and consequences; and examine both within- and between-person influences on drinking and consequences. Using multilevel modeling, we will (1) examine the daily relationships between alcohol expectancies and alcohol use; (2) study bidirectional influences of expectancies, consequences, and drinking over time; (3) examine whether the immediate consequences of drinking change subsequent expectancies and drinking over time; and (4) examine the time-varying and time-in varying moderators of the within-person relationships between expectancies, drinking, and consequences. The factors related to self-change are important for understanding the maintenance and fluctuations of high-risk drinking and may ultimately help inform interventions targeted to drinkers who are at risk for consequences but are not seeking intervention or treatment.
Categories
Behavioral Risk
Descriptors
Alcohol drinking
College students
Expectancies
Prevention
Interactive Voice Recognition (IVR)
ProjStart
April 1, 2010
ProjEnd
March 31, 2014
AwardAmt
$391,432
ProjStaff
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH (ADAI Senior Research Scientist, Co-P.I.)
AccessNo
114
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7887524&icde=5638093">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
leecm@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
Research has documented that negative alcohol-related events can promote changes to drinking behavior, motivations for change, and cognitions related to drinking among young adults and college students. The proposed study will help to understand how self-change might occur among young adult college students as a result of experienced negative consequences. The factors related to self-change are important for understanding the maintenance and fluctuations of high-risk drinking and may ultimately help inform interventions targeted to drinkers who are at risk for consequences but are not seeking intervention or treatment.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/eventlevelanalysis

Title
BASICS-ED: A Momentary Intervention for Concurrent Smoking and Heavy Drinking
PIName
Mary E. Larimer, PhD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5R21AA018336-02
Abstract
Heavy episodic drinking (HED) among college students is a persistent public health problem with severe consequences, including development of substance-use disorders, psychosocial problems, health risks, accidental injuries, and death. National US survey data indicate more than 80% of college students report consuming alcohol in the past year, with 44% reporting heavy episodic drinking (HED; 5/4 drinks per occasion for men/women) at least once in the previous 2 weeks. In addition, it has been reported that nearly all college smokers drink alcohol and usually smoking and HED co-occur. One National US survey found 98% of current smokers drank alcohol and 44-59% of drinkers smoked cigarettes. Furthermore, the co-occurrence risk was greatest among students who reported greater alcohol consumption (OR=4.21, p< .0001), having a drinking problem (OR = 3.31, p< .0001), and those who reported using drinking to cope with their problems (OR=2.19, p< .05).

<p>In order to achieve a better understanding of these risk behaviors and identify potential points for intervention, the overall aim of the proposed study is to develop an individually-tailored, computerized intervention targeting HED among college student smokers. The first aim of this research is to gain a better understanding of these processes using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). The information obtained from EMA daily reports of drinking and smoking will be used to model the dynamics of proximal influences on HED. The results from these models will thereby identify points of intervention for college student smokers who engage in HED. Following from this basic research, we plan to translate the models into an intervention that would be administered in real-time via an interactive program installed on an electronic device. The final aim of the proposed study will be to evaluate the efficacy of the empirically-based intervention in a randomized controlled trial comparing the computerized intervention to an electronic assessment-only control groups in a sample (n=126) of college student smokers who engage in HED. More specifically, the computerized intervention will incorporate components of the successful intervention, Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS), as well as a recently developed brief smoking intervention for non- treatment seeking college student smokers. The intervention, BASICS-ED, will be administered in real-time on an electronic device.

<p>The program will be developed using branching algorithms, such that ongoing assessment of momentary changes in an individual's environment will determine the selection and ordering of modules, providing individually-tailored BASICS messages and the smoking intervention in real-time.
Categories
Behavioral Risk
Descriptors
College students
Alcohol drinking
Tobacco use
ProjStart
September 15, 2009
ProjEnd
August 31, 2011
AwardAmt
$153,956
ProjStaff
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-PI)
Barbara C. Leigh, PhD, MPH. (ADAI Senior Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
<b>Note:</b> Dr. Witkiewitz was the original PI of this grant; when she moved to Washington State University-Vancouver, it was transferred to Dr. Larimer. Dr. Witkiewitz continues as Co-PI.)
AccessNo
115
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7932963&icde=5730588">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
larimer@u.washington.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/basicsed

Title
Re-Engagement in Evidence-Based Quitline Treatment for Low Income Smokers
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Cancer Institute
GrantNo
5R21CA141568-02
Abstract
Tobacco dependence is a chronic relapsing condition that usually requires repeat quit attempts from tobacco users and long-term behavioral and pharmacotherapy support to achieve long term abstinence. Unfortunately, most cessation programs are not designed to treat tobacco use as a chronic condition and offer only one-time treatments with a finite period of intervention. Low income smokers face even more challenges in benefiting from this "one-shot" approach, as their relapse rates are typically higher than average, due in part to obstacles related to maintaining behavioral change while working and socializing in environments that are more conducive to tobacco use. Quitlines typically serve a large proportion of low-income smokers and are often the only source of tobacco cessation support available to this population. An intervention that targets low income smokers to re-engage in quitline treatment could have great public health impact by exposing this hard to quit group to additional opportunities to receive customized, evidence-based telephone- based tobacco cessation treatment. Interactive voice response (IVR) systems are capable of proactively contacting individuals and can be programmed to provide targeted motivational and informational messages.

<P>The primary aims of this research are to 1) Develop an IVR system that delivers tailored audio messages to increase smokers' re-engagement in treatment offered by two state quit lines and 2) Evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an IVR system as a tool to reengage smokers into quitline treatment measured by number of IVR calls answered, number of smokers who re-engage in treatment and satisfaction with IVR calls. A secondary aim of this research is to obtain preliminary evidence of the efficacy of proactively re-engaging low income smokers into treatment on abstinence as compared to usual care. In the development phase of this proposal, smokers who have used quitline support in a previous quit attempt will be recruited and interviewed by telephone to support the development of tailored messages to encourage re-engagement in treatment among low income smokers. In the second phase, a randomized control trial will be conducted, with a sample of 3,000 smokers who used services from two state quitlines. Participants in the trial will be randomized to either receive usual care (no intervention to increase re-engagement) or the IVR intervention to increase re- engagement in treatment. Re-engagement in quitline treatment and quit rates will be measured at six month follow up.<p>ADAI has a subcontract from <b>Free and Clear, Inc</b> for its role in this project.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
September 1, 2009
ProjEnd
August 31, 2011
AwardAmt
$202,887
AccessNo
116
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7921467&icde=5837881">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
<a href="http://www.freeclear.com/">Free & Clear, Inc.</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCI
PIEmail
bia@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/evidencebasedquitline

Title
Technology-Enhanced Quitline Services to Prevent Smoking Relapse
PIName
Anna M. McDaniel, PhD, RN, FAAN
PIDept
Indiana Unviersity-Perdue University at Indianapolis
FundingAgency
National Cancer Institute
GrantNo
5R01CA138936-02
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of IVR technology for enhancing a widely used tobacco treatment service delivery model (Free & Clear's Quit for Life(R) program) to prevent smoking relapse and achieve abstinence. Our technology will enhance quitline services through (1) screening individuals during the post quit date period for increased risk of relapse and (2) providing evidence-based telephone counseling at the point of need tailored to the individual's extant risk factors. Using IVR monitoring, individuals will be screened for specific indicators of increased risk for relapse including smoking lapse, physical withdrawal symptoms, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, decreased self-efficacy for quitting, and decreased motivation to quit. In addition to these well-established predictors of relapse, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the risk of relapse is most intense during the first two weeks post-quit.

<P>Thus we propose to compare two models for timing and frequency of IVR screening. In the Technology Enhanced Quitline (TEQ) arm, 10 proactive IVR calls will be placed at decreasing frequency for 8 weeks post-quit (twice a week for the first two weeks, then weekly). In the High Intensity Technology-Enhanced Quitline (HI-TEQ) arm, 20 proactive IVR calls will be placed over the 8 weeks post-quit (daily for the first 2 weeks, then weekly). The proposed study is a randomized controlled trial to compare smoking abstinence and cost-effectiveness at 6 and 12 months among participants in the Quit for Life quitline program. Three treatment groups will be compared, namely (1) standard Quit for Life care, (2) IVR monitoring of risk for smoking relapse in combination with telephone-based tobacco cessation treatment service (TEQ), and (3) high frequency monitoring of risk for smoking relapse in combination with telephone- based tobacco cessation treatment service (HI-TEQ). Subjects will be recruited from three large clients (two employers and one health plan client) of the Free & Clear Quit for Life telephone-based tobacco cessation treatment program.

<p>If successful, this intervention could be incorporated into existing quitline protocols and delivered to millions of individuals who are trying to quit smoking, meeting a significant public health need for the dissemination of effective smoking cessation interventions. Public Health Relevance: Relapse after smoking cessation is an important health concern and is the most significant problem faced by individuals who are attempting to maintain abstinence from smoking.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
Clinical and Health Services
Prevention Research
ProjStart
March 1, 2009
ProjEnd
January 31, 2011
AwardAmt
$571,272
ProjStaff
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
117
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7780083&icde=5838034">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCI
PIBioSite
http://nursing.iupui.edu/directory/amcdanie
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/techquitline

Title
Web-Based Skills Training: SBIRT-PC
PIName
Susan Stoner, PhD
PIDept
Talaria, Inc. (Seattle)
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
271200900035C-2-0-1
Abstract
The goal of this NIDA SBIR project is to design, develop and to evaluate a web-based training program to teach screening and brief intervention for substance use problems to primary care physicians. The WBT will be designated to train PCPs to screen, intervene, and refer for substance problems and to support the use and maintenance of those skills with reference guides, screening tools and location-specific referral databases.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
Training / Information
ProjStart
2009
ProjEnd
2011
AwardAmt
$364,862
ProjStaff
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
Kelly M. Carpenter, PhD (Co-PI)
AccessNo
118
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8014425&icde=0">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/sbirt-pc

Title
ADepT GIS: Alcohol and Drug Epidemiology and Treatment Geographic Information Service
PIName
Joseph Kabel, PhD
PITitle
President, Looking Glass Analytics, Inc.
FundingAgency
Looking Glass Analytics
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Northwest Crime and Social Research, Inc.
GrantNo
HHSN271200800021C
Abstract
[ADAI has a subcontract to support the work of Dr. Banta-Green on this project].
<p>

LGAN was awarded a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase II contract from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to continue development of ADEpT GIS (Alcohol and Drug Epidemiology and Treatment Geographic Information Service), an internet-based software application that allows users to generate statistical analyses, maps, and reports on community-level measures of substance abuse. This web service augments the work of groups like the NIDA-sponsored Community Epidemiological Workgroups by providing a data repository and accessible analysis system for reporting and surveillance purposes. Phase I activities have demonstrated the technical feasibility of our approach through substantial development of a prototype online information system for reporting on drug epidemiology. During the two-year Phase II period, LGAN will add new data and new mapping and analysis tools to ADEpT GIS. These enhancements will broaden and deepen the understanding of the extent and impacts of substance abuse in King County, WA for public health professionals, treatment program administrators and law enforcement.

<p>
The PIs are Joseph Kabel and Bill Luchansky, of Looking Glass Analytics, Inc. Dr. Banta-Green is consulting on several content and methodological areas including the stability, accuracy and utility of various rates of substance abuse at small levels of geography derived from several different sources.
Categories
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
Descriptors
Bioengineering
Drug Abuse (NIDA only)
Networking and Information Technology R&D
Substance Abuse
ProjStart
July 14, 2008
ProjEnd
July 13, 2011
ProjStaff
Bill Luchansky, Looking Glass Analytics, Inc. (LGAN); Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW (ADAI Research Scientist)
AccessNo
119
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.lgan.com/">Looking Glass Analytics, Inc</a>.
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7676617&icde=6524179">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/adeptgis

Title
Evaluation of a Public Health Law to Support Intervening in Drug Overdose
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
GrantNo
RWJF # 68396
Abstract
This study will examine the legal intent, implementation and outcomes of a new Washington state law to support intervening in drug overdoses. The law includes a "911 Good Samaritan" component that provides legal immunity from drug possession charges for people who overdose or seek aid for another person’s overdose. It also allows the prescribing of an opioid antidote medicine (naloxone) to drug users and their partners. Evaluation will be conducted on the development of the legislation and the impact of the law on Seattle area heroin users, bystanders, and police during overdoses as well as the impacts on community health outcomes.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
Social Policy
ProjStart
November 15, 2010
ProjEnd
May 14, 2012
AwardAmt
$149,185
ProjStaff
Patricia Kuszler, MD, JD (Co-PI); Phillip Coffin MD MIA (Co-Investigator); Jennie Schoeppe, Research Coordinator
AccessNo
121
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.rwjf.org/grants/grant.jsp?id=68396">Project on RWJF website</a>
<a href="http://stopoverdose.org">StopOverdose.org website</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
RWJF
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
Logo
http://adai.washington.edu/images/stopodbox.jpg
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/publicodlaw

Title
Alcohol Use Trajectories and Prevention: A US - Sweden Comparison
PIName
Mary E. Larimer, PhD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
1U01AA018276-01A1
Abstract
Alcohol misuse during emerging adulthood is an international public health problem. This research evaluates trajectories and prevention of alcohol use, using the framework of the Theory of Triadic Influence to evaluate transitions into and out of heavy drinking across emerging adulthood. The international comparison allows for disentangling of effects of development from other factors including matriculation into college and attaining legal drinking age, and impacts of distal cultural factors which vary between the US and Sweden. ADAI Research Scientist Katie Witkiewitz has a subcontract to work on this project.
Categories
Prevention Research
Behavioral Risk
Descriptors
College students
Alcohol drinking
ProjStart
May 5, 2010
ProjEnd
April 30, 2015
AwardAmt
$566,868
ProjStaff
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist, co-investigator)
AccessNo
122
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=7890864&icde=6141924">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
larimer@u.washington.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/alcoholusetrajectories

Title
Mindfulness-based Relapse Prevention: Efficacy and Mechanisms
PIName
G. Alan Marlatt, PhD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychology
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5R01DA025764-02
Abstract
[ADAI has a subcontract to support the participation of Katie Witkiewitz on this project].

<p>The broad, long-term objective of the proposed randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the efficacy, moderators and mechanisms of change of two cognitive-behavioral aftercare treatments for alcohol and other drug (AOD) use disorders in preventing AOD relapse compared to standard aftercare (SA) offered in the community. The two cognitive-behavioral aftercare treatments are relapse prevention (RP; Daley & Marlatt, 2006) and Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MBRP), which integrates mindfulness meditation and RP aftercare components.

<p>The proposed research plan will address three specific aims. The first aim is to examine the efficacy of MBRP and RP compared to SA in preventing AOD relapse following intensive inpatient (IP) and outpatient (IOP) AOD treatment. Participants will be recruited from IP and IOP treatment and randomized to 8 weeks of MBRP, RP or SA. Treatment efficacy, as defined by reductions in AOD use and related consequences, will be evaluated at posttreatment and 3-, 6-, 9- and 12- month follow-up assessments. It is hypothesized that both MBRP and RP will result in significantly less AOD use and related consequences compared to SA. The second specific aim is to evaluate potential mediators of MBRP and RP treatment efficacy. It is proposed that the MBRP and RP interventions will be differentially effective in reducing AOD use and consequences based on the unique objectives of each treatment approach. It is therefore hypothesized that MBRP efficacy will be mediated by metacognitive processes, locus of control, mindfulness, thought suppression, ability to cope with craving and negative affect, experiential avoidance, emotion regulation and intensity of meditation practice. It is further hypothesized that RP efficacy will be mediated by negative affect, positive expectancies, self-efficacy and coping abilities. The final aim is to test potential moderators of treatment efficacy. It is hypothesized that participants with higher baseline levels of avoidant coping, experiential avoidance and lower levels of emotion regulation will benefit more from MBRP vs. RP treatments; whereas participants with lower self-efficacy and higher positive expectancies at baseline will benefit more from RP vs. MBRP treatments.

<p>In fulfilling these specific aims, the proposed research will address the NIDA mission for Stage II treatment research by examining the efficacy, moderators and differential mechanisms of change of various AOD aftercare treatments. Further, the proposed research is designed to gain a better understanding of why these treatments work and for whom.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Prevention Research
ProjStart
August 1, 2009
ProjEnd
July 31, 2011
AwardAmt
$698,195
ProjStaff
Katie Witkiewitz, PhD (ADAI Research Scientist)
Notes
PA-07-070
AccessNo
123
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7894942&icde=6521342">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
kate19@u.washington.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/mindfulnessrelapse

Title
Center for Neuroregulation in Alcohol Dependence (CENIAD)
ShortName
CENIAD
PIName
Andrew J. Saxon, MD
PITitle
Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5P20AA017839-02
Abstract
[This grant is awarded to the <a href="http://www.sibcr.org/">Seattle Institute for Biomedical/Clinical Research</a>]

<p> The Developmental Center for Neuroregulation in Alcohol Dependence (CeNiAD) grew from the clinical observation that the CNS active generic alpha-one adrenoreceptor (AR) antagonist prazosin reduced or eliminated alcohol drinking in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid alcohol dependence. Recently we demonstrated in placebo-controlled studies that prazosin reduces alcohol consumption in two animal models of alcohol dependence and in a human study in persons with alcohol dependence but without PTSD. Our clinical observation, our compelling prazosin preclinical and clinical treatment data, emerging neuroscience data implicating the CM AR in mechanisms of addiction, and the presence at VA Puget Sound and the University of Washington of a critical mass of faculty investigating alcohol dependence have led to the proposed developmental center.

<p>The CeNiAD has the following goals: (1) To create an interdisciplinary translational research team investigating alpha-one adrenergic receptor (AR) and other neuroregulatory mechanisms and interventions in alcohol use disorders (ADD); (2) To establish the collaborations, facilities, research capabilities, preliminary findings, career development opportunities, intellectual milieu and planning process to justify an application for a future new Specialized P50 Alcohol Research Center. An Administrative Core will support the scientific mission, develop and coordinate career development of basic and clinical AUD investigators, provide biostatistics and data management support, and provide the planning process for a future P50 Center. A distinguished External Advisory Board will help guide the CeNiAD in these activities. There will be two first wave exploratory projects and two first wave pilot projects. Exploratory Project 1 addresses effects of pharmacologic reduction of noradrenergic signaling in alcohol ingestion in alcohol preferring rats. Exploratory Project 2 is a placebo-controlled prazosin trial in persons with co-occurring alcohol dependence and PTSD. Pilot Project 1 addresses prazosin effects on cue-induced alcohol craving in humans. Pilot Project 2 addresses prazosin effects on alcohol craving and consumption in military returnees from Iraq and Afghanistan with PTSD. A process for solicitation and review of especially relevant additional exploratory and pilot projects has been established to support a second wave of such projects in the second 2.5 years of the CeNiAD.

<p>Dr. Donovan will serve as a member of the CeNIAD Executive Committee and provide input on all aspects of CeNIAD research, training, and center development.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Sep 30, 2009
ProjEnd
Aug 31, 2011
AwardAmt
$495,542
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (Director, ADAI, and Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences)
AccessNo
124
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7944181&icde=6521615">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/ceniad

Title
Alcohol and Women's Health Risk Reduction: An Innovative Experimental Approach
PIName
Tina M. Zawacki, PhD (University of Texas San Antonio)
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
1R21AA018403-01A1
Abstract
Sexually transmitted diseases pose an increasingly serious health threat to women, and alcohol consumption may increase women's risky decision-making and behavior with regard to these risks. The proposed project will examine this major public health concern by studying the influence of alcohol on risk reduction skills.

<p>The goal of the proposed research is to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases by delineating the mechanisms through which alcohol affects risk reduction behavioral skills. Rates of sexually transmitted diseases remain high. Survey research suggests that young women are not skilled at behaviors that reduce this risk, and alcohol consumption may further impair these behavioral skills. Although previous studies have contributed valuable information about alcohol's relationship to unsafe sex, there is a paucity of experimental research involving actual behavioral responses during social interactions. The proposed study utilizes experimental methods in order to investigate alcohol's effects on women's behavioral skills at negotiating safe sex during a face-to-face role-play with an opposite-sex actor.

<p>The theoretical underpinnings of the proposed research are the Cognitive Mediation Model of Sexual Decision Making (Norris, Masters, & Zawacki, 2004), Alcohol Myopia Theory (Taylor & Leonard, 1983), and Alcohol Expectancy Theory (MacAndrew & Edgerton, 1969). The proposed study is a laboratory experiment using a 3 (Alcohol condition of participant: No Alcohol, Placebo, Alcohol - .08 BAC) X 2 (Relationship Context: New, Established) design. Alcohol consumption and characteristics of the role-play contexts are manipulated in the proposed laboratory experiment. Manipulated characteristics of the role-play reflect aspects of sexual decision-making that may create response conflict for women. Theories about alcohol's effects on cognition suggest that it is high response conflict situations that are especially vulnerable to alcohol-related risk taking. Each laboratory session will be videotaped and coded in order to assess participants' risk reduction behavior during the role-play. Self-report dependent measures will assess constructs of a recently developed Cognitive Mediation Model so that its utility in explaining alcohol- involved risk taking can be tested. Prior to the laboratory session, participants' alcohol expectancies will be assessed as a potential moderator of alcohol's effects on participants' negotiation behavior and cognitive model variables. The study paradigm was designed to simulate real situations in which safer-sex negotiations commonly occur. The results can be used to develop prevention programs that reduce women's risk taking when drinking. These results will be most informative for programs aimed at the reduction of risk for sexually transmitted diseases.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
Descriptors
alcoholic beverage consumption
high risk behavior/lifestyle
safe sex/sex abstinence
sex behavior
substance abuse related behavior
women's health
HIV infection
adolescence (12-20)
age difference
condom
decision making
disease/disorder proneness/risk
expectancy
neuropharmacology
psychological model
young adult human (21-34)
behavioral/social science research tag
clinical research
female
human subject
questionnaire
ProjStart
July 20, 2010
ProjEnd
June 30, 2012
AwardAmt
$224,669
ProjStaff
Jeanette Norris, PhD (ADAI Senior Research Scientist)
Notes
PA-09-164
AccessNo
125
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7990063&icde=6522860">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/alcoholwomenriskreduce

Title
Women's HIV Risk: Alcohol Intoxication, Victimization History, & Partner Factors
PIName
William H. George, PhD
PITitle
Associate Professor
PIDept
Psychology
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5R01AA016281-04
Abstract
HIV infection is currently the 6th leading cause of death among American women aged 25-34 years, and heterosexual contact accounts for 80% of HIV infections in women. Highly controlled laboratory experiments have indicated that alcohol intoxication fosters HIV-related risk behaviors; this may be particularly true among women with a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) or later sexual assault (SA), who it is estimated comprise over 20% of all women. Research has also shown CSA-positive (CSA+) and SA-positive (SA+) women are at higher risk of HIV infection than those without such a history. This heightened risk may in part be related to alcohol use. Because the bulk of the extant research has been descriptive and correlational, virtually nothing is known about how alcohol and contextual factors such as partner characteristics operate in-the-moment to affect sexual decision-making (SDM) processes of CSA+/SA+ women, potentially increasing their risk of contracting HIV. The present project addresses this knowledge gap. Two large scale alcohol administration experiments will examine risky SDM processes among female social drinkers, aged 21-30, with and without victimization histories, in an experimental dating analogue. Drawing on existing theory, one type of partner characteristic will be manipulated in each experiment: a recent partner's relationship potential (low v. high); and an ongoing partner's pressure to have unprotected intercourse (low pressure vs. high pressure). Alcohol myopia theory will be employed as a potentially useful theoretical framework. Possible mediators of the risky SDM-alcohol connection that will be investigated in-the-moment include risk perception, self-efficacy, and anticipated partner reaction to condom negotiation. Potential moderating influences of background characteristics will also be explored, including alcohol expectancies and drinking habits, sensation seeking, traumatic sexualization, condom attitudes and sexual experiences, as well as prior victimization factors, such as type, age, and severity. <p>Relevance: The proposed studies will advance our understanding of in-the-moment dynamics of risky HIV-related decision-making and behavior in intoxicated and sober binge-drinking women who have and have not been sexually victimized. Findings will greatly inform designers of prevention programs, who remain frustrated in their efforts to stem the spread of HIV in women and eager to learn of new and promising targets for intervention. The information gleaned from the proposed studies could be used to design HIV prevention programs that work for social-drinking women, particularly those with a history of victimization, a substantial but underserved population.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
September 27, 2007
ProjEnd
August 31, 2012
ProjStaff
Jeanette Norris, PhD (ADAI Senior Research Scientist) (Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
126
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7921472&icde=6756655">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
bgeorge@u.washington.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/womenshivrisk

Title
Alcohol and Condom Use Resistance in Sexually Coercive/Violent Men
PIName
Kelly Cue Davis, PhD
PITitle
Research Assistant Professor
PIDept
Social Work
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5R01AA017608-02
Abstract
Emerging scientific evidence demonstrates that men's use of sexual coercion/violence (SCV) against women plays a critical role in risky sexual decision-making processes. Moreover, independent streams of research implicate alcohol intoxication in both violent and risky sexual behavior. Although the linkages among heterosexual women's alcohol use, SCV victimization, and sexual risk have received modest research consideration, the interplay of heterosexual men's alcohol intoxication, SCV perpetration, and risky sexual behavior has received little empirical attention. The overarching objectives of the proposed research are 1) to augment our understanding of the alcohol-SCV-risky sexual behavior nexus through an empirical examination of the influence of men's alcohol intoxication on their commission of risky and violent sexual behaviors and 2) to investigate the effects of alcohol intoxication and SCV history on men's responses to a variety of women's condom use requests.

<p>Drawing upon Alcohol Myopia Theory, Alcohol Expectancy Theory, and the Theories of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior (TRA/TPB), two experiments are proposed to investigate the influence of alcohol [Sober, Placebo (expect .04%), Moderate Dose (.04%), and High Dose (.08%)] and SCV-related factors on high risk men's outcome and normative beliefs, attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions regarding condom use resistance, unprotected sex, and SCV perpetration in a hypothetical sexual situation with a female partner. Female partner condom request factors, such as risk rationale (Experiment 1) and condom request style (Experiment 2), will also be manipulated between subjects. The role of background factors, such as SCV history, SCV-related attitudes, and alcohol expectancies, will also be assessed. We hypothesize that acute alcohol intoxication, as well as SCV-related factors, will influence TRA/TPB-related constructs and that measurement of these constructs in an intoxicated state will best predict real-world intoxicated sexual risk behavior as examined through 6-week and 3-month follow-up behavioral surveys of experiment participants. Findings from the proposed research will refine TRA/TPB models of risky and violent sexual behavior in three important ways: (1) by examining the influence of alcohol and SCV-related factors on relevant social cognitive constructs, (2) by allowing a novel examination of these TRA/TPB constructs in the context of in-the-moment intoxicated vs. sober states, and (3) by assessing the effects of condom request factors on men's condom use resistance and risky/violent sexual intentions. Findings have implications for preventions programs and clinical interventions, particularly those regarding alcohol- influenced risky sexual behavior and sexual violence. <p>RELEVANCE: Two major public health concerns in the United States involve sexual behavior: sexual coercion/violence and sexually transmitted infections. Alcohol intoxication in men has been linked to increased sexual violence and increased risky sexual behavior. The proposed project thus has relevance for both women's and men's health by seeking to close key knowledge gaps regarding the relationships among men's intoxication, sexual violence, and sexual risk behavior in ways informative to sexual risk and sexual violence prevention efforts.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
March 10, 2009
ProjEnd
March 31, 2014
ProjStaff
Jeanette Norris, PhD (ADAI Senior Research Scientist) (Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
127
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7783874&icde=6756463">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
kcue@u.washington.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/violentmen

Title
CBPR with Tribal Colleges and Universities: Alcohol Problems and Solutions
PIName
Bonnie M. Duran, Dr Ph
PITitle
Associate Professor, Health Services
PIDept
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, School of Social Work
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5RO1DA029001-02
Abstract
Although there is some evidence that there is a large dispartity in American Indians and Alaska Natives alcohol, drug abuse and mental disorder prevalence rates, there has never been a study of problem drinking, drug use or mental disosrders at any ofthe 34 US Tribal colleges or universities (TCU); and existing data is not comparable. Student characteristics, enrollment, funding, faculty and staff composition, and economic context are drastically different in tribal colleges from non-tribal institutions; there is little external validity for studies conducted among other college populations. The long-term vision of this research is to reduce alcohol, drug and mental disorder (ADM) related-health disparities for American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIAN), and to increase postsecondary academic success.

<p>This research project aims to conduct the first study of alcohol related problems at TCU and is the preliminary research needed to develop culturally appropriate and sustainable alcohol interventions at Northwest Indian College (NWIC) and other tribal colleges in the U.S. by using a community-based participatory research approach.

<p>Aims are to: l.Compile and summarize the epidemiologic literature regarding AIAN college student alcohol and drug consumption patterns and mental disorder problems and interventions; 2. Conduct a needs and capacity assessment survey with 34 TCU to document what is known about ADM prevalence and susceptibility; b.Risk, protective factors and outcomes of ADM including academic outcomes;c.The extent of clinical level problems such as alcohol and drug abuse and dependence, common mental disorders and comorbidity; d. Best, promising and current practices for ADM prevention, screening, treatment and referral services; and e.TCU organizational capacity for student ADM interventions and academic programs; 3. Conduct focus groups to identify a menu of core elements of a comprehensive ADM intervention that is culturally appropriate, sustainable and evidence-supported; b.Effective ways to conduct outreach and screening for ADM services; and 4. Disseminate study findings broadly.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
ProjStart
September 30, 2009
ProjEnd
August 31, 2013
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Investigator
AccessNo
128
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.iwri.org/">Indigenous Wellness Research Institute/UW</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7938725&icde=6848926">NIH RePORTer record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/cbprtribal

Title
Disseminating Organizational SBI Services (DO-SBIS) at Trauma Centers.
PIName
Douglas Zatzick, MD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5 R01 AA016102-04
Abstract
Each year in the United States approximately 2.5 million individuals are so severely injured that they require inpatient hospital admission. The integration of screening and brief interventions (SBI) into acute injury care has the potential to markedly increase the number of patients who receive needed services and has been a longstanding public health objective. In January of 2005 the American College of Surgeons, the primary agency responsible for developing trauma center requirements, passed a landmark resolution mandating that level I trauma centers must screen injured patients for an alcohol use disorder, and provide an intervention to those who screen positive. Preliminary studies suggest that there is a substantial risk that the SBI mandate will be implemented with marked variability and that low quality SBI procedures could become the default standard of trauma center care.

<p>The goal of the Disseminating Organizational Screening and Brief Interventions Services (DO-SBIS) investigation is to capitalize on the unique opportunity afforded by the American College of Surgeons' mandate by taking early steps to insure high quality, evidence-based SBI services are implemented and outcomes are assessed. In the first phase of the investigation, SBI services will be assessed for all 190 level I trauma centers in the United States. In the second phase of the investigation, 20 level I trauma centers will be selected for randomization to intervention or control conditions. Providers at each intervention trauma center will receive workshop training and ongoing telephone coaching in the delivery of evidence-based motivational interviewing (Ml) intervention; Ml training will be embedded within evidence-based organizational development activities that aim to facilitate the integration of SBI services into routine trauma center care. Control trauma centers will implement SBI care as usual.

<p>The investigation hypothesizes that intervention trauma centers, when compared to control trauma centers, will demonstrate higher quality SBI, as evidenced by greater provider proficiency in SBI delivery, significant reductions in 6- and 12-month post-injury alcohol use in patients receiving SBI, and enhanced organizational acceptance of SBI services. Without DO-SBIS baseline data on SBI services and follow-up RCT data on patient, provider, and organizational outcomes, a critical opportunity to provide empiric support of a historic policy decision to require alcohol services at level I trauma centers could be lost. The DO-SBIS interdisciplinary research group includes trauma surgery opinion leaders who are dedicated to implementing future policy mandates that derive from the DO-SBIS research program. Future mandates will aim to strengthen and refine trauma center delivery of evidence-based SBI services.
<p>The dissemination of high quality SBI services at level I trauma centers has the potential to influence alcohol policy in other health care settings nationwide.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
August 1, 2007
ProjEnd
July 31, 2012
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Investigator
AccessNo
129
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7900415&icde=6849104">NIH RePORTer Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/sbiservicestrauma

Title
Brief Intervention in Primary Care for Problem Drug Use and Abuse
PIName
Peter Roy-Byrne, MD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5 R01 DA026014-03
Abstract
This project is evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention that has recently been approved as a billable service in the medical care setting, despite the absence of data supporting its use in drug abuse and dependence. The results of the study will have implications for whether it is advisable to expand its application beyond hazardous alcohol abuse to include abuse of drugs.

<p>A substantial body of research has established the effectiveness of brief interventions (BI) for hazardous alcohol use in patients seen in medical settings, prompting the implementation of dissemination projects of screening and brief intervention for "substance abuse" on a widespread scale. However, there are few studies examining the efficacy of BI for problem drug use and abuse in medical settings, and there is considerable variability in what actually constitutes a BI (i.e., what are the important or active therapeutic ingredients). The potential costs related to untreated drug abuse in medical settings are substantial. Although there is great human suffering and morbidity for the abuser, it is likely that potential healthcare cost savings and decreased adverse healthcare outcomes related to BI will be the major drivers of policy change to improve provision of BI treatment.

<p>Accordingly, this application proposes to conduct a policy-relevant clinical trial with broad external validity (a hybrid "efficacy-effectiveness" study) informed by the literature on BI and alcohol use, to evaluate the efficacy of BI and referral to treatment when indicated, in patients with problem drug use and abuse seen in the primary care medical setting at a large safety-net hospital. The study has four aims: (1) to determine if BI is effective in reducing drug use and increasing completed referral to treatment (i.e., treatment initiation); (2) to test whether higher fidelity to a BI model that emphasizes motivational interviewing is more effective than lower fidelity; (3) to estimate the impact of BI on several public health outcomes; (4) to estimate the costs of the intervention, potential cost offsets, and incremental cost-effectiveness from the payer perspective based on health care service use and drug use frequency.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
September 1, 2008
ProjEnd
June 30, 2013
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Investigator
AccessNo
130
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7888129&icde=6849196">NIH RePORTer Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/briefinterprimarycare

Title
Preventing Addiction Related Suicide
PIName
Richard Ries, MD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5 R21 DA026494-02
Abstract
This proposal aims to improve drug and alcohol addiction treatment by developing and testing a behavioral suicide education and prevention module for integration into standard intensive outpatient addiction treatment. Addiction is a potent risk factor for suicide and suicidal behavior. Although studies show that suicide or suicide attempts are 10 to 50 times more frequent among people with addiction disorders-and even higher among people requiring addiction treatment-no suicide prevention efforts have been developed and tested specifically for addiction treatment settings.

<p>The key aims of this R21 exploratory research proposal are: 1) to develop the Preventing Addiction Related Suicide (PARS) module, a suicide risk reduction training and intervention program that can be incorporated into standard group-based, intensive outpatient program (IOP) addiction treatment; 2) to obtain pilot data on its acceptance and feasibility, as rated by IOP patients and counselors; and 3) to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and adaptive behaviors about suicide prevention following exposure to the PARS, as rated by addiction treatment participants and counselors at two NIDA CTN (Clinical Trials Network) addiction treatment agencies.
Categories
Prevention Research
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
MAY 15, 2009
ProjEnd
April 30, 2011
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Investigator
AccessNo
131
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7842619&icde=6849251">NIH RePORTer Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/addictionrelsuicide

Title
Mindful Awareness in Body-Oriented Therapy for Women's Substance Abuse Treatment: A Feasibility Study
PIName
Cynthia Price, PhD
PITitle
Research Assistant Professor
PIDept
Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
5 R21 DA024771-02
Abstract
The broad, long-term objective of the current research is to improve substance abuse treatment for women through an innovative mind-body approach, 'Mindful Awareness in Body-Oriented Therapy' (MABT). The MABT approach is designed to enhance embodiment and to facilitate mindfulness through the combination of massage, body awareness exercises and the acquisition of mindfulness skills. The treatment goals of MABT include reduction of avoidant coping responses, increase of emotional-regulation, and decrease of trauma symptoms through access to and acceptance (vs. avoidance) of sensory and emotional experience. These are thought to be important for relapse prevention given the positive association between stress, negative affect and relapse; and risk of relapse associated with PTSD symptoms.

<p>The specific aims of the research are to: 1) to examine feasibility of recruitment to and retention in MABT as an adjunct to substance abuse treatment, 2) describe intervention acceptability, and 3) compare the effect of body-oriented therapy vs. treatment-as-usual on reported days abstinent for substance use in order to estimate effect size. The trial will involve a two-group repeated measures design in which participants are assigned to either the Treatment-as- Usual comparison group or the MABT experimental group, also receiving usual care. Both conditions will be compared at baseline, post-intervention, and at six and nine month follow-up.

<p> This study involves examination of the MABT intervention as a complement to treatment-as-usual within a comprehensive substance abuse treatment program for women. The research will contribute to a program of research in body-oriented therapy.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
May 1, 2008
ProjEnd
April 30, 2011
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences)
AccessNo
132
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7617214&icde=6849580">NIH RePORTer Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/mindfulaware

Title
Screening Motivational Assessment and Referral to Treatment in Emergency Departments (SMART-ED): Evaluation of Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) and Booster Session for Drug Use Patients Presenting for Treatment in the Emergency Department
ShortName
SMART-ED
PIName
Michael Bogenschutz, MD
PIDept
Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions (CASAA), University of New Mexico
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
NIDA-CTN-0047
Abstract
This study is a protocol for NIDA's National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). It builds on the knowledge base in developing and implementing screening and brief interventions for harmful and hazardous alcohol use delivered in emergency departments and trauma centers, by transferring and evaluating these procedures when applied to drug use.

<p>The study will contrast substance use and substance-related outcomes among patients endorsing problematic substance use during an emergency department (ED) visit who are randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: 1) minimal screening only (MSO); 2) screening, assessment, and referral to treatment (if indicated) (SAR); and 3) screening, assessment, and referral plus a brief intervention (BI) with two telephone follow-up booster sessions (BI-B). The primary outcome is days of use of the patient-defined primary problem drug at 3 months following enrollment. Secondary outcomes include change from baseline in days of use of the primary substance, the number days abstinent from all drugs, days of heavy drinking, total quantity of drug use, objective change in drug use based on analysis of hair samples, self-reported consequences of drug and alcohol use, percent entering treatment among those classified as having probable dependence, and ED and other health care utilization.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD (ADAI Director, Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences) Co-Principal Investigator
AccessNo
133
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0047.htm">CTN Dissemination Library Protocol page</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/smartedeval

Title
Psychology Training in Alcohol Research
ShortName
PTAR
PIName
Mary E. Larimer, PhD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
5T32AA007455
Abstract
Dr. Donovan serves as a primary faculty member and mentor for a NIAAA-funded T32 pre- and postdoctoral training program. This program is housed in the Center for the Study of Health Risk Behaviors (CSHRB) within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Principal Investigator is Mary Larimer.
<p>
This 2-year fellowship provides training for individuals who wish to pursue a career in alcohol research, with an emphasis on the etiology and prevention of problem drinking and alcohol dependence. As this topic will be approached from both psychosocial and bio-behavioral perspectives, individuals with background training in relevant areas of psychology (clinical, health psychology, behavioral neuroscience, social, developmental, cognitive, behavioral pharmacology, etc.) are encouraged to apply. Both human and animal research is supported.
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
July 1, 1984
ProjEnd
June 30, 2019
ProjStaff
Dennis M. Donovan, PhD Professor Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director, Alcohol & Drug Abuse Institute)
AccessNo
134
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://depts.washington.edu/cshrb/newweb/postdoc.html">CSHRB Postdoc Training page</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=7891440&icde=6863304">NIH RePORTERer record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/ptarlarimer

Title
Smokefree Hospitals Initiative
PIName
Abigail Halperin, MD, MPH
PITitle
Director, Tobacco Studies Program
PIDept
Family Medicine & Health Services
FundingAgency
Public Health - Seattle & King County
Abstract
The goals of this project are support the institution of 100% smoke-free campus policies at University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) and all other King County hospitals and affiliated clinics without an existing policies and pilot a systems change project to integrate evidence-based treatment of tobacco use and dependence at the UWMC campus that can be used as a basis for programs at other hospitals.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
ProjStart
2010
ProjEnd
2012
ProjStaff
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH, (ADAI Research Scientist)
AccessNo
136
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
PHSKC
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/smokefreehospitals

Title
Increasing Post-Discharge Follow-up Among Hospitalized Smokers
PIName
Kimber P. Richter, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Associate Professor, Preventive Medicine & Public Health
PIDept
University of Kansas Medical Center
FundingAgency
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
GrantNo
1 U01 HL105232-01
Abstract
The primary aim of this project is to test the effects of warm transfer versus fax referral on quitline enrollments, post-discharge counseling adherence and smoking cessation. The secondary aim of this project is to determine mediators of the treatment effects on enrollment, post-discharge counseling and cessation.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
Clinical and Health Services
ProjStart
Sept 20, 2010
ProjEnd
May 31, 2014
ProjStaff
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
137
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8015442&icde=8401623">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIH/NHLBI
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/postdischargesmokers

Title
Washington Tribes and RAIO Health Priorities Summit
PIName
Lisa Rey Thomas, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
GrantNo
OPP1038263
Abstract
The Washington Tribes and Recognized American Indian Organizations (RAIO) Health Priorities Summit will invite leaders from the 29 federally recognized Tribes and the five RAIOs in Washington State for one and one-half days to work together to identify and document: 1) health priorities or issues of greatest concern in the Tribal and American Indian/Alaska Native communities and urban areas, 2) promising practices that are in place or in development in these communities, and 3) gaps in health services and strategies for addressing these shortcomings. These dialogues will result in a report that prioritizes health needs, resources and gaps with regards to the health of AIAN people in WA State to make recommendations and guide policy. In addition, the report will serve to develop a health research agenda driven by Tribes and RAIOs.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
ProjStart
June 24, 2011
ProjEnd
June 30, 2012
AwardAmt
$75,000
AccessNo
138
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCMHD
PIEmail
lrthomas@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_thomas

Title
Using the Internet to Recruit Immigrants with Limited English Proficiency for Tobacco Use and Alcohol-Related Disorders Screening: A Pilot Study Among Brazilian Immigrants
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
ADAI Small Grants Program
GrantNo
ADAI-201103-Carlini
Abstract
Twenty-four million adults in the US report limited English proficiency (LEP) and together speak more than a hundred other languages at home. Due to linguistic barriers, LEP individuals face disparities in access to health services, including tobacco cessation and alcohol abuse treatment. As Internet access among this population has been growing quickly, development of web-based interventions present an opportunity to offer evidence-based support for behavior change in diverse languages. However, attempts to recruit LEP individuals via the Internet for research studies utilizing recruitment methods that are effective for mainstream populations have had little success. The objective of the proposed research is to identify recruitment strategies that are effective in reaching online immigrants with LEP to participate in studies involving tobacco use and alcohol-related disorders. The focus will be on a subset of the LEP Latino population, Brazilian Portuguese speakers.
<p>
This pilot study will explore the recruitment potential of online approaches that address aspects of Latino immigrant socialization patterns in the US including: a) low trust in mainstream society; b) reliance on personal networks to obtain support, services, and information, and c) strong identification with country of origin as opposed to the Latino/Hispanic category. We will utilize a mix of recruitment methods including emails from trusted sources, banners on online newspapers that support personal networks specific to Brazilians, and target ads on Facebook. The relative success of the recruitment methods tested will inform future research proposals to assess feasibility and preliminary efficacy of web-based tobacco cessation support to LEP individuals.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
ProjStart
July 1, 2011
ProjEnd
June 30, 2012
AwardAmt
$29,996
AccessNo
139
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ADAI
PIEmail
bia@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/internetcarlini

Title
A Trial to Prevent Opioid Overdose: E.D. Based Intervention & Take-Home Naloxone.
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
1R01DA030351-01A1
Abstract
This prospective, randomized controlled study will test an emergency department based intervention with 500 heroin and 500 pharmaceutical opioid users at high risk for overdose. The intervention includes a brief behavioral change counseling session, overdose education and take-home naloxone. Outcomes will include overdose and HIV risk behaviors, overdose occurrence, and health services utilization and costs.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
Prescription Drug Abuse
ProjStart
May 15, 2012
ProjEnd
April 30, 2017
AwardAmt
$456,964
ProjStaff
Anthony Floyd, PhD
AccessNo
140
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://stopoverdose.org">StopOverdose.org</a>
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=8184085&icde=12560665">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
Logo
http://adai.washington.edu/images/stopodbox.jpg

Title
Developing Overdose Prevention Programs for Washington State
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Office of the Attorney General
Abstract
This proposal aims to broaden awareness of overdose and provide information about how to recognize and intervene in opiate overdoses to save lives. We will develop, implement and evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of new trainings utilizing three different modes: in-person, interactive webinar, and web based. Bus advertising will be utilized in two counties to educate the general public and direct them to online training and educational materials.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
ProjStart
May 1, 2012
ProjEnd
August 31, 2013
ProjStaff
Mary Catlin, MPH, BSN, Research Coordinator
AccessNo
141
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://stopoverdose.org">StopOverdose.org</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
AG
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
Logo
http://adai.washington.edu/images/stopodbox.jpg

Title
Web-Assisted Tobacco Intervention with Community College Students
PIName
Scott McIntosh, Ph.D
PITitle
Associate Professor
PIDept
University of Rochester, Public Health Sciences
FundingAgency
National Cancer Institute
GrantNo
R01 CA 152093-01A1
Abstract
This study combines mixed methods of qualitative and quantitative research with a group randomized design to test the effectiveness of Web-Assisted Tobacco Interventions (WATI) with Community College students in a geographically diverse region in Western New York. Informed by recent studies and advances in web-based technology, the proposed study addresses recommended cessation strategies delivered with novel media, and it advances our understanding of the determinants of successful smoking cessation in a predominantly low-income, underserved and understudied population of primarily young adults.
<p>There are 6 million students in Community Colleges. It is estimated that smoking prevalence in this population is 28 to 30%. The proposed study investigates Web-Assisted Tobacco Intervention (WATI), an effective intervention in need of more randomized trials, to meet the needs of this growing population of Community College students, who are an understudied and underserved population of young adult smokers, returning war veterans and persons re-entering the job market. The proposed study's 3 phases are: Phase 1, Key Informant Interviews and Focus Groups to first gain a better understanding of engagement (recruitment and retention), and the needs and characteristics of this unique population; Phase 2, a Group Randomized trial, comparing a reactive basic web-assisted tobacco intervention (with evidence-based components, but limited interactive features) to a proactive multi-faceted online intervention linking various novel WATI components: proactive texting, interactive features, and socially supportive online environments; and Phase 3, dissemination of cessation strategies to the scientific community and Community College stake-holders. The main advantage of the proposed study is that it assesses the effectiveness of recruitment, retention and cessation interventions in the contexts of 1) easily accessible web- based resources for Community College populations, and 2) novel targeted interactive web-site features that can inform interventions for the target population and other populations of adult smokers across large geographic regions. This proposal directly addresses research needs highlighted by the DHHS 2008 update of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: low-income populations; young adult populations; and promising cessation interventions. We hope to learn which formats and interventions are effective in the web-based medium.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
ProjStart
August 1, 2012
ProjEnd
July 31, 2016
AwardAmt
$531,387
ProjStaff
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH (ADAI Research Scientist, Co-Investigator)
AccessNo
142
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=8327701&icde=14798825">NIH RePORTER record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NCI
PIEmail
scott_mcintosh@urmc.rochester.edu
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/webtobaccointer

Title
Drugged Driving Information Service (DDIS)
ShortName
DDIS
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
In a subcontract with Looking Glass Analytics, ADAI will develop a knowledge base as part of the Drugged Driving Information Sercice (DDIS). ADAI will review and organize literature on intervention strategies to prevent or reduce drugged driving.
<p>
DDIS will be an Internet-based data management and online knowledge base. The work proposed will improve substantially the quality, quantity, and accessibility of information for traffic safety personnel, substance abuse researchers and prevention specialists. The innovative feature of the DDIS is the combination of data on a significant public safety problem and analytic tools to manage it. It will provide those in the field with a single source of information to measure the extent of the drugged driving problem in a particular locale and to pick an evidence-based intervention to combat the problem.
Categories
Prevention Research
Training / Information
ProjStart
August 2012
ProjEnd
May 2013
ProjStaff
Heather Lonzack, Nancy Sutherland, Dennis Donovan
AccessNo
143
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Title
Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Intervention with High-Risk Alcohol and Drug Abusing Mothers
ShortName
PCAP
PIName
Therese M. Grant, PhD
Categories
Pregnancy and Alcohol / Drugs
AccessNo
144
Status
Current Projects

Title
Chronic Pain Management and Marijuana Use: Science-Based Education in Times of Legalization.
ShortName
MCACP
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Office of the Attorney General
GrantNo
A85413
Abstract
<img hspace=5 src="http://learnaboutmarijuanawa.org/agbia.jpg" style="float:left;">This project addresses gaps in science-based training and education in the area of chronic pain management and cannabis use. The ultimate goal is to increase awareness of treatment options to treat pain and other medical conditions, and decrease unnecessary suffering among people living with chronic pain in the state of Washington. The project will also provide information and education about medical conditions and populations for whom cannabis is not recommended, as well as side-effects and risks. This project proposes development and provision of training and education resources on chronic pain and medical cannabis for the following target groups: a) staff and volunteers of community organizations that provide information and referral for a range of situations involving substance use and people struggling with chronic and acute conditions (Poison Center, Crisis Clinic and Washington Recovery Helpline); b) health care providers and c) the general public. [Photo from the Office of Attorney General Bob Ferguson.]<p>&nbsp;</p>
Categories
Marijuana
Training / Information
Descriptors
Marijuana
Pain managemant
ProjStart
October 1, 2013
ProjEnd
March 31, 2015
AwardAmt
$110,299
ProjStaff
Sharon Garrett; Dennis M. Donovan; Jennifer Velotta; Roger Roffman; Gregory Carter; Nancy Sutherland; Meg Brunner
AccessNo
145
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.uw.edu/mcacp">Project website</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
AG
PIEmail
bia@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini

Title
Welcome Back: Evaluating Strategies to Re-Engage Smokers in Quitline Cessation Services
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
GrantNo
3U48DP001911-05S2 (SIP 13-073)
Abstract
Tobacco dependence is a chronic relapsing condition that typically requires multiple quit attempts to achieve long-term abstinence. State tobacco quitlines (QLs) are available through a national network and deliver telephone-based interventions for smoking cessation.
<p>
In this project, we will: a) create a registry of QL previous callers from the states of Washington and Indiana. The registry will contain contact information (mail, email, telephone, mobile phone), form of registration utilized for QL services (web, phone, fax referral), services received, tobacco history and socio-demographic characteristics; b) Deliver repeated IVR, SMS and e-mail interventions to encourage registry members to make a new quit attempt and re-engage in QL support services and c) Evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing a menu of technology-driven interventions to re-engage quitline callers in activities that support new quit attempts. Measures will include: proportion and characteristics of registry participants successfully re-contacted; rates of re-engagement, type of support chosen by registry participants and cessation-related intermediate outcomes (quit attempts and quit for 7+days at last contact with QL).
<p>
This project is a Special Interest Project (SIP) component of the Health Promotion Research Center grant (3U48DP001911-05S2), PI Jeff Harris, PhD, Professor in UW Health Services.
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
ProjStart
September 29, 2013
ProjEnd
September 28, 2014
AwardAmt
$198,362
ProjStaff
Lindsay Miles, Research Coordinator
AccessNo
146
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
CDC
PIEmail
bia@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini

Title
Impacts of Cannabis & Cannabis Legalization on Impaired Driving in WA State
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
AAA Foundation
Abstract
In conjunction with the Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center, we will examine the relationship between changes in Washington State cannabis laws and policies and the incidence of cannabis-impaired driving, using linked toxicological, criminal justice, and crash databases. Secondarily we will examine the relationship between the presence and level of cannabis metabolites in driver blood samples and the severity of driving offense, rates, and police-reported crash severity.
<p>In 2012, Washington passed Initiative 502 that licenses and regulates marijuana production, distribution, and possession for adults (age 21 and over); removes state-law criminal and civil penalties for specified activities; taxes and regulates marijuana sales; and earmarks marijuana-related revenues. The Initiative set a level of 5 ng/mL of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in whole blood as a per se level for driving under the influence (DUI).
<p>This change in state law presents a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of legislation on marijuana-impaired driving and crash risk. Our study team is uniquely positioned to conduct these analyses given our combined scientific expertise and our experience with the data sets, research methods, state agencies, and stakeholders.
Categories
Marijuana
Epidemiology and Drug Abuse Trends
Descriptors
Marijuana
Drugged driving
ProjStart
July 2014
ProjEnd
September 2015
ProjStaff
Ali Rowhani-Rahbar, MD, MPH, PhD (Co-Principal Investigator), Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, UW School of Public Health; Beth E. Ebel, MD, MSc, MPH (Co-Investigator), Adjunct Associate Professor, Epidemiology & Health Services, UW School of Public Health, and Associate Professor, Pediatrics
<p>
External collaborators: Fiona Couper, PhD, State Toxicologist, Forensic Laboratory Services Bureau, Washington State Patrol; Staci Hoff, PhD Research Manager, Washington Traffic Safety Commission
Results
Cannabis Use among Drivers Suspected of Driving Under the Influence or Involved in Collisions: Analysis of Washington State Patrol Data. C Banta-Green, A Rowhani-Rahbar, B Ebel, LM Andris, and Q Qui. Report for the AAA Foundation, 6/2016. <a href="https://www.aaafoundation.org/cannabis-use-among-drivers-suspected-driving-under-influence-or-involved-collisions-analysis">Report & related resources</a>
AccessNo
147
Status
Completed Projects
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Title
Promoting Healthy Families and Relationships: Exploring Domestic Violence and Tribal Community Culture to Inform Best Practices
PIName
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
UW Dept. of Global Health - Global WACh (Women, Adolescent, Child Health)
Abstract
Domestic violence is prevalent in many American Indian communities, yet American Indian domestic violence research and culturally appropriate and effective interventions are lacking. To better understand domestic violence and inform best practices in one American Indian tribal community, our community-university team will utilize quantitative and qualitative data and a Grounded Theory approach to: determine domestic violence prevalence; describe community members’ attitudes, beliefs, and the sociocultural/historical milieu around women and children’s safety; assess existing resources and needs; and identify 1-2 existing evidence based domestic violence interventions that meet local needs and may be appropriately and effectively adapted to local culture and setting.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
ProjStart
2013
ProjEnd
2014
AwardAmt
$25,000
ProjStaff
Teresa A. Evans-Campbell, PhD
Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
AccessNo
148
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
GWACH
PIEmail
sradin@adai.uw.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Title
Toolkit for Enhancing Client Retention in Substance Abuse Treatment
PIName
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Behavioral Health & Recovery
Abstract
This project was to develop a toolkit for enhancing engagement and retention in clients in substance abuse treatment. The audience is treatment providers and staff. The toolkit is online product, composed of selected resources and instruction on how to make use of the tools.
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
June 16, 2014
ProjEnd
December 31, 2014
ProjStaff
Meg Brunner, MLS
Jennifer Velotta, CDP, MNPL
AccessNo
149
Status
Completed Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://adai.uw.edu/retentiontoolkit/">Retention Toolkit website</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DBHR
PIEmail
sradin@adai.uw.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Title
Maximizing the Patient-counselor Relationship to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior [Being Safe in Treatment (BEST)]
ShortName
Being Safe in Treatment (BEST)
PIName
Mary Hatch-Mailette, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
1R01HD078163-01A1
Abstract
Achieving sexual risk reduction among people suffering from substance use disorders (SUDs) has proven challenging but not impossible. Substance abuse treatment presents an opportunity to intervene, and there is a need for continued development of sexual risk reduction interventions that can be integrated into treatment settings. Our research group developed the “Being Safe in Treatment” (BEST) sexual risk assessment and feedback tool with funds from an R21 grant “Computerized assistance for treatment professionals in the assessment of sexual risk” (Donald Calsyn, PI; DA022940). The BEST uses the audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) method to determine sexual risk in substance abuse treatment patients. It provides a personalized feedback report for the patient and the patient’s counselor that summarizes the assessment and offers suggestions for reducing sexual risk. The primary goal of the BEST tool is to assist patients in reducing sexual risk behavior or maintaining low risk behavior. The hypothesized change mechanism is enhanced communication between counselor and patient about sexual risk. We seek funding for next steps in testing this intervention. In the R21 BEST development studies, we obtained qualitative feedback about the BEST from potential consumers (substance abuse treatment patients and their counselors) and conducted a brief pilot study on the impact of using the BEST in a methadone maintenance clinic. From these studies we received and then incorporated suggestions on ways to improve the BEST, such as reducing the time needed to take the BEST and adjusting the feedback report to better incorporate the reduced risk associated with long term monogamy. In the pilot study, receiving a BEST feedback report was associated with increased counselor knowledge about patient sexual risk behavior and an increase in patient-counselor discussions about sexual issues. However, many counselors felt unprepared to discuss sexual issues with their patients, suggesting a need for counselor training and providing the impetus for the current proposal. We propose to conduct a 2 x 2 clinical trial in which half of study counselors are randomly assigned to 1) a control condition (a 2 hour training on utilizing a BEST feedback report or 2) the same 2 hour training plus an 8 hour workshop on discussing sexual issues followed by twice monthly coaching. Patients of participating counselors will complete the BEST assessment and will be randomly assigned to receive no feedback or the BEST feedback which includes a personalized report for them and a report to their counselor. Data collection will occur for patients at baseline, 3-months, and 6-months, and for counselors at baseline, post-workshop and 3-months. The primary outcome is the number of unprotected sexual occasions in the prior 3 months and number of counseling sessions in which sexual issues were addressed. Counselor level outcomes of interest include change in counselor sexual knowledge, self-efficacy for addressing sexual matters, and skills for ddressing sexual issues in counseling sessions.
Categories
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
September 23, 2014
ProjEnd
May 31, 2018
ProjStaff
Co-Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Wells, PhD
AccessNo
150
Status
Current Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA

Title
Informing Dissemination of Behavior Therapies to Enhance HIV Care Among
Substance Abusers
ShortName
Therapies for HIV Care
PIName
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
NIDA R03DA039719
Abstract
Substance abuse and HIV infection are a domestic health syndemic that compromises universal test-and-treat approaches for preventing HIV transmission and precipitates calls for quality improvement across the HIV Care Continuum. Dissemination of an empirically-supported behavior therapy to prompt HIV testing in addiction care settings is a large-scale effort, but with benefits attenuated by substance abusers’ poor clinic attendance and antiretroviral (ARV) therapy adherence. Thus, expanded transport of available empirically-supported behavior therapies to HIV care settings is needed to pre-empt such care disengagement. To identify a candidate therapy compatible for HIV care, one must consider with whom and with what intent the HIV workforce is to intervene. Extant prevalence rates for substance use disorders (SUDs) among HIV care enrollees are drawn from single-site trials, and vary by selected patient demography and history. Corresponding sample sizes often preclude analysis at a substance-specific level, even as some substances carry distinct considerations for transmission and course of HIV. Likewise, single-site trials evaluating impacts of substance abuse on patient adherence and response to HIV care offer limited generalizability. Fortunately, a coordinated multisite HIV care repository, governed by Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS), incorporates data from sites across the U.S. and offers opportunity to determine the scope and impact of substance-specific SUDs in a large, diverse population of patients linked to HIV care. Proposed analyses will focus on care engagement, defined as a two-year period following HIV diagnosis and linkage to care. An available CNICS sample of ~10,000 patients will enable computation of broadly representative prevalence rates for substance-specific SUDs and comparisons of such SUD subgroups to non-SUD patients on key outcomes like cumulative viral burden, clinic attendance, ARV adherence, health risks, and quality-of-life. Relative to non-SUD counterparts, SUD subgroups are expected to exhibit greater viral burden, poorer clinic attendance and ARV adherence, more health risks, and lesser quality-of-life. In response to NIDA PA-12-282 (AIDS-Science Track Award for Research Transition), a New Investigator to HIV Research proposes to complement these CNICS-based analyses by gathering of dissemination-focused data during site visits to regional HIV care clinics. Data will be collected from site directors and direct-care staff via mixed-method procedures, with intent to identify from among NIDA-endorsed candidate behavior therapies an approach perceived as contextually-compatible. This low-cost, high-yield approach will advance knowledge of the SUD-HIV syndemic, and inform a future R01 testing implementation of an empirically-supported behavior therapy to engage substance abusers in HIV care.
Categories
Clinical and Health Services
Sexual Behavior and HIV Risk
ProjStart
April 2015
ProjEnd
March 2017
ProjStaff
Blair Beadnell, Heidi Crane, Julia C. Dombrowski, Dennis M. Donovan
AccessNo
152
Status
Current Projects
PIEmail
hartzb@u.washington.edu
BriefDescrip
This project develops a low-cost, high-yield approach to determine the scope and impact of substance-specific SUDs in a large, diverse population of patients linked to HIV care. The project will utilize a coordinated multisite HIV care repository, governed by Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS), that incorporates data from sites across the U.S. Proposed analyses will focus on care engagement, defined as a two-year period following HIV diagnosis and linkage to care.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/therapieshivcare

Title
Integrating Tobacco Cessation Interventions in the Routine of Care of a Rehabilitation Hospital Serving a Rural Population in Washington State.
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Pfizer UCSF Smoking Cessation Leadership Center
Abstract
The primary goal of this project is to implement a tobacco cessation program to ensure that smokers admitted to St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute (SLRI) receive evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions during their hospitalization and after discharge. See more at: <a href="http://smokingcessationleadership.ucsf.edu/partnerships/pfizer-iglc#sthash.emwk9u9s.dpuf">http://smokingcessationleadership.ucsf.edu/partnerships/pfizer-iglc#sthash.emwk9u9s.dpuf</a>
Categories
Tobacco Cessation
ProjStart
May 1, 2015
ProjEnd
October 31, 2016
AwardAmt
$141,148.00.
ProjStaff
Gregory Carter, MD
AccessNo
153
Status
Current Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
Pfizer
PIEmail
bia@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_carlini

Title
A Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Trial of a School-Based Teen Marijuana Checkup
PIName
Denise D. Walker, PhD
PITitle
Rearch Associate Professor
PIDept
Social Work
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
GrantNo
1R01DA040650-01
Abstract
Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance with approximately 25 million people in the U.S. having used marijuana in the past year. An estimated 10% of persons who have ever used marijuana will become daily users, with lifetime marijuana dependence rates estimated at 4% of the general population, the highest of any illicit drug. Given that the great majority of adults with one or more marijuana use disorder symptoms report they began smoking before age 18, early intervention efforts with adolescents, particularly those who are using heavily, becomes an important public health objective in order to prevent later problems.

<p>The objectives of the proposed study are to advance Type 2 translational science through an effectiveness-implementation "type 2" hybrid design to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an efficacious intervention (Teen Marijuana Check-Up, TMCU) and compare the feasibility, acceptability, impact and cost-effectiveness of two integrity monitoring support systems. Marijuana continues to be the most frequently used drug in the U.S. and adolescent use is associated with negative effects such as academic failure, dropout, and emotional problems. Although marijuana is the most common presenting substance for 12-17 year olds seeking substance abuse treatment, few voluntarily seek indicated services. The TMCU is a brief, school-based motivational enhancement therapy approach that has been systematically evaluated in three randomized controlled trials with reliable beneficial effects in prompting voluntary participation in the intervention and decreasing adolescent marijuana use.

<p>With TMCU now well-positioned for broad dissemination, its public health impact may be enhanced by further research addressing: 1) to what extent its documented efficacy under controlled conditions translates to real-world effectiveness, and 2) what support systems are most useful in promoting sustained integrity in its delivery by the available school-based personnel. The proposed type 2 effectiveness/implementation hybrid trial will include randomization at multiple levels. Students will be randomly-assigned in a 1:2 ratio to `services-as-usual' and TMCU intervention conditions, and school-based personnel identified to deliver TMCU will be randomly-assigned to do so under governance of a `gold-standard' training/oversight support system (i.e., rapid, continual performance-based feedback and weekly coaching about integrity of TMCU delivery) or a less resource-intensive support system similarly including performance-based feedback but with process benchmarking (defined by prior performance of research interventionists in TMCU efficacy trials) prompting points at which these school-based personnel receive purveyor coaching. Expected trial participation of ten schools will enable recruitment of 30 TMCU interventionists, and access to a pool of 250 marijuana-using students during a two-year implementation period. This nested design (e.g., students in schools/intervention conditions; interventionists in schools/training/oversight support systems) will utilize multilevel models in study analyses to account for possible school-level clustering. A cost analysis will also be conducted. Longitudinal outcome and process data will be collected from school based staff (6, 12, 18, & 24 month follow-ups) and students (3 and 6 month follow- ups). The trial will occur in Washington state at an opportune time when legislative, fiscal, and socio-cultural factors converge to heighten potential adolescent exposure to marijuana-related harms-represents an effort by this investigative team to respond to such local challenges in a manner that will advance understanding of best practices for dissemination and implementation of this and other efficacious, school-based interventions.
Categories
Marijuana
Implementation Research
Descriptors
Teen Marijuana Check-Up
Motivational Enhancement Therapy
School-based interventions
ProjStart
May 15, 2016
ProjEnd
February 28, 2020
AwardAmt
$495,336
ProjStaff
Multiple PI: Bryan Hartzler, PhD, ADAI Senior Research Scientist
AccessNo
154
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_details.cfm?aid=9003775&icde=30041612">NIH RePORTER Record</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIEmail
ddwalker@uw.edu
BriefDescrip
Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance with approximately 25 million people in the U.S. having used marijuana in the past year. An estimated 10% of persons who have ever used marijuana will become daily users, with lifetime marijuana dependence rates estimated at 4% of the general population, the highest of any illicit drug. Given that the great majority of adults with one or more marijuana use disorder symptoms report they began smoking before age 18, early intervention efforts with adolescents, particularly those who are using heavily, becomes an important public health objective in order to prevent later problems.
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/28Q4h1e

Title
Navigating Our Strengths and Needs: A Community Assessment Project for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe
PIName
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe through a grant from the US-DHHS Administration for Native Americans
Abstract
This project will increase accessibility to the full range of services and programs, reduce barriers to participation, and improve the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe’s understanding of the community’s strengths and weaknesses.
<p>
This project will develop, conduct, analyze, and report on a comprehensive assessment of Tribal needs, assets, strengths, challenges, resources and priorities that can be utilized for effective cross-disciplinary planning and evaluation.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
ProjStart
January 1, 2016
ProjEnd
December 31, 2017
AccessNo
155
Status
Current Projects
PIEmail
sradin@adai.uw.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/28U8OUl

Title
Evaluation of the Feasibility and Potential Impacts for Seattle Police Department Officers to Carry and Administer Naloxone for Opioid Overdose Reversal
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Seattle Police Department
Abstract
This goals of this project are to 1) evaluate the feasibility and potential impacts of a Seattle Police Department Pilot Program, in cooperation with the Seattle Fire Department (SFD), to carry and administer naloxone for opioid overdose reversal; and 2) evaluate whether training police officers to recognize and respond to opioid overdoses impacts the health of those who have an opioid overdose, and/or impacts the officer’s perceptions of their role as a police officer or their perceptions of opioid addiction and opioid users.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
Implementation Research
Descriptors
Overdose prevention; heroin; opioids
ProjStart
May 1, 2016
ProjEnd
April 30, 2017
AccessNo
156
Status
Current Projects
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/28QjmoG

Title
Consumers’ Perspectives on the Function of Marijuana in Their Lives
PIName
Robin Harwick, PhD
PITitle
Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
Abstract
The dichotomy between medicinal and recreational marijuana present in Washington state law reflects the way US science and policy have approached marijuana use for many decades. However, recent research suggests that boundaries between these two types of marijuana use - firmly delineated in public policies - seem quite blurred to consumers. In both clinical and community samples, medical and non-medical marijuana consumption often overlap, and consumers may transition over time from medical to non-medical use or vice-versa. Lines between these types of cannabis consumption may soon blur further as Washington law requires medical marijuana dispensaries to close and the medical system is merged into non-medical retail. This proposal aims to understand cannabis consumption from the perspective of adult regular users, without preconceived ideas that their use is defined by current categories of medicinal or recreational (non-medical). Using grounded theory and qualitative methods of data collection, its purpose is to understand marijuana consumption styles from the ground up. Participants who define themselves as regular marijuana consumers will be recruited for focus groups. Groups (6 total of 6-10 people each) will be recorded and transcribed for analysis. In them, participants will share their perspectives on marijuana's functional utility to them along with their different motivations, settings, and contexts for consumption. Qualitative data analyses informed by grounded theory will be used to produce a taxonomy of how these adults perceive marijuana's function(s) in their lives. Results will delineate cannabis consumption styles and functions described in consumers' accounts, relationships among these styles within participants, and the proportion of each consumption style across participants. Knowledge acquired can be used in shaping research, policies, and treatment related to marijuana consumption. Findings will also inform future grant applications on the development of marijuana consumption survey questions and measures that are valid, reliable, and standardized.
<p>
The overall objective of this study is to generate a taxonomy of how adults who regularly consume marijuana perceive its function in their lives. In particular, this study will use grounded theory to understand the phenomenon of marijuana consumption from the consumer's perspective, potentially broadening the framework beyond the binary categories of medical vs non-medical cannabis.
Categories
Marijuana
ProjStart
July 1, 2016
ProjEnd
June 30, 2017
ProjStaff
N. Tatiana Masters, PhD, Research Scientist, ADAI; Beatriz Carlini, PhD, Research Scientist, ADAI
AccessNo
157
Status
Current Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
ADAI
PIEmail
harwick@uw.edu

Title
Washington State Innovation Initiative: Medication Assisted Treatment Upon Release from Prison
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Laura and John Arnold Foundation
Abstract
The goal of this study is to develop, implement, and assess the feasibility of procedures to provide effective services for offenders with OUD releasing from WA DOC prisons, with the aim to facilitate linkage to ongoing MAT in the community following release from custody beginning with an initial intervention aimed to educate inmates so they can make informed decisions regarding medication options.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
Implementation Research
Descriptors
Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT)
Prisoners
Naloxone
ProjStart
August 1, 2016
ProjEnd
July 31, 2018
ProjStaff
Theresa Hoeft, PhD, Judith Tsui, PhD, Jeanne Sears, MD, MPH
AccessNo
158
Status
Current Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
Arnold Fdn
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Title
Washington State Project to Prevent Prescription Drug / Opioid Overdose
ShortName
PDO
PIName
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
PIDept
Affiliate Associate Professor, School of Public Health
FundingAgency
Washington State Division of Behavioral Health & Recovery
GrantNo
SP-16-005; (CFDA) NO.: 93.243
Abstract
The Washington State Project to Prevent Prescription Drug/Opioid Overdose is a statewide network of organizations mobilizing communities, providing overdose response training, and distributing naloxone through syringe exchange programs in four high need areas. Activities engage professional and lay first responders, pharmacies, local and regional stakeholders and health care providers to reduce overdose risk and deaths among people who use heroin and prescription opioids.
<p>
The Washington State Project to Prevent Prescription Drug/Opioid Overdose (WA-PDO) will be a collaborative five-year project between the Washington Department of Social and Health Services’ (DSHS) Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR) and the University of Washington’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute (ADAI) with the purpose of <b>preventing opioid overdose and deaths from opioid overdose, and building local infrastructure to plan, implement, evaluate, and fund overdose prevention efforts in the long-term.</b> WA-PDO will develop a network of opioid overdose experts and interventions to efficiently extend core overdose prevention expertise and centralized resources at ADAI’s Center for Opioid Safety Education program (COSE) to four diverse, high-need areas (HNA) across the state. With COSE as the central hub and the four regional nodes coordinating WA-PDO overdose prevention activities, WA-PDO will reach adults who use prescription opioids/heroin and professionals and community members who may be the first responders at an overdose. Core interventions include stakeholder engagement, overdose prevention/response training, and naloxone distribution. Objectives include:1) develop overdose prevention strategic plans in four HNAs; 2) equip 2,400 police, fire, and emergency medical services personnel (PFEMS) with overdose response training/naloxone; 3) equip 13,200 lay responders (LR) with overdose response training/naloxone 4) increase naloxone dispensed by pharmacists by 20% each year; 5) educate 1,400 health care providers on opioid guidelines, patient overdose education, and naloxone and opioid use disorders; 6) develop new models of substance use treatment linkage and care coordination in four HNAs; 7) facilitate coordination in four HNAs among local andregional stakeholders and with state agencies; 8) build and harmonize data infrastructures to inform resource allocation, maintain overdose surveillance, and measure outcomes; and 9) create knowledge translation infrastructure to disseminate emerging data, best practices, training, and technical assistance. Over the five-year project, our activities will reach 2,400 PFEMS responders, 13,200 lay responders, 1,400 health care providers, 120 pharmacies, and 160 community organizations across four priority regions.
Categories
Overdose Prevention
Prescription Drug Abuse
ProjStart
September 1, 2016
ProjEnd
August 31, 2021
ProjStaff
Susan Kingston, Program Operations Specialist
AccessNo
160
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://stopoverdose.org/cose/">http://stopoverdose.org/cose/</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DBHR
PIEmail
calebbg@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_bantagreen

Title
Beliefs and Attitudes for Successful Implementation in Schools (BASIS)
PIName
Aaron Lyon, PhD
PITitle
Assistant Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
National Institute of Mental Health
GrantNo
1R21MH108714-01A1
Abstract
Only about half of the youth in the United States who experience mental health problems receive indicated treatment, resulting in high societal cost. Evidence-based practices (EBP) for mental health conditions yield significant benefits to children when they are actually implemented with fidelity. Although 70 to 80% mental health services for youth are currently provided in schools, few students receive EBP.

Barriers to EBP implementation in schools include both those at the organizational level (lack of funding, poor administrative support, high personnel turnover, inadequate training) as well as those at the individual level (perception of intervention acceptability and appropriateness, time demands, social norms, conflicting theoretical perspectives). Although significant attention has been devoted to categorizing implementation barriers and potential strategies, there have been few efforts to develop and test innovative interventions to enhance implementation. In schools, implementation initiatives often occur as top-down mandates without attention to the individual factors found to impact provider behavior, such as provider attitudes about, or intentions to implement EBP, following training. Failing to address these individual-level barriers is especially costly, as individual behavior change is ultimately required for successful EBP implementation, even when organizational factors (e.g., evidence-informed policy, supportive leadership, effective training) are in place.

Consistent with the aims of the R21 mechanism, the goal of this study is to adapt and test the feasibility and potential efficacy of a theory-driven pre-implementation intervention to address individual-level barriers to EBP implementation – Beliefs and Attitudes for Successful Implementation in Schools (BASIS) – designed to improve school-based mental health providers’ implementation of EBP. BASIS is intended to be a feasible and scalable first-line or adjunctive implementation enhancement intervention that is facilitative of other efforts (e.g., organizational interventions) that target high quality EBP implementation.

Aims of this study are to: (1) Adapt an existing, theory-driven implementation intervention (BASIS), previously used with educators, to improve the EBP implementation behaviors of SBMH providers; and (2) Assess the viability of a later clinical trial by: (a) establishing the feasibility, acceptability, and appropriateness of the BASIS intervention among school-based mental health providers, and (b) pilot testing BASIS, as compared to an Attention Control, delivered as pre-implementation intervention prior to training in a specific, existing EBP. Key organizational factors (e.g., implementation climate) will also be evaluated and included as covariates and we will explore trends in the data to inform the design of a larger trial. Ultimately, BASIS offers an innovative and scalable approach to improving SBMH providers’ uptake and use of EBP in order to increase the number of youth with mental health problems who receive high quality services.
Categories
Behavioral Risk
ProjStart
08/15/2016
ProjEnd
07/31/2018
AwardAmt
$162,338 directs Year 1
ProjStaff
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
AccessNo
162
Status
Current Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIMH
PIEmail
lyona@uw.edu
PIBioSite
https://depts.washington.edu/pbhjp/people/profiles/lyon

Title
Knowledge of and Attitudes about Medication Assisted Treatment within American Indian Communities
ShortName
MAT in American Indian Communities
PIName
Sandra M. Radin, PhD
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Abstract
This study, in partnership with two American Indian tribes in the Pacific Northwest, addresses critical barriers in the implementation of medication assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). MAT approaches have been shown to substantially improve outcomes for OUD patients, yet provider and patient biases against MAT and organizational barriers to MAT use are widespread, particularly within tribal communities where there is a strong preference toward total abstinence as a goal. The study aim is to identify knowledge and perceptions of MAT approaches and barriers/facilitators for implementation and sustained use. Study results will inform future clinical efforts to tailor MAT for high need, low resource American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) populations.
Categories
American Indians / Alaska Natives
Implementation Research
CTN (NIDA Clinical Trials Network)
ProjStart
2017
ProjStaff
Co-investigators: Dennis Donovan, Dennis Wendt
AccessNo
163
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/protocols/ctn0078ot3.htm">Protocol record in CTN Library</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIDA
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_radin

Title
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in Adults: Health and Neurobehavior
PIName
Therese M. Grant, PhD
PITitle
(PI at University of Washington site)
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit
FundingAgency
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
GrantNo
1U01AA026108-01
Abstract
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is rarely diagnosed in adulthood and there are no recognized treatment protocols because, despite decades of research on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), scientific study of adults with FASD is almost unknown. Although neurodevelopmental deficits may be persistent, without accurate information about mental and physical health problems associated with PAE, caregivers, health care professionals and policy makers cannot make informed decisions, diagnose accurately, provide care or allocate resources.
<p>
The current project will address this deficit by: 1) Establishing a registry of 500 adults with known PAE/FASD diagnosis or who are matched controls, who will respond to a health survey, and who will be available for future studies; 2) among 240 affected individuals (FAS or FASD) and controls, examining dysmorphology, abstracting medical records, and evaluating substance use (self-report and biological samples), cognition, mental health, and social factors that might contribute to outcomes and disability status; and 3) assessing immune status via blood samples to identify outcomes associated with health indicators. Our goal is to refine diagnostic criteria for FASD in this age group and determine the persistence and severity of disability associated with PAE.
Categories
Pregnancy and Alcohol / Drugs
ProjStart
July 1, 2017
ProjEnd
May 31, 2022
ProjStaff
Multiple PI: Claire Coles, PhD (PI at Emory University site); Sandra Radin, PhD (Co-I); Kathryn Kelly; Collaborators: Joanne Weinberg, PhD (University of British Columbia); Edward P. Riley, PhD (San Diego State University); The Collaborative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (CIFASD)
AccessNo
164
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="https://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=9391907&icde=36131542&ddparam=&ddvalue=&ddsub=&cr=1&csb=default&cs=ASC&pball=">Project in NIH Reporter</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
NIAAA
PIEmail
granttm@uw.edu

Title
Marijuana Use among High-Risk Mothers in Washington State
PIName
Therese M. Grant, PhD
PITitle
Professor
PIDept
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
FundingAgency
Dedicated Marijuana Fund
Abstract
This study examined how legalization affected alcohol and drug use in a sample of pregnant and parenting women with substance use disorders. Data source: Exit interviews from a three-year case management intervention program (Parents and Child Assistance Program - PCAP) from nine counties in Washington State. The sample (N = 1,359) was divided into two cohorts based on whether participants had completed the program before or after legalization. Results: Most study participants reported complete abstinence from alcohol and non-prescription drugs at program exit. Among those who were still using substances, women who completed the intervention after marijuana legalization were significantly more likely to report marijuana use at program exit compared to women who completed before legalization. Across both cohorts (pre- and post-legalization), we found a positive association of exit marijuana use with alcohol, illegal methadone, other opioids, amphetamines, and cocaine use; after controlling for historical period, marijuana use at PCAP exit increased significantly after marijuana legalization in the state. Women who were not abstinent from marijuana at program exit were likely to report use of other substances as well. Our study design demonstrates an association but does not allow us to conclude that marijuana use leads to other substance use among this sample of women with a history of poly-substance use. Results add to the preliminary body of literature on how legalization of marijuana affects substance use in specific populations.
Categories
Marijuana
Pregnancy and Alcohol / Drugs
ProjStart
March 1, 2016
ProjEnd
June 30, 2016
ProjStaff
Chris Graham, Bia Carlini, Cara Ernst, Natalie Novick Brown
Results
Grant TM, Graham JC; Carlini BH; Ernst CC; Brown NN. Use of marijuana and other substances among pregnant and parenting women with substance use Disorders: Changes in Washington State after marijuana legalization. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2017 in press)
Notes
x
AccessNo
165
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DMF

Title
Multi-State Examination of Cannabis Use Disorder Rates in HIV Care
PIName
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Dedicated Marijuana Fund
Abstract
A Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems cohort (N=10,652) of HIV-positive adults linked to care at seven United State sites, including Seattle, was examined. Based on a patient-report instrument, the prevalence of recent cannabis use and corresponding conditional probabilities for Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) were calculated for the aggregate sample and demographic subgroups. Conditional probability of CUD among cannabis-using patients was 49%, with the highest conditional probabilities among demographic subgroups of young adults and those with non-specified sexual orientation (67-69%) and the lowest conditional probability among females and those 50+ years of age (42% apiece). Similarly, youthful age and male gender emerged as robust multivariate model predictors of CUD. In the context of increasingly lenient policies for use of cannabis as a therapeutic agent for chronic conditions like HIV/AIDS, current study findings offer needed direction in terms of specifying targeted patient groups in HIV care on whom resources for enhanced surveillance and intervention efforts will be most impactful.
Categories
Marijuana
HIV/AIDS
ProjStart
March 1, 2016
ProjEnd
June 30, 2016
Results
Hartzler B, Carlini BH, Newville H, Crane HM, Eron JJ, Elvin H. Geng EH, Mathews WC, Mayer KH, Moore RD, Mugavero MJ, Napravnik S, Rodriguez B, Donovan DM. Identifying HIV care enrollees at-risk for cannabis use disorder. <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2016.1271393">AIDS Care 2017;29(7):846-850.</a>
Notes
x
AccessNo
166
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DMF

Title
Comparative Examination of Cannabis Use Disorder as a Risk Factor in HIV Care
PIName
Bryan Hartzler, PhD
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Dedicated Marijuana Fund
Abstract
A Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems cohort (N=9,153) of HIV+ patients linked to care at seven U.S. settings, including Seattle, was examined. Patient-report surveys were used to delineate the cohort as follows: cannabis abstainers, cannabis users without Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD), and cannabis users with CUD. Generalized estimating equations examined two-year care continuity, comparing these cannabis groups and testing effect modification by established CUD predictors (i.e., age-group, sex, care setting, assessment timing). Supplemental analyses explored group rates of concurrent risky use of other substances. Findings include: 1) a group effect, with 68% care continuity among cannabis users with CUD vs. 73% among cannabis abstainers; 2) effect modification by age-group and assessment timing, with lower care continuity rate among 18-29 year-old cannabis users with CUD than same-age counterparts (56% vs. 67-69%) and greater historical reliability in assessment of their poor care continuity; and 3) cannabis use as a correlate of risky tobacco use, and CUD as a correlate of risky tobacco and alcohol use. Taken together, findings distinguish CUD—and not cannabis use per se—as a risk to care continuity, and underscore a need for diagnostic assessment and polysubstance screening in surveillance efforts.
Categories
Marijuana
HIV/AIDS
ProjStart
March 1, 2017
ProjEnd
June 30, 2017
Results
Hartzler B, Carlini BH, Williams JR, Crane HM, Eron JJ, Elvin H. Geng EH, Mathews WC, Mayer KH, Moore RD, Mugavero MJ, Napravnik S, Rodriguez B, & Donovan DM. Cannabis as a Risk Factor to HIV Care Continuity in the United States. Manuscript submitted to AIDS Care.
Notes
x
AccessNo
167
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DMF

Title
Medical Cannabis in HIV-positive Substance Users
PIName
Howard Newville, PhD
PITitle
Research Consultant
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute<br>
Center for AIDS Research)
FundingAgency
Dedicated Marijuana Fund
Abstract
Recreational cannabis use has been associated with other substance use and decreased antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among people living with HIV (PLWH), but the effect of medical cannabis is unknown. We examined substance use and ART adherence in PLWH, comparing medical, recreational, and non-cannabis users. Out of 294 participants, 84 (63%) reported medical cannabis use, while 50 (37%) acknowledged recreational use. Recreational cannabis users were more likely to use a variety of substances than medical and non-cannabis users. They had greater alcohol and drug use severity than non-cannabis users, while medical cannabis users did not differ from non-cannabis users. Recreational cannabis users also had lower rates of ART adherence than non-cannabis users and medical cannabis users, who did not differ from each other. Controlling for substance use severity and age, ART nonadherence was associated with recreational cannabis use, while medical cannabis users did not differ from non-cannabis users. PLWH who use medical cannabis may have different substance use and ART adherence patterns than recreational cannabis users, indicating they are distinct groups. It is important to learn more about the specific reasons for cannabis use and their benefits and consequences to more precisely focus HIV treatments.
Categories
Marijuana
HIV/AIDS
ProjStart
March 1, 2016
ProjEnd
June 30, 2016
Results
Newville H & Sorensen JL Substance use and antiretroviral adherence in medical, recreational, and non-users of cannabis. Manuscript in preparation.
Notes
x
AccessNo
168
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DMF

Title
Drug Helplines and Adult Marijuana Users: Assessment in Washington, Colorado, Oregon, and Alaska
PIName
Beatriz H. Carlini, PhD, MPH
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Dedicated Marijuana Fund
Abstract
Drug helplines are well-known and widely utilized resources for those seeking help with managing their substance use. Using “secret shoppers,” a preliminary assessment of the drug helplines in 4 states was performed. Calls were placed to the helpline staff, where the secret shopper posed as an adult user of marijuana interested in decreasing their marijuana use, and asked questions about cannabinoids and methods of marijuana consumption. In 100% of the calls placed, helpline staff had no knowledge about the effects and interactions of marijuana's 2 main components (tetrahydrocannabinol [THC] and cannabidiol [CBD]), nor could they explain the risk differential of smoking, eating, or vaporizing marijuana. In all but one of the calls placed, helpline responders were respectful and empathic. The assessment suggests that drug helplines are equipped with a respectful, empathetic, and nonjudgmental staff who lack important knowledge to best serve those seeking help for marijuana use.
Categories
Marijuana
ProjStart
February 1, 2016
ProjEnd
June 30, 2016
ProjStaff
Sharon Garrett, MPH
Results
Carlini BH, Garrett SB. Drug helplines and adult marijuana users: an assessment in Washington, Colorado, Oregon, and Alaska. Substance Abuse 2017 (in press). doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2017.1355872">10.1080/08897077.2017.1355872</a>
Online Training: Marijuana Training for Help Line Staff: <a href="http://adai.uw.edu/helpline/">http://adai.uw.edu/helpline/</a>
AccessNo
169
Status
Completed Projects
FundingAgencyAbbrev
DMF

Title
Northwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center
ShortName
NWATTC
PIName
Hartzler, Bryan, PhD
PITitle
Senior Research Scientist / NWATTC Director
PIDept
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute
FundingAgency
Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
Categories
Training / Information
ProjStart
30-Sep-20017
ProjEnd
20-Sep-2022
ProjStaff
Denna Vandersloot, Co-Director; Bia Carlini, Meg Brunner, Dennis Donovan, Erinn McGraw
AccessNo
171
Status
Current Projects
RelatedWebSites
<a href="http://www.attcnetwork.org/regional-centers/?rc=northwest">http://www.attcnetwork.org/regional-centers/?rc=northwest</a>
FundingAgencyAbbrev
SAMHSA
PIEmail
hartzb@u.washington.edu
PIBioSite
http://bit.ly/adaistaff_hartzler
ShortURL
http://bit.ly/nwattc_uw